A podcast on Covid

A couple of days ago I had a chat with Dr Zac Cox about all things Covid. Which wandered about a bit, and does last for an hour and a half, we were enjoying ourselves. Sorry for my hungover look. I was a bit hungover.

However, even though it is a bit long, I thought that regular readers of this blog may be interested in having a look. It is on Brandnewtube, because if it were on YouTube it would not last long. The new world censors would have a fit.

It can be seen here https://brandnewtube.com/watch/dr-zac-uncensored-with-dr-malcolm-kendrick-live_W2EGf2HuoMorJVI.html

177 thoughts on “A podcast on Covid

      1. Bill Logan

        Yes, working now. It’s a long one but worth listening to all of it

        Big facial similarities between you and Paul Hollywood.

        Reply
    1. Harry de Boer

      Neither on mine. I’m using the latest Fedora (v.32) with encoder updates and it just won’t view.
      Could somebody upload it to for instance bitchute.com or brighteon.com?

      Reply
  1. undine2006

    International Lawsuits Being Prepared Against The Corona Scam – Crimes Against Humanity

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/rule-of-law/international-lawsuits-being-prepared-against-the-corona-scam/

    On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 at 17:51, Dr. Malcolm Kendrick wrote:

    > Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A couple of days ago I had a chat with Dr > Zac Cox about all things Covid. Which wondered about a bit, and does last > for an hour and a half, we were enjoying ourselves. Sorry for my hungover > look. I was a bit hungover. However, even though it is a bit lon” >

    Reply
    1. Joyce

      No problem on my iPad in UK. Straight in, and video commences immediately. Could depend on the age/model of iPad.

      Reply
  2. John G

    sharing a platform with David Icke and Piers Corbyn (amongst others)?

    I guess it maybe less censored and restricted, but doesn’t necessarily lend much credibility

    cheers John

    Reply
    1. Harry de Boer

      I don’t believe in guilt by association.
      The reason Dr. Kendrick posts the video there is that it isn’t being censored, which is a good thing.
      So people can post all kinds of controversial stuff there, including David Icke.
      Just filter out what you don’t like. It doesn’t make the credible videos un-credible. In fact, ‘from credible platform’ is the ‘authority argument’ which I happen to hate immensely also.

      Reply
    2. anglosvizzera

      That’s because they’ve moved to this new platform as their videos were deleted by Youtube – same with Dr K.

      Reply
  3. ptrbsmith

    Hello Malcolm, not sure if it’s my end or not but the link to “brand newtube” only produces a photo with play buttons but there doesn’t seem to be anything with it, it won’t play. For those of us who love our data doctored by you this is just cruel. I’ll try it again from the laptop once home. Cheers, Peter

    Reply
  4. Bob

    Beg pardon. It does play if I Google it and go to the Brand New Tube said and play it from there rather than follow your link.

    Reply
      1. Lynda Morgan

        Yes, it was a bit fiddly. I had to register with Brand New Tube, and then I got it to play on the iPad – but only when I’d registered, and then I had to find it, so it didn’t work directly from the link.

        Reply
  5. Beth Darrall

    Sadly, this won’t play. Has anyone else had problems or is it just my computer?

    Beth Darrall

    A Fan!

    >

    Reply
  6. Chrissie Biggs

    The link works but the play button doesn’t work?

    On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 at 17:52, Dr. Malcolm Kendrick wrote:

    > Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A couple of days ago I had a chat with Dr > Zac Cox about all things Covid. Which wondered about a bit, and does last > for an hour and a half, we were enjoying ourselves. Sorry for my hungover > look. I was a bit hungover. However, even though it is a bit lon” >

    Reply
  7. Damien Sanderson

    Hi again Malcom . . . My previous comment holds if you attempt to start the video from the url in the email. If you go to the Blog (I do it by clicking on the “See all Comments”) then the url given at the end of the post does get you to the video. . . . . Will just go and reheat the cocoa and settle down . . . looking forward to some pearls.

    Reply
  8. dogsday

    Hi. The error is mine.
    I tried to publish the video on DrK’s site to save going off somewhere else to watch it. This didn’t work and the email got sent out before I could stop it.
    The link on this site works.
    Apologies for the cock-up
    DD

    Reply
  9. Trish C

    The link doesn’t work for me (iPhone) but I can watch the video by going into Brandnewtube and searching for it.

    Reply
  10. Elaine Gallaher

    Glad to hear from you – I was starting to worry that you had been “got at”, especially after the police arrested the German doctor who tried to speak out at a London demo.

    Reply
  11. Sue

    The page loads but doesn’t play. Could you upload it to bitchute? I’m glad to have your work to read, Dr Kendrick, msm doesn’t cut it!

    Reply
  12. JohnC

    I would appreciate some thoughts about this. I saw a patient today, who was also a nurse, who had had CoViD19 in May. They’d had the antibody test which was positive. They then had regular tests for antibodies on a weekly basis along with nasal and throat swabs. The antibody test remained positive whilst the swabs were negative. The last test they had was last week, with the same result negative swab test but positive for antibodies 4 months after the first infection. This person said that they weren’t the only one, there were several nurses with the same results profile, whilst physicians who also had CoViD19 and antibodies initially are now negative for both swab tests and antibodies.

    Also today I saw my first child patient with mask related impetigo.

    Reply
    1. Joe Dopelle

      It takes a very open mind to accept this, but it seems very likely that the PCR test is completely unfit for purpose (as it’s not a diagnostic test at all); and antibody tests are also useless, as they may be triggered by different antibodies such as those against the common cold.

      We have an alleged disease that has virtually no unique signs or symptoms, and for which there is no laboratory test.

      Only politicians could come up with that.

      Reply
    2. Steve-R

      Which antibodies? I cannot lay my eyes on the research at the moment, but while the expression of (I think) IgG wanes quite quickly, IgM ( again I think but I may have these the wrong way around) can be present at raised levels for many months – IgA is somewhere in between.
      There is therefore no reason to expect positive swab tests in the absence of antibodies, this would only be the case in the early stages of infection.

      Reply
    3. AhNotepad

      If antibodies are made, I would expect them to persist. I understand this is one protection mechanism. Swab tests I assume are PCR, inherently unreliable, and the cause of much of the testdemic problems now seen. That those tests were negative I would not see as significant.

      Reply
      1. JohnC

        From my perspective:
        RT-PCR test is inappropriate as they use 40+ cycles.
        Most people do not produce antibodies as the innate pattern matching cells or their T cells can handle the virus, which is why children and young adults show few or no symptoms. This applies to most viral infections.
        Antibodies of all types are only produced in severe cases of infection. These tend to be short lived (around 90 days or so depending on type) vaccines use adjuvants to extend this time.
        My patient presented with symptoms of vestibular neuritis, which can be triggered by infection.
        They also had a persistent headache which could also be viral.
        In May the patient had had symptomatic CoViD19. The patient was tested for antibodies and was positive. Over the last few months the antibody test was positive but PCR test was negative, this was the case last week.
        I was hypothesising that the virus was still present elsewhere, maintaining antibody production, and not in the respiratory tract,(where even fragments the PCR test would detect)

        Reply
        1. anna m

          I don’t understand your question. The swab should become negative once the infection is cleared and antibodies persist, often for a lifetime.

          Reply
        2. Steve-R

          Very interesting John, since we know that this virus is not restricted to the ability to infect respiratory tract cells, or even restricted to the ACE receptor, and has been categorised early on as biphasic, is it likely that the infection only persists in cells apart from the respiratory tract and therefore cannot be sampled by nasal swab?
          Could samples of any other bodily fluid be sent for PCR testing?
          Does Hope-Simpson’s work on flu offer any solutions? Are influenza viruses, while ‘hiding’ in non-infectious form, detectable by PCR testing?

          Reply
        3. anglosvizzera

          Isn’t that a similar scenario for shingles, that the varicella virus from a prior chickenpox infection is still ‘lurking’ in the body? I think I once read that measles virus was also isolated from people who developed RA (sometimes the vaccine-strain instead of wild measles.) So perhaps that’s what your patient has (and maybe is the cause of ‘long Covid’ and other post-viral conditions). Maybe there are certain nutritional supplements that may help eliminate the virus? (I would add that homeopathy has helped people I know with PVFS/ME but then you’d probably laugh at me!)

          Reply
          1. Fumbletrumpet

            It does seem to have become fashionable (if that’s the right phrase) to dismiss homoeopathy recently, whereas nearly 30 years ago it was thought by many to be a helpful ‘alternative’. The idea that a small dose of something could be beneficial that in larger doses would be harmful is, a little, how I thought (not being medical) vaccines and acquired immunities work. Some may well still do. For some people. Homoeopathic remedies, despite their extreme dilutions, have apparently had beneficial results in animal treatments, thereby discounting the psychosomatic/placebo effect.
            There’s a lot of data out there showing first and second waves of infection where the morbidity percentage of the second is much lower than the first. Remains to be seen if that’s the case in the UK, but other nations ‘ahead’ of us on a second wave certainly seem to have recorded this. How much of this is down to better treatments, more testing and how many of the second wave positive infections are false positives, distorting the data, we will perhaps never know. But it does seem entirely conceivable that many, many more were infected than the initial test results showed first time around, infected not realising that it was Covid causing their symptoms. Then lodging a positive result second time around, on a re-infection, but with very much milder symptoms, during the second wave. The idea of herd-acquired immunity being a perfect immunity forever seems very unlikely. But for those that react to a mild initial dose achieving better resistance and lesser symptoms on subsequent infection iterations, seems to be the pattern with many other infectious viruses. It’s in the virus’ interests to act in that way. And it’s seemingly the only option for those of us ineligible for (or choosing not to receive) the vaccines once available anyway.

    4. Terry Wright

      thanks JohnC; in all of this, we seem to have become Alice in Wonderland and turned all upside down:

      so “cases” used to mean: a person is self-evidently unwell, seeks medical scrutiny and one attempts to say why; perhaps finally with a test after clinical assessment;

      now we randomly seem to take completely well folks; and try to say they have a life-threatening disease; and they are so ill, only a test will distinguish them from anyone else in the street who also seems fine ….

      So ……… “who had had CoViD19 in May” …….. asymptomatic?

      “They then had regular tests for antibodies on a weekly basis along with nasal and throat swabs.”

      were they unwell: we do things for rona, that would never have been done before, surely: meaning repeatedly testing folks; with any other respiratory viral infection, most feel confident that if the person is now well, then .. they are well ……

      “The antibody test remained positive whilst the swabs were negative.” So the poxy PCR test was negative: seemingly no dead viral fragments in the nose; so can we assume the innate component of their immune system, producing AMPs (antimicrobial peptides), did not kill the virus in their nostrils; but some got into their system, so their T-cells (T lymphocytes) must have detected this; however the immune system was sluggish; T-cells did not eliminate the rona then so finally the slower cousins, the B-lymphocytes eventually got going (adaptive immunity) and produced antibodies. Folks who have high Vit D levels; have heightened innate response; ie instant kill in the nostrils …….. and a depressed adaptive; so depressed adaptive means fewer inflammatory cytokines and REDUCED production of antibodies; .. yes REDUCED … look for “Shadrin et al.” in this article https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2870528/

      “The last test they had was last week, with the same result negative swab test but positive for antibodies 4 months after the first infection.” Not clear why one would keep looking for dead viral fragments amidst the general snot of someone’s nose 4 months after assumed exposure; is this what public dishealth uk advises? I am just curious

      a recent longitudinal study from Tokyo documented antibody levels disappearing, as folks recovered; was this patient of yours … obese, diabetic, hypertensive (so insulin-resistant and hyperinsulinaemic?) .. such folks were the ones who ended up in ICUs; and were the clearly co-morbid who were more affected by rona. Sadly nurses do now seem to tend towards obesity; as a general tendency one would suggest; all best wishes to you for your continuing care and careful scrutiny of your patients; your insight and compassion shine through.

      Reply
  13. Jess Driver

    See that is why you are a good doctor. Was the diagnosis just visual or by symptoms – if so you are a ‘case’. Can you have asymptomatic hangovers?

    Reply
    1. Steve-R

      Pedantically, the hangover is the Covid to the Lagavulin’s SARS-CoV-2 – you can avoid the hangover by correct hydration for example making the hydration the zinc ionophore

      Reply
  14. Joe Dopelle

    Dr Kendrick’s modesty is charming and a very fine personal quality. (I especially like the idea of him having been a spurt, and now being an ex-spurt).

    But I found Dr Zac’s frequent interruptions exasperating; also his habit of talking over Dr Kendrick.

    If he is going to inteview someone, he should ask them concise questions and then let them speak. Not grandstand himself.

    Reply
    1. elizabethhart

      I like Dr Zac and greatly appreciated this conversation between two medical people. Wonderful to see a genuine doctor and dentist have this open and frank conversation – wish there was a transcript.

      Dr Zac made useful and pertinent points for Malcolm to expand upon. Also useful that there was good camaraderie and banter which made the interview enjoyable to watch.

      Both Dr Kendrick and Dr Zac are very brave to speak out against the status quo, they are whistleblowers putting themselves on the line.

      Looking forward to seeing the open letter.

      Reply
  15. Joe Dopelle

    If anyone is having difficulty getting a video to play, one obvious thing to check is ad-blockers or similar software that stops scripts from running. (That’s just one step – there are many other causes).

    Reply
  16. Joe Dopelle

    At one point late in the interview, Dr Kendrick makes a mistake when he refers several times to “a new type of virus”. He then corrects himself, saying he means “a new type of vaccine”.

    However, surely this was his right brain (or subconscious) telling a deeper truth. If, as Dr Kendrick says, these new vaccines are designed to alter human DNA so that it creates viral DNA, they are behaving exactly like a virus in at least that respect.

    Reply
    1. elizabethhart

      Crikey, that’s an interesting thought…

      In the interview Malcolm says:

      This is not your normal vaccine. This is not how vaccines have ever worked in the past. The vaccine that’s being developed currently by Astrazeneca, and the Russian one, is going to alter your body’s DNA to create bits of virus that will then float around in the system that the body will then recognise…This is an alteration to the DNA structure of the human genome. This is a reverse transcriptase RNA vaccine. This is significant stuff.

      However, others say:

      A future RNA vaccine for COVID-19 would instruct cells to produce proteins that are hoped to “trigger an immune response that would then be able to kill the virus,” said an article in The Lancet from July 2020.

      However, it won’t genetically modify a human being because “the mRNA sequence doesn’t integrate into the genome, an organism’s complete set of DNA,” Dr. Gaetan Burgio, a geneticist and infectious researcher at the Australian National University in Canberra, told AAP FactCheck.

      Genetic modification requires “the deliberate insertion of foreign DNA into the nucleus of a human cell,” Mark Lynas, a visiting fellow at Cornell University’s Alliance for Science group, told Reuters, stressing that vaccines cannot do that.

      According to the WHO, a DNA vaccine “involves the direct introduction into appropriate tissues of a plasmid containing the DNA sequence encoding the antigen(s) against which an immune response is sought, and relies on the in situ production of the target antigen.”

      The statement also verifies that DNA vaccines do not incorporate into a person’s DNA. Instead, they stimulate the immune system to trigger appropriate responses against a disease.

      See: COVID-19 vaccine won’t change human DNA: experts. CGTN, 30 August 2020

      Can you please clarify your statement Malcolm, i.e. “This is an alteration to the DNA structure of the human genome.” Is this correct, as it appears to conflict with the advice in the article I quote from?

      Reply
        1. elizabethhart

          I haven’t got a clue… I’m not claiming to be an ‘expert’.

          I’m a person living in Australia with the threat of mandatory coronavirus vaccination looming, with a potential penalty for refusers of five years imprisonment and/or a $66,600 fine under the Australian Biosecurity Act 2015. Note that this emergency act is currently in force and has been since March, with repeated extensions, currently extended until December 2020, and who knows what after that – will it continue to be extended until ‘the vaccine’ is ready? It’s possible, because the recent Australian government budget forecasts for economic growth “are predicated on the assumption that COVID-19 outbreaks will be ‘largely contained’ and general social-distancing restrictions are assumed to continue until a vaccine is fully available“.[1]

          It’s outrageous that mandatory coronavirus vaccination is being threatened, that ‘our elected politicians’ are abusing their position to push this medical intervention for a virus that isn’t a threat to most people, and with vaccine products in the fast-tracked pipeline that are highly questionable.

          The lives and freedom of billions of people around the world are being manipulated by vested interests, and Bill Gates’ ‘race for coronavirus vaccines’, this is a political scandal of immense proportions. This. Is. Political. This is something those in the medical industry need to understand…it’s political… And people like me are mad as hell and demanding accountability, particularly from ‘the experts’.

          And among all the conflicting information, some people say coronavirus RNA vaccines will alter DNA, and others say they won’t…so who is correct? I don’t know, I want to know.

          And if the vaccines do alter DNA does this mean Gaetan Burgio, ANU; Mark Lynas, Cornell University; and the WHO, are lying?

          If they are, it needs to be called out.

          Reference:
          1. Budget 2020: Vaccine timeframe backs key forecasts. The Australian, 8 October 2020.

          Reply
          1. anglosvizzera

            “A future RNA vaccine for COVID-19 would instruct cells to produce proteins that are hoped to “trigger an immune response that would then be able to kill the virus” – is presumably referring to certain cells (ie immune cells) – or will it affect all cells?

            “However, it won’t genetically modify a human being because “the mRNA sequence doesn’t integrate into the genome, an organism’s complete set of DNA” – may well be true, as the “genome” would be all the DNA in a human and not just some cells, but how do they know which cells would be “instructed” to produce these proteins and that modification of parts of the human DNA genome thusly won’t have an adverse effect on the whole organism?

  17. alexadobree

    This was really interesting, but l too was exasperated by Dr Zac interrupting and repeatedly talking over Dr Kendrick – it was very annoying and he ruined the flow far too often, stopped some points getting made clearly (if at all) and was plainly showing off (and being a very poor interviewer)

    Reply
    1. Peter Downey

      Yeah, I though Zac was good but he was a little aggressive in interrupting. Interrupting generally occurs but I quickly got the impression he was never going to back away.
      Yes, Alex, I think I came away with the same feeling.

      Reply
  18. Cheezilla

    Dear Dr Kendrick
    I just wanted to thank you for your excellent talk with Dr Cox. You made so many important points very clearly and thoroughly. It’s always a pleasure to hear you speak. Thank you for sharing your wisdom.

    Reply
    1. Frango Asado

      It’s because the political system dictates that, Graham. Rather than choosing people for office based on their abilities and qualifications – and, very importantly, their character – we make it an elimination contest in which the weakest go to the wall. At every stage, from being selected as a candidate to being chosen Party leader, the principled, honest, and kind are passed over and the ruthless are picked.

      It’s rather like the way a pirate leader gets his job – by being more suspicious, cynical, distrustful and murderous than anyone else.

      The only country I know of where things are done rather differently is China. With over 5,000 years of civilisation behind them, and possibly the highest average intelligence of any people on Earth, they seem to have made the first important progress in government since… well, maybe since the ancient Mesopotamian kings of whom Michael Hudson has written.

      https://thesaker.is/why-are-western-leaders-gawd-awful-bad-and-chinas-so-darn-competent-part-i/
      http://thesaker.is/why-are-western-leaders-gawd-awful-bad-and-chinas-so-darn-competent-part-ii-china-rising-radio-sinoland-190807/
      https://www.schwartzreport.net/the-chinese-government-is-dominated-by-scientists-and-engineers/
      http://thesaker.is/upside-down-or-right-side-up-comparing-chinese-vs-western-civilizational-hierarchies/
      https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/12/26/98516/
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20178655

      Reply
  19. Leigh Gold

    It’s obvious that covid 19 has infected Liverpool F.C. How else can you explain the dire result v. Aston Villa? Naturally it doesn’t explain the drubbing Man Utd received from Spurs but, hey, you can’t blame the virus on everything. And if you think all the foregoing is ludicrous, well it’s no more ridiculous than the bovine excrement we’re all being subjected to by the government and the media.

    Reply
  20. Studs Ramrod

    That is excellent. Could listen to you all day but I agree, who prosecutes the prosecutors?
    You’re keeping my sanity during this covidbollox. Along with a few others.
    Both your books are my health “bibles”

    Reply
  21. Anonymous

    If there was not a pandemic but just a big economic crisis, we would also see many people going without life saving medical attention.

    Would it be more or fewer victims from just a big economic crisis, rather than the combination of crisis plus pandemic?

    As far as I know, we have never seen before a crisis where Governments are actively preventing economic recovery. This is one large uncharted territory.

    They are impeding the recovery because they have to save people from the disease, which is impossible in my opinion. Individuals may very well save their own lives. Politicians are incapable of saving anyone’s life. They are causing people to die. We have been seeing this for months now!

    Hysteria is not abating.

    We are allowing Governments to kill people because of a collective mental illness that we started and know not how to stop.

    But let us not despair. After all, there is not an infinite quantity of citizens to be killed. Eventually, the last Karen will die alone and then there will be no more hysteria. We have a bright future ahead!

    It is rather remarkable that in an age of almost instantaneous and cheap communication people are able to easily learn what the problem is and yet we cannnot organise ourselves. I understand now that the ultimate purpose of Politics is to turn people against each other and render them hopeless, helpless and extremely vulnerable.

    Reply
    1. Fumbletrumpet

      Seems a bit harsh for poor Karen, in your vision of the future there Anon ! Hope things turn out better for those with other names !
      I think what you’re trying to say is that economic crises have profoundly detrimental physical and mental health outcomes, regardless of any concurrent, seemingly un-related mass public health issues. And on that I agree. If only because good healthcare almost always requires a good economy in order to deliver it.
      As to whether a Government is actively preventing an economic recovery, I think of course the situation does look quite a lot like that at the moment. But it’s far from being a recent, one time only phenomenen. The ‘great recession’ of 2008 – 12 and on (did we actually, really, recover from it before Covid came along ?) really only started to recover (in my view anyway) once the Government had (eventually) decided to intervene by stepping in to back the banks in their return to more lenient lending policies once again. That sort of started to happen, slowly, a little bit, with a change of Government flavour in 2010, and then only having any effect from perhaps sometime in 2012. But for the years in between not much was done to make things any better really.

      Reply
  22. Rob Elens | Centrum de Peel

    Hello, video doesnt start

    Van: Dr. Malcolm Kendrick
    Verzonden: dinsdag 6 oktober 2020 18:51
    Aan: Rob Elens | Centrum de Peel
    Onderwerp: [New post] A podcast on Covid

    Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A couple of days ago I had a chat with Dr Zac Cox about all things Covid. Which wondered about a bit, and does last for an hour and a half, we were enjoying ourselves. Sorry for my hungover look. I was a bit hungover. However, even though it is a bit lon”

    Reply
    1. tonyP

      Sorry Rudi. Not normal.
      This ‘declaration’ patronises older people. They should not be ‘protected’ but allowed, indeed encouraged, to use their own judgement. If they are prepared to venture out into everyday society to do their shopping etc. then that’s fine.

      If, like me, you are an 81 year old and feel fit and keep your vit D topped up, then keep going!
      If any big pharma think they are developing a vaccine for my sake – forget it. Not in my name.

      Reply
  23. Jean Humphreys

    Thanks for the podcast. I wonder if I shall ever be able to watch it – our internet is such that I have been unable to download and watch anything, not even totally uncontroversial stuff like knitting techniques. I ring the surgery and hear that I must see the doctor online, which is another way of saying “Get lost, you annoying little sick person” So I am going to have to imagine what would have been encouraging and helpful.

    Reply
    1. Joe Dopelle

      Surgeries, like hospitals, have been closed to sick people for months. Why, they might bring their diseases into the NHS and infect the wonderful people there! Better to keep the NHS’s powder dry ready for the truly appalling plague that might just be about the burst on us at any moment.

      I am reminded of Major Major Major Major in Joseph Heller’s novel “Catch-22”. Apart from his amusing name (he is a major in the US Army, but the remaining three “Major”s are the result of his father’s odd sense of humour) he has one idiosyncracy: a paralyzing aversion to other people.

      Thus his secretary is strictly instructed that he can be seen only by appointment. Appointments can be made freely – but only for times when he is not in his office.

      Reply
    2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

      You could use a utility like Clipgrab to actually download the file – and if you chose mp3 or a smaller size mp4 it would be a smaller file and quicker to download. However, once on your computer you can then play it.
      While visual may be preferred – an audio of the talk would be fine as there are no presentations.
      https://clipgrab.org/
      If you go to the site and copy the URL of the video – then click clipgrab in the menubar – it autfills it and you choose the setting and click ‘grab this click’.
      This facility may also be useful for videos you might otherwise watch later – but now suspect they wont be there later.

      Another constructive feedback – Zac is loud and Malcolm a bit quiet. there are ways to equalise this – and make it all optimal sound levels.

      Regardless any critical feedback to the technical aspects or to Zac’s overzealous interruptions or tendency to take the words from Malcolm’s mouth or suddenly redirect the conversation, I appreciated listening in and am not critical form a sense of entitlement – bit of learning as we go.

      Reply
  24. Suzay Grenis

    Links are not working, please check them, so we can check your stuff out.

    On Tue, Oct 6, 2020 at 9:51 AM Dr. Malcolm Kendrick wrote:

    > Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A couple of days ago I had a chat with Dr > Zac Cox about all things Covid. Which wondered about a bit, and does last > for an hour and a half, we were enjoying ourselves. Sorry for my hungover > look. I was a bit hungover. However, even though it is a bit lon” >

    Reply
  25. Mark Christopher Wilson

    Hi Malcolm.
    You are a saint, but the link doesn’t work!
    Thanks for everything you are doing to keep us sane…
    Mark

    Reply
  26. Jeremy May

    Very interesting. I just wish more folk would understand what a mess we’re making if this.
    You look to have sobered up by the end Dr.
    In fact the whole thing is sobering.

    Reply
  27. Damien Sanderson

    Re: RNA Vaccine issues . . . The vehicle to get the portion of Covid-19 RNA into our cells is a non-pathogenic adenovirus shell. One issue published is that a significant number of people have an immune system that protects against adenoviruses and this compromises the effectiveness of RNA acquisition in those individuals. Will they have to find a range of vehicles?

    A second thought not published: My understanding of how T cells mature in the thymus is that T cells develop an enormous – near random – range of antigen (peptide) receptors on their surface. These T cell receptors are tested against epithelial cells of the thymus which present – on their surface – samples of the epithelial cell’s own peptides – self-peptides. If the T cell binds with these self-protein peptides then the T cell is set on a path of destruction. In this way you do not end up producing loads of T cells that react to your own proteins causing auto-immune disease. Only T cells that get through the thymus – without their T-cell antigen receptors coming across self-peptide surface complexes – have the chance of surviving to join the immune system.

    If the adenovirus gets into the egg/sperm cells then the offspring’s thymus will selectively get rid of any T cells that might be protective against COVID 19.

    (Just a thought)

    Reply
    1. Carole

      Sorry I’m not understanding your point about offspring and T cells. No immunity to Covid potentially like now, an inability to ever have immunity to Covid or auto immune issues?

      Reply
  28. David Bailey

    That was a fascinating discussion, Malcolm – I am still listening to it all in sections.

    I just hope you have been invited to give a presentation to the SAGE committee.

    Just to pick up one point, you described how several of your patients showed a very low oxygen saturation (70%) and that these patients died extremely fast without any breathlessness. I remember you discussing the same issue in a blog several centuries ago!

    This made me wonder if people may have been ill with something else as well as testing positive for CV19 – because I am sure they were not tested for anything else once they were found to be CV19 positive. Could some of the mystery behind this virus be that another infection – maybe not even a virus – was involved as well?

    Reply
    1. Steve-R

      I pondered this a while back while reading about autopsies revealing clotting occluding various peripheral parts, there were also patients presenting with no pulse in extremities (typically fingers).
      So, if there is no pulse does this manifest in low blood oxygen when it is adequate in the ‘important’ parts. But as clotting is widespread are the very sudden deaths caused by clots in the aforesaid ‘important’ bits. From what I understand, very few autopsies have been carried out on patients fitting the experience you describe to solve the paradox.

      Reply
      1. Terry Wright

        Hi Steve-R

        folks want to ascribe to our little friend; the shy and retiring rona;

        all sorts of superman properties:

        humans are much less healthy than … 40yrs ago.

        Rates of diabetes, obesity, heart disease and the amalgam of those: metabolic syndrome .. they are all high.
        Many thanks to the USDA “what to eat” advice that tells folks to poison themselves on carbohydrates and fructose.

        So a diabetic; or pre-diabetic (as many are); have heightened inflammatory markers; so they are like dry tinder; ready to explode on the smallest provocation;

        I would strongly suggest to you:

        it ain’t the virus: it is the sick host ..

        Reply
  29. dearieme

    Dear Doc, please remove all the posts complaining that your link didn’t work, and your replies. They make the thread damn near unreadable. An explanatory “update” to the blog post should cover the case.

    Reply
  30. Bill H

    Malcolm,

    Good Man.

    Have read your blog for a couple of years and have your books.

    Keep up the good work in calling out the scoundrels who walk among us. It must be a hard road, but you have right on your (our) side.

    Aye

    Bill

    The video played. Fine for me.

    Reply
  31. gypsyrozbud

    There is a lot of information (ie, facts) on The Corona Scandal regarding a class action suit Being brought together by a group of German lawyers after interviewing countless scientists and doctors. Shocking, really! Thank you to the commenter above who gave this link! You can view the 50 minute video on Armstrong Economics and also the Agora.com website, along with countless other documentations regarding the COVID Fear mongering!

    Reply
  32. Sue Richardson

    Nothing very exciting to say except that I can open OK Dr K. Will watch it later and enjoy. Just thought i would let you know.

    Reply
  33. elizabethhart

    It’s notable that in the UK, according to a Financial Times report, UK British COVID vaccine taskforce head Kate Bingham says: “There’s going to be no vaccination of people under 18. It’s an adult-only vaccine, for people over 50, focusing on health workers and care home workers and the vulnerable.” *

    * Less than half UK population to receive coronavirus vaccine, says task force head. Financial Times, 5 October 2020.

    Reply
      1. elizabethhart

        Wow, AhNotepad, what a hugely important interview, thanks for sharing. (Note that a transcript is also accessible on the video.)

        This is so huge….it takes your breath away…

        ‘Our governments’ are our enemy…they’ve been taken over by fifth columnists.

        It is so shocking and horrible, it’s evil… These governments are committing treason against the people, who is pulling the strings?

        These Augean stables must be cleaned out…

        Reply
  34. elizabethhart

    Another interesting article…

    Herd immunity could have saved more lives than lockdown, study suggests: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/10/07/herd-immunity-could-have-saved-lives-lockdown-study-suggests/

    Some quotes:

    Blanket social distancing and the closure of schools may have cost more lives than if herd immunity had been allowed to build slowly in the community, a study suggests.

    A reanalysis of the Imperial University modelling that led to lockdown in March shows that shutting schools and preventing youngsters from mingling may have had the counterintuitive effect of actually killing more people.

    In a study published in the BMJ, Edinburgh University predicted that over the entire course of the pandemic, keeping children out of classrooms would increase deaths by between 80,000 and 95,000. Likewise, social distancing of everyone, rather than just the over-70s, could cost between 149,000 and 178,000 lives.

    Experts say the virus was able to spread faster to vulnerable people once lockdown measures were introduced than if some level of immunity had been allowed to build up in the young.

    Reply
    1. Dan Anderson

      That may be true, or not, in general, but in my individual case, we two medically & age vulnerable great grandparents living with our 5 yo kindergartner were pleased that he did not have to attend classroom lessons, thus reducing our exposure.
      That said, from this lesson I would learn that protecting the vulnerable by government policy & expense would be smarter than trying to protect the whole of society. Our great grandson could have been given leeway to stay home to study while others. That logic supposes experts can discern what groups are at risk. I recall that the elderly were most vulnerable and identified as such in March.

      Reply
  35. Studs Ramrod

    Question – With revenue from statins drying up, do you think that the big pharma have had to invent another condition to keep the revenues up. Forcing us to take coronavirus vaccines and medications?

    Reply
  36. Nigella P

    That was such a good interview, I found it so helpful and for the first time understood the false negative thing properly. When I see lots of numbers I panic and think I’ll never make sense of it, but the spoken word holds no such fears, so at last I understand it and could explain it to someone else!

    However, what I do not understand is the casedemic panic going on at the moment. What the hell is going on? Why are all the European nations getting their knickers in such a twist – surely the epidemiologists and public health officials all knew that if they stopped everyone moving around via a lockdown and therefore the spread of the virus, when they released everyone again the virus would spread again? Am I missing something here? Did they really think the virus would just disappear if society shut up shop for a couple of months? I thought the point of the lockdown was to ‘protect’ the NHS from being overwhelmed. Haven’t we proven that the NHS wasn’t overwhelmed – so what are all the new restrictions about now? It seems clear to me that they aren’t even working well anyway as the parts of the country with the greatest restrictions seem to have some of the highest virus rates anyway. I feel convinced that I must be missing something and not understanding what the plan is, because nothing that is being done by the Government now makes any sense at all to me.

    Reply
    1. David Bailey

      Nigella,

      My feeling is that there was a certain VERY NAIVE sense to the lockdown concept. If you could totally isolate people for long enough, they would all get the disease, then become immune to the disease, and the virus would die off.

      That is pretty naive, but clearly it fooled a lot of politicians – most of whom have very little technical knowledge – they just run the country! Increasingly politicians may come from activist groups of various sorts, or they may be chosen because they belong to a minority of one sort or another.

      OK now what is wrong with naive lockdown theory? I suppose it might work for some diseases – particularly if everyone could lockdown in their own spacecraft supplied with enough food, energy etc to last them for 6 months (say).

      Back in the real world, no lockdown is total, so some people simply have to mix – not everyone could get their food delivered, some people had to go to work to keep all sorts of things running, etc.

      The problem with an imperfect lockdown is that as soon as people meet others again, the virus simply starts to spread again in a population that is still susceptible!

      Reply
      1. KJE

        And you’d need to do the whole world at the same time with no access to fresh air as history suggests that viruses spread from country to country faster than sea travel, long before we had air travel

        Reply
      2. Frango Asado

        “If you could totally isolate people for long enough, they would all get the disease, then become immune to the disease, and the virus would die off”.

        Actually, that is what happens with the traditional approach – essentially, do nothing disruptive, treat people who fall ill, and advise the vulnerable to take whatever appropriate measures they deem prudent.

        The “total isolation” bit makes not the slightest difference. If you totally isolate every single person, everyone will get the virus. If you don’t do anything, everyone will get the virus.

        Oh, and some people who get the virus will die. That is how Nature has made sure the Earth doesn’t get cluttered up by ancient people 20 feet deep. Everyone dies of something, although progressive do-gooders seem to feel that is unsatisfactory.

        Reply
    2. Dan Anderson

      The first reaction outside China was to prevent the virus from entry.
      The next action was to test, trace and eradicate the virus.
      The next goal was to not overwhelm healthcare — flatten the curve.
      At that point, the hope was to slow the spread until a treatment and vaccine was found. That’s the scenario as I saw it unfold.

      Reply
  37. Binra (@onemindinmany)

    I enjoyed listening to Malcolm – but had to bear with Zac interrupting Malcolm loudly and on a different purpose. Zac felt more involved in establishing opinion, and at times effectively censored Malcolm. Zac hardly recognised that he did this even while SAYING he wanted to listen to Malcolm – (as an ‘expert’ or better as an informed researcher and investigator).
    This split between saying and doing is itself symptomatic of a collective cognitive dissonance.

    Dr Andrew Kaufman was mentioned by Zac, and quickly avoided. Regardless the conclusions of Dr Kaufman, the means and method of his research and findings are open, accountable and reasoned. In a recent interview with Dr Tom Cowan, Tom Cowan pitched his comments in a ‘matey’ way which was not unrelated to enjoying the company of one held in high esteem and affection, but Kaufman – without any unfriendliness, stayed very focused in the issues being raised. Cowan’s new book is right now being burned (metaphorically) by Amazon and as far as I know all other booksellers. Book Depository refunded my order without comment.
    I appreciate them both for their respective willingness to give witness to true account regardless the ‘incentivised’ correctness or narrative dictate. (As I do Malcolm).

    But I sense that Zac is leaning into his own sense of risk in inviting Malcolm for a discussion to be shared out to a public view. So despite my sense of an uptight Zac forgetting to listen – or allowing his emotional reaction to run away with him – I thank Zac also. Practice is the best way to learn, and errors recognised, are the feedback to serves a better outcome and experience all round.

    The real Economy is our life support as a human social interaction with our needs.
    The fake economy is the nature of what underlies this debt-driven control mechanism.

    I was listening in on something else yesterday in which the following sentiment was expressed: (paraphrased)
    “Bankers initiate and support and nurture destructive actions and events to bring others into debt and therefore control, over nations and their peoples”.
    That’s probably as deep as one can go in worldly terms, but beneath this are fundamental spiritual truths that are overridden and hidden by such a sense of control – which delivers false profits upon false premises.
    Transparency, accountability and communication within us, are the basis for relationships founded in mutual respect and indeed honouring of life as it is, and as we accept and align in. Truth simply is, but our awareness of truth may be filtered, distorted or blocked. When we are out of true, we meet every kind of dissonance or adversity, and this can be a basis for deeper willingness to listen, instead of whack-a-mole.

    Commenters:
    Links not bringing up a page can also be part of a censorship by stealth and plausible deniability.
    At present, one may route around by opening the link in alternative browsers or using a VPN. However independence in any tech company may be more of a marketing term than a fact.

    The Net is aptly named.
    But the more decontextualised communication becomes as the means to transfer information, the less is truly communicated. A qualitative shift has more power to realign the Economy to health than a quantitative contraction working destructively. Zach Bush has an articulation of this.
    The object model lends itself to the pathogenic actor, and polarised depletion or wasted energy.
    A contextual appreciation which corresponds to terrain theory in total, is also a participance.
    To participate in our own health, life and relationships is not a slave, robot or living tool, nor seeking to use others to pump up our own lack of substance or fear of exposure to loss of face, validity and right.

    Reply
  38. The Dim Appear

    I haven’t watched all of the video yet but so far it’s great.

    I read Doctoring Data during the lockdown and I found it easy to read and understand and enlightening.

    I’m of the opinion that the global covid response is geared mostly to bringing in the environmental agenda that’s going in to overdrive about at the minute.

    What colour do you good people mostly associate with naïvety?

    Reply
    1. Jerome Savage

      Might seem like an unlikely scenario but (always a but) given we can be passionate about our environment, nature in all its glory & given that we are consciously and unconsciously slicing away at it with the word pristine no longer really currency & given that we long for those far off pristine places, clear waters friendly earthy natives at one with nature etc etc and given that the meganaires (my own word – more than a billionaire but not quite a trillionaire) who seek such pristinity (oops another new word) find themselves on far off islands on their mega yachts with plastics of many hues & shapes washing up on not so pristine beaches and the great romantic cities no longer great but full of earthy human flotsam washed by the magnet of money is it possible that the meganairs ain’t happy about that ? My my, am I such a C.S. ? I’ll say nuthin !

      Reply
  39. anglosvizzera

    The link worked perfectly for me a couple of days ago.

    However, as others have said, it was more of a ‘conversation’ than an ‘interview’ but I was a bit peeved that Dr Zac butted in when you were about to talk about Japan. What were you going to say? I know that they used a similar strategy to Sweden and the arguments against Sweden that are being used is that it’s less densely populated etc, unlike Japan.

    Would like to hear what you were about to say!!

    Reply
    1. Jeremy May

      I put forward the ‘Sweden being less populated’ suggestion on a previous thread. Dr K replied that it doesn’t hold water because the population is very concentrated in urban areas.

      Reply
  40. Fumbletrumpet

    Thank you Drs K & C for an entertaining, curiously reassuring angle on the virus and our response to it.
    Here’s what’s been puzzling me (previous version of my view didn’t pass moderation – perhaps too long ? Will try to be more concise !):
    Great Barrington Declaration suggests that the vulnerable shield while the less vulnerable go out into the world, take their chances and hopefully develop some sort of herd immunity.
    This was immediately rejected by the Government and many others of more influence than and who certainly know more than I.
    The only other strategy we seem to have therefore is lockdowns, constraints, controls – policies that don’t from pure stats anyway, seem to have worked very well so far. Thousands face/suffer job losses and only more severe restrictions being offered in their wake. (Poorer, desperate people are more likely to take greater risks anyway, to survive, aren’t they ?)
    All this is an orchestrated fudge to try and relieve pressure on the NHS until some magical, mystical vaccine arrives. We don’t know when. Indications are around six more months. Maybe longer. We don’t know if it will even work.
    But then we’re told that only 50% or less of us will be entitled to the vaccine, when it arrives, anyway.
    So, reasoning, even WITH a vaccine available, a great many of us (of working age shall we say, without vulnerable factors) will have to rely on some sort of herd immunity/distancing/infecting/re-infecting process anyway !
    Errr……what’s the point in doing anything other than Barrington – and ‘getting on with it’ ?
    As I often seem to be concluding comments – am I missing something here ?

    Reply
    1. KJE

      No, I don’t think you are missing anything. Another interesting fact is that the poorer the area, the more likely it is to have a local lockdown (and Labour voters). Now that could be because a poor areas have a worse diet and therefore poorer overall health, so more likely to trigger positive tests – but I prefer the Labour voter theory

      Reply
    2. Jeremy May

      Dr K had some pretty alarming things to say about a potential vaccine (towards the end of the interview), particularly, If I’ve got it right, with regard to alteration of DNA and wholly inadequate testing.

      Reply
  41. Fumbletrumpet

    Hello
    Does anyone know the word/character limit for comments here please ?
    I’ve tried twice to post a comment about lockdown/Great Barrington/vaccine and seem to have failed moderation. Same happened when I tried to comment on a different post a while ago.
    I doubt it’s because I’m being offensive or too controversial.
    But it may be that I’m being boring (or, perhaps, just too wordy) ?
    Any advice gratefully received.
    Thanks

    Reply
    1. Fumbletrumpet

      Ooops, sorry yes. Probably was a bit tedious, but thanks for posting my comment as above. Similar vein to many others I’m sure. But thankful anyway for the opportunity to have my say during such frustrating times.

      Reply
    2. Prudence Kitten

      I’ve had similar experiences. In fact, it has now reached the point where if I comment under my real name and email, the comment is NEVER published. I checked with Dr Kendrick, and it is not his doing.

      Someone between my keyboard and Dr Kendrick’s blog has decided not to let me publish any comments. Luckily, one just needs to supply fake name and email. For the time being…

      Reply
      1. Fumbletrumpet

        Thanks Prudence
        Appreciate your comment.
        I’m not a medical person (although my wife is. And she often sees things differently to me – Covid or other conditions). But, as with many on forums like this, I find the logic/sense/philosophy of authorities’ responses to the epidemic to be utterly baffling (that’s my polite term) !
        So, as I rage around the home at each new twist and turn, reading and commenting online has become a valuable outlet. Even though I know it achieves little more than the reassurance I’m not alone in my conclusions (for which I’m really very grateful).
        But I am a bit wordy. So it’s good to know that this is a ‘system’ thing, not outright censure on wordiness or anything else.

        Reply
  42. Dan Anderson

    The good Dr. Kendrick was good, but the host did not enhance
    Kendrick’s standing by appearing. Kendrick could have done youtube without the guy,
    had a clear message, would not have to correct the host. Maybe the
    host Dr. Ozz, er ah, Dr. first name has a big audience and he did plug
    Kendrick’s two books, but the host came across as a cheerleader for
    whatever it is he pushes, enthusiasm(?) offering nothing more than
    vitamins to the conversation, and lots of laughing ridicule. He had the loud mike and interrupted when he should have stayed quiet. Dr. Kendrick left great openings for the host to explore MK’s path to being a skeptic, critic and free thinker, but ignored the opportunities. I can’t’ recall one thing he added to the conversation other than the format and audience. If not for Dr. Zac I would put this on conversation FB to share. My thought at the end was that Dr. Kendrick should avoid such association. Still, watch the 90 minutes just to hear the good doctor. He’s worth his time on the show.

    Reply
  43. Ray Whitcombe

    Hello,

    Firstly may I say that I agree with your standpoint and appreciated the ‘Conversation’, and your insights into modern medical practice + its failings.

    Secondly about myself. I fall well into the stereotyped medical / political definition of ‘Old & Vulnerable’ as I’m in my 78th Year and obviously of little further use? To counter that position I consider myself to be 78 Years Young and together with my extended family am living an eventful and BUSY life! My Wife also falls into the same category.

    I was in part time employment upto the days before ‘Lockdown’, and I offered my resignation in early March – receiving my P45 dated March 15 2020 !! I was an Electronics Engineer, and moved to part time – Zero Hours contract – lately as they required my ‘legacy’ knowledge to assist in the transition to new technologies. As in your field a ‘Cold’ is a ‘Cold’ and its as well to base new treatments on the data built up over the Years.

    My resignation was due to Political & Ethical reasons. The Covid Panic was on the horizon and HM Gov.uk seemed a bit lost? The company I worked for was / is a major contractor for said Gov’, and didn’t seem to see what was round the corner, in fact referring to the Covid thing a just a passing panic!
    Well a panic certainly, but unfortunately not ‘just passing’.

    I have signed the The Great Barrington Declaration and see no problem with their stance in ’shielding’ the venerable. They do not ask for the compulsory detention of the vulnerable, only support when required, especially in care homes and hospitals where I agree it is badly needed. The sentence “People who are more at risk may participate if they wish, while society as a whole enjoys the protection conferred upon the vulnerable by those who have built up herd immunity.” covers my case I am more than able to risk access myself. To quote a well known poem:-

    I am the master of my fate
    I am the captain of my soul.

    Finally may I say that I feel cheated and short changed by the Medical + Governmental hype that until recently has promoted the idea of a long and active life well into the 80’s +++ and even the state retirement age being raised into the 70’s by the 2040’s, or thereabouts. Now you seem to be considered past your sell by date at 65 and even 45 appearing in some recommendations !! So it seems that the old lifetime of “Three Score Years and Ten” has come back ?

    PS: By the way I have avoided prescription medicine (Big Pharma stuff) from an early age. At primary school (1950’s) I had a skin infection for which I was sent home. Our GP then gave me a course of Penicillin injections which did nothing. Mum wishing me to return to school persuaded the GP to refer me to a specialist, who on a quick inspection diagnosed Ring Worm, a fungal infection – from our ’new’ cat. This was in the lecture theatre of a teaching hospital and there was much ‘mirth’ about the inexperience of GP’s!!! to put it mildly.

    Thanks again

    Reply
  44. Paul Helman,MD

    Well worth listening to. The difference between infection and clinical caze could have been fleshed out as you did in your recent blog. This is widely and grievously misunderstood. Along with IMR and CMR we need long term morbidity rates.

    Reply
  45. anna m

    My daughter works in the security administration of a university. What they have been doing at universities is making thousands of kids take tests, announcing some few hundred “cases” and locking schools back down.
    I am wondering if the following scenario is common, either here in the US or in Europe, to wit:
    Only freshman are allowed on campus, and they are not allowed to go off campus. They live in dorms, but have no room mate. The cafeteria was closed. They must take their food and go. They must wear masks even when outside. They may not socialize. They are scolded for being selfish if they are caught near another student.
    So their daily routine is one of near total isolation, no fun, no friends, and alone in their rooms. Eating alone. Their most basic human impulses are shamed.

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      anna m, We still have people in the UK phoning into radio chat shows complaining the reason “the virus is spreading” is because of others “not following the rules”. The have no idea of the stupidity of their argument.

      What you have described is defined as torture in warfare. and thus illegal. Whoever is inflicting it should be prosecuted and re-educated.

      Reply
      1. anna m

        Yes, AH, in prison you have to be very bad to get solitary confinement. This is not quite that bad in that you have a lot more area to walk around, and I guess they are attending class so can see other people. But it is a soft form of solitary confinement nonetheless. I imagine these kids calling their parents in tears, begging to come home. I believe they pay in advance for the semester. And the weird thing is, my guess is that these universities are committing suicide. Don’t they see that? Lots of online learning, with credit, is available much cheaper. People go to university for a reason. Not to be made suicidally depressed and lonely.

        Reply
        1. Frango Asado

          “Yes, AH, in prison you have to be very bad to get solitary confinement”.

          Like Julian Assange, who is imprisoned for… oh yes, revealing to the world the ghastly crimes (including murder, torture and genocide) of the US and UK governments.

          VERY bad.

          Reply
  46. The Dim Appear

    I won’t be signing the Great Barring Declaration (GBD) although I was initially tempted. I think everyone should go back to life as normal, except I don’t think it will ever be going back to what I thought of as normal.

    Let EVERYONE be free to return to life right now even those who are considered elderly and vulnerable if they choose. If the elderly and vulnerable want to keep away and shield then provide for that, but the choice is THEIRS alone.

    I don’t doubt that everyone who is a party to or signs GBD is genuine and caring and has the best of intentions but from what I’ve read about GBD there are suggestions that those who will be categorised as ‘elderly and vulnerable’ whatever that means will be locked away for three months initially. There are probably many reasons why this would be extended both in terms of who is classified as elderly and vulnerable and the lockaway period.

    When you have economic decline and you start classifying people as somehow ‘less strong’ than the rest of the population I believe nothing but enormous mistakes will come of it.

    In my opinion this covid response is lurching from one horror to another. It needs to be stopped.

    Reply
    1. David Bailey

      I could technically be classed as vulnerable because of my age – 71 – and I have no intention of obeying an order to shelter in place! Many others would not, and in practice I think this can only be advisory. People my age tend to be a bit more independent – we can’t be bullied by an employer, and we have seen a lot of life.

      Reply
      1. Joe Dopelle

        If this goes on… (title of a short story by Heinlein) they may have to kill us to keep us safe.

        Like that village in Vietnam.

        Which goes to show: if citizens are foolish and lazy enough to let their government commit hideous crimes abroad, sooner or later it will start doing so at home.

        Reply
    2. anna m

      Dim,

      Didn’t they specify that it would be voluntary? But I agree with you if not. The protection being given to patients in nursing homes worries me, because again, they never let up as I initially thought they would once the crest of the wave passed. There are old people who have not had a visitor in 6 months. This could kill them. The psychological cruelty of this whole thing increasingly impresses me. See my post above.

      Reply
  47. Astrogeezer

    I’m an astronomer not an astrologer, but I predict that within a few weeks the population will be coerced into submitting to vaccination. The diabolical absence of approval of vitamin D3, even the outright denial of its efficacy by the oxymoronic ‘SAGE’, leaves no doubt that there is an underlying agenda. The vitamin is Amazon/Tesco/Morrison’s ‘dirt’ cheap but the AstraZeneca vaccine, already bought and paid for by the government, aka the taxpayer, cost £millions. Terrify the population and they will clamour for vaccination, even though testing will not have been completed thoroughly for months yet, and naturally we will all be invited to sign non-culpability declarations 😆. If there’s one thing the government, their scientific advisers and the submissive media have achieved, it is the undoubtedly successful terror campaign they have waged.

    Reply
  48. elizabethhart

    People in Victoria Australia now have to wear a fitted face mask when they leave home, not bandanas or scarves.

    For example:

    Why should I wear a fitted face mask?

    You must wear a fitted face mask covering your nose and mouth when you are leaving your home, unless you have a lawful reason for not doing so.

    As restrictions ease and movement increases, the effectiveness of a face mask is even more important.

    Wearing a face mask helps keep you and others safe, and will help us reach COVID Normal. Coronavirus (COVID-19) is spread from close contact with a person with coronavirus (COVID-19). Face masks help stop droplets spreading when someone speaks, laughs, coughs, or sneezes, including someone who has coronavirus (COVID-19) but feels well.

    The best way to protect other people against coronavirus (COVID-19) is keeping 1.5 metres apart, wash your hands often, and cough or sneeze into your elbow or tissue. Face masks are an additional protective physical barrier to protect you and your loved ones.

    See further details here: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/face-masks-vic-covid-19#what-is-changing

    I can’t see any references provided to back this edict.

    Reply
    1. anglosvizzera

      On Del Bigtree’s HighWire show last night, he had a couple of experts on PPI who train doctors etc on how to wear them. They said that when doing an assessment for masks in the workplace, they have to do CO2 checks etc to ensure that they aren’t going to cause adverse health effects through their use and that it’s illegal not to go through that process. A few weeks ago, Del demonstrated, on his son, the very high CO2 readings from wearing different types of mask for a few minutes using a proper meter. He was lambasted by some who said his ‘test’ wasn’t valid. However, these two women said he absolutely did it correctly, just as they’d been trained. They were so frustrated that people are being told to wear a mask or face covering without knowing whether it is detrimental to their health, and that they are of no use either to protect oneself or others from this virus. They also emphasised the risk of increasing one’s personal viral load if actually wearing one and being infected!!

      Reply
    2. Mark Wilson

      They’re all absolutely mad. I have been walking in the wilds of Leeds LS6 just now, and healthy students swerve to pass me, wearing their face-masks in the open air. I was just so sad about how they are ever going to live life and face up to any risks. I thought back quickly to when I was their age (1980) and at the time I was working at NCB Grimethorpe Colliery. I think they would have evaporated in fear.

      Reply
    3. Frango Asado

      Notice how the simple question is simply not answered?

      “Why should I wear a fitted face mask?”

      “You must wear a fitted face mask covering your nose and mouth when you are leaving your home, unless you have a lawful reason for not doing so… Wearing a face mask helps keep you and others safe”.

      Translation:

      Q: “Why must I wear a mask?”

      A: “You must wear a mask”.

      Reply
  49. Martin Back

    Given the fact that Vitamin D is protective against Covid, and cholesterol is a precursor to the manufacture of Vitamin D in the skin, I wondered if statins, which lower cholesterol, might decrease Vitamin D and thus increase the chance of dying of Covid. From the data I am able to find, it appears from eyeballing the graph that there is no relationship between statin use and Covid death.

    – Statin use in year 2000 from https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/technical_reports/2010/RAND_TR830.pdf
    – Covid deaths 07/10/2020 from https://www.statista.com/statistics/1111779/coronavirus-death-rate-europe-by-country/

    Reply
    1. LA_Bob

      Hi, Martin,

      I kind of doubt the Finns, the Swedes, and the Norwegians get much vitamin D from sun exposure of their skin, so I’m not sure the statin-cholesterol-vitamin D connection, if any, will hold in all situations.

      Seems like we should start with vitamin D levels per country vs COVID deaths. I haven’t looked, but I’d guess that information is very hard to come by.

      Reply
          1. LA_Bob

            Yes, and the question implied in my comment above is, How much, if at all, do cholesterol-lowering statins affect ingested vitamin D?

            Turns out the answer may be complicated. Google “vitamin d supplements and statins” (without quotes), and you’ll get some hits suggesting there are statins that actually raise vitamin D levels. For example,

            https://www.medindia.net/patientinfo/link-between-statins-and-vitamin-d.htm

            Now I’m skeptical about this, but what do I know? Might take awhile to sort it all out.

      1. Jerome Savage

        Report from earlier in the year that questions use of statins (& ACE inhibitor)during the Pandemic
        Extract
        “clinicians need to decide on an individual basis if an ACE-inhibitor should be substituted for an ARB for blood pressure control and if statin treatment should be halted during the pandemic, particularly if statins are being used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Attention
        to this might save countless lives”
        https://doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcaa103

        Reply
  50. Sue Richardson

    Watched the interview and found it very illuminating. You would think by now that Boris and his Merry Men would be beginning to wonder if their particular ‘Experts’ might possibly be barking up the wrong tree. The media seem to me to be in control of the fear and panic, and there appears to be signs of awakening from my read of the Daily Mail today. it also looks as though more and more people, both laymen and doctors, are beginning to wonder about it all. People I speak to are questioning what’s happening, and they are by no means ‘conspiracy theorists’, just ordinary people who want their lives back. Keep plugging away Doc.

    Reply
    1. Frango Asado

      “You would think by now that Boris and his Merry Men would be beginning to wonder if their particular ‘Experts’ might possibly be barking”.

      That version reads just as well, and is crisper.

      Reply
  51. PamSandy Nichols

    Could not open this…tried several times. I think it was taken down from the internet !? Bad times now

    Reply

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