More COVID19 news from Sweden

A few weeks ago, an emergency physician working in Sweden, Dr. Sebastian Rushworth, asked me if I would be willing to replicate an article from his blog on mine. I was more than happy; it was a great article. The only problem being that his writing puts mine to shame – in a second language. Although he did later tell me he had been to boarding school in England for several years. So, I feel a bit better. If not much.

He has now done an update, outlining how things are getting along in Sweden. I thought it would be of great interest for people to get news from the front line, so to speak.

As many of us know Sweden, alone in Western Europe, decided not to impose a tough lockdown. In fact, the only forcible restriction that was imposed was to ban people meeting in groups of more than fifty. Slightly later, a further restriction was placed on nursing home visits.

Apart from this, all other Government recommendations were purely voluntary [Imagine that, a Government treating its citizens as responsible human beings].

When Sebastian wrote to me recently, I sent him back this e-mail.

“Great article. Could you send it in Word format? I will obviously link back to your blog.

Also, would it be possible to put in an additional section – to go at the front of the piece – as to what measures were taken in Sweden, and what the average person in Sweden actually did. The narrative we now have (from the pro-Lockdown lobby) is that the people of Sweden, being so law-abiding and community aware, essentially locked themselves down.

Which meant that the Swedish partial lockdown was more effective than, for example, the UK ‘harsh’ lockdown. Because the Swedes self-policed themselves, and the Brits did not. This is usually stated with great confidence from people who provide no evidence to back this assertion up. People who have probably never been to Sweden, nor ever talked to anyone from Sweden, and probably couldn’t point to Sweden on a map.

I understand schools stayed open, bars and restaurants stayed open. Gatherings of more than five hundred people were prohibited etc. What did Swedes do with masks, and going to work, for example? I think that information directly from the front line in Sweden, on these things, would be useful for people to know.”

So, Sebastian added a bit onto the front as follows:

“At the beginning of August I wrote an article about my experiences working as an emergency physician in Stockholm, Sweden during the COVID pandemic. For those who are unaware, Sweden never went into full lockdown. Instead, the country imposed a partial lockdown that was almost entirely voluntary. People with office jobs were recommended to work from home, and people in general were recommended to avoid public transport unless necessary. Those who were over seventy years old, or who had serious underlying conditions, were recommended to limit social contacts.

The only forcible restriction imposed by the government from the start was a requirement that people not gather in groups of more than fifty at a time. After it became clear that COVID was above all dangerous to people in nursing homes, an additional restriction was placed on nursing home visits.

At no time has there been any requirement on people to wear face masks in public. Restaurants, cafés, hairdressers, and shops have stayed open throughout the pandemic. Pre-schools and schools for children up to the age of sixteen have stayed open, while schools for children ages sixteen to nineteen switched to distance learning.

My personal experience is that people followed the voluntary restrictions pretty well at the beginning, but that they have become increasingly lax as time has gone on. As a personal example, my mother and my parents-in-law stayed locked up in their homes for the first six weeks or so of the pandemic. After that they couldn’t bear to be away from their grandchildren any longer.

In my earlier article in August, I mentioned that after an initial peak that lasted for a month or so, from March to April, visits to the Emergency Room due to COVID had been declining continuously, and deaths in Sweden had dropped from over one hundred a day at the peak in April, to around five per day in August.

At the point in August when I wrote that article, I hadn’t seen a single COVID patient in over a month. I speculated that Sweden had developed herd immunity, since the huge and continuous drop was happening in spite of the fact that Sweden wasn’t really taking any serious measures to prevent spread of the infection.

So, how have things developed in the six weeks since that first article?

Well, as things stand now, I haven’t seen a single COVID patient in the Emergency Room in over two and a half months. People have continued to become ever more relaxed in their behaviour, which is noticeable in increasing volumes in the Emergency Room. At the peak of the pandemic in April, I was seeing about half as many patients per shift as usual, probably because lots of people were afraid to go the ER for fear of catching COVID. Now volumes are back to normal.

When I sit in the tube on the way to and from work, it is packed with people. Maybe one in a hundred people is choosing to wear a face mask in public. In Stockholm, life is largely back to normal. If you look at the front pages of the tabloids, on many days there isn’t a single mention of COVID anywhere. As I write this (19th September 2020) the front pages of the two main tabloids have big spreads about arthritis and pensions. Apparently, arthritis and pensions are currently more exciting than COVID-19 in Sweden.

In spite of this relaxed attitude, the death rate has continued to drop. When I wrote the first article, I wrote that COVID had killed under 6,000 people. How many people have died now, six weeks later? Actually, we’re still at under 6,000 deaths. On average, one to two people per day are dying of COVID in Sweden at present, and that number continues to drop.

In the hospital where I work, there isn’t a single person currently being treated for COVID. In fact, in the whole of Stockholm, a county with very nearly two and half million inhabitants, there are currently only twenty-eight people being treated for COVID in all the hospitals combined. At the peak, in April, that number was over a thousand. If twenty-eight people are currently in hospital, out of two and a half million who live in Stockholm. Which means the odds of having a case of COVID so severe that it requires in-hospital treatment are, at the moment, about one in eighty-six thousand.

Since March, the Emergency Room where I work has been divided in to a “COVID” section and a “non-COVID” section. Anyone with a fever, cough, or sore throat has ended up in the COVID section, and we’ve been required to wear full personal protective equipment when interacting with patients in that section. Last Wednesday the hospital shut down the COVID section. So, few true cases of COVID are coming through the Emergency Room that it no longer makes sense to have a separate section for COVID.

What about the few formal restrictions that were imposed early in the pandemic?

The restriction on visits to nursing homes is going to be lifted from October 1st. The older children, ages sixteen to nineteen, who were engaging in distance learning during part of the spring, are now back in school, seeing each other and their teachers face to face. The Swedish public health authority has recommended that the government lift the restriction on gatherings from fifty people to five hundred people.

When I wrote my first article, I engaged in speculation that the reason Sweden seemed to be developing herd immunity, in spite of the fact that only a minority had antibodies, was due to T-cells. Since I wrote that article, studies have appeared which support that argument.

This is good, because T-cells tend to last longer than antibodies. In fact, studies of people who were infected with SARS-CoV-1 back in 2003 have found that they still have T-cells seventeen years after being infected. This suggests that immunity is long lasting, and probably explains why there have only been a handful of reported cases of re-infection with COVID, even though the virus has spent the last nine months bouncing around the planet infecting many millions of people.

As to the handful of people who have been reported to have been re-infected. Almost all those cases have been completely asymptomatic. That is not a sign of waning immunity, as some claim. In fact, it is the opposite. It shows that people develop a functioning immunity after the first infection, which allows them to fight off the second infection without ever developing any symptoms.

So, if Sweden already has herd immunity, what about other countries? How close are they to herd immunity? The places that have experienced a lot of COVID infections, like England and Italy, have mortality curves that are very similar to Sweden’s, in spite of the fact that they went into lockdown. My interpretation is that they went into lockdown too late for it to have any noticeable impact on the spread of the disease. If that is the case, then they have likely also developed herd immunity by now. Which would make the ongoing lockdowns in those countries bizarre.

What about the vaccine? Will it arrive in time to make a difference? As I mentioned in my first article, lockdown only makes sense if you are willing to stay in lockdown until there is an effective vaccine. Otherwise you are merely postponing the inevitable. At the earliest, a vaccine will be widely available at some point in the middle of next year.

How many governments are willing to keep their populations in lockdown until then? And what if the vaccine is only thirty per-cent effective? Or fifty per-cent? Will governments decide that is good enough for them to end lockdown? Or will they want to stay in lockdown until there is a vaccine that is at least ninety per-cent effective? How many years will that take?

So, to conclude: COVID is over in Sweden. We have herd immunity. Most likely, many other parts of the world do too, including England, Italy, and parts of the US, like New York. And the countries that have successfully contained the spread of the disease, like Germany, Denmark, New Zealand, and Australia, are going to have to stay in lockdown for at least another year, and possibly several years, if they don’t want to develop herd immunity the natural way.

331 thoughts on “More COVID19 news from Sweden

    1. Dan Anderson

      This was a puzzling posting, almost saying Sweden did it right
      as it declares “COVID is over in Sweden” by one ER doc’s observation,
      with a few hundred cases a day in the nation the size of North Carolina.

      NC, my home, which is in a quasi-lockdown of bars, concerts with gyms,
      churches, bowling alleys open and some restaurants acting as bars, is
      having over a thousand new cases a day, three times+ that of Sweden.
      So, IF 300 new cases a day means covid is over, NC has a way to go.

      On deaths, which the posting stresses, the post ignores the high number of
      cases to date in Sweden compared to others. Comparing Sweden to its neighbors Norway and Finland, both of whom did lock downs,
      Sweden has had 5900 deaths —
      Finland a few hundred deaths,
      Norway a couple of hundred deaths.
      Sweden has had 19x as many deaths as its neighbors,
      Maybe those numbers should feature in the posting,
      especially when “still at under 6,000 deaths” is used as a good measure marker.Good if the pandemic is over in Sweden, but Finland & Norway have a long way to go before reaching that level of death. 

      OTOH, compared to my state of NC, in the USA, – Sweden, with about the same size population has had 88,000 cases reported, while NC has far more, 194,000 cases reported. Why so many more cases in NC?  Twice+ as many.

      Sweden, with half the cases, has twice the number of deaths as NC. Why more Swedish deaths?
      IF deaths matter, as implied in the article, what does that say?
      What is the lesson to be learned?

      Despite the lack of lock down, Sweden’s economy has suffered nearly
      the same as Finland & Norway. There’s another question, is it deaths, illnesses or the economic loss that count? What would be the proper formula? What will we do different the next time?
      The current cost of NOT locking down in Sweden compared to adjoining nations:
      —-is eight or nine times the cases,
      —  -16x the deaths as Finland & Norway
      — and about the same economic impact.
      I have questions, not answers here in NC, USA. What will we do next time?At this point in time, I don’t see Sweden as the example to follow and don’t understand why it is held up as a model at this point. The US FDA has not approved any treatment for Covid. No vaccine is approved. Without those, NC. Finland, Norway will have as many deaths as Sweden in time, maybe in six months for my state.  Keep the discussion going, please.

      Reply
      1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

        The hope, my hope, is that Sweden allowed the virus to circulate through the population, and they have reached population wide immunity.

        They did make the mistake of clearing Covid19 positive patients out of hospitals and into care homes, and other mad actions, which explains a high proportion of deaths – as in the UK any NY. Which goes some way to explaining the high death rate, initially.

        “We did not manage to protect the most vulnerable people, the most elderly, despite our best intentions,” Prime Minister Stefan Löfven admitted last week. The Swedish Public Health Agency told the BBC that 48.9% of deaths were care home residents up to and including 14 May.

        Sweden did ban visits to care homes on 31 March. But as in many European countries, relatives, staff and union officials have shared concerns that protective clothing arrived too late, and that some staff may have gone to work at the start of the crisis despite showing symptoms of Covid-19.

        Now, increasing numbers of workers are also coming forward to criticise regional healthcare authorities for protocols which they say discourage care home workers from sending residents into hospital, and prevent care home and nursing staff from administering oxygen without a doctor’s approval, either as part of acute or palliative (end-of-life) services. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-52704836

        With regard to ‘cases’ you may find this article interesting. https://lockdownsceptics.org/lies-damned-lies-and-health-statistics-the-deadly-danger-of-false-positives/

        A positive test does not mean a case of Covid19

        Reply
        1. Lisa

          FYI I was just reading about a recent wedding in Maine, USA with 62 guests that resulted in 170 new cases and 8 covid deaths. None of the 8 people who died had been to the wedding. Tracers found that after wedding guests traveled (in some cases long distances) home, they infected spouses, children, and so on, who went on to infect others – bringing the virus into a care home and a jail (via employees, I think), among other places.

          Is it really feasible to protect the vulnerable (not just the elderly but those with other relevant health problems) while a portion of the population is behaving normally? I wish we could try a middle path between lockdowns (which save lives when the curve is climbing and hospitals are overwhelmed but are unnecessary once cases decline and stay flat) and “normal life.” In other words, the path of masks & distancing, limited gatherings, improved indoor ventilation, etc.

          I also wish the US would collect and publicize more data. For ex – very basic – how many of the millions in the US who have tested positive went on to get sick – does anyone know? And what portion of the sick end up with long term symptoms – and in what age groups? How many people in different age groups are hospitalized (US doctors have been saying for a while they are seeing younger patients now), etc. etc. etc.

          Reply
      2. Martin Back

        I think the point about Sweden isn’t that it did particularly well, because it didn’t, but that it wasn’t the catastrophe that epidemiologist foretold would happen in the absence of a lockdown.

        Reply
        1. Peter Defty

          It points to the reality of dealing with it in a forward looking way. Sure there were mis-steps, particularly with the elderly and immigrant. This has been acknowledged and dealt with. Moving forward and knowing this while looking at the total COVID deaths under 60 in Sweden we can see a different picture emerge.

          I was infected in July by a confirmed case. I am 60 so technically high risk. The person I was in contact with is 76 and was clearly COVID and diagnosed. He was in Arizona in early July when there was a COVID outbreak…it took him 2-3 weeks to recover without a Hospital stay. I was asymptomatic. I did feel like my body was fighting something off but I did not curtail my work nor running and ran 3 out of the 4 days I figure my body was ‘figuring it out’ because on the 5th day (6 days after contact/exposure) I noticed I had more energy and my run was markedly faster and stronger. I take my metabolic health seriously. I am fat adapted. My cholesterol is high as would be expected in a fat adapted endurance athlete. I am on zero meds. . . . there is no money to be made off me nor am I dependent upon ‘The System’ though being rogue and outside the system extracts a big cost personally….keep up the great work Malcom and Sebastian!

          Reply
          1. Gery

            Brilliant to hear from another like-minded human so connected and in touch with his body! Thank you for sharing that.

        2. Dan Anderson

          I’ll say again, the current cost of NOT locking down in Sweden compared to adjoining nations:
          — 16x the deaths as Finland & Norway.
          Even if the 48% deaths MK noted as errors in procedures is taken away in Sweden, knocking the 5900 deaths to 3000, it’s still a losing comparison to the 500 deaths combined in Norway & Finland.

          As for predictions, in the USA, which tried to lock down,
          I think the 200,000 deaths are ABOVE what the CDC predicted
          if there was no lockdown. (Correct me if I remember wrong.)
          Certainly, Finland and Norway were wise considering deaths.

          What we learn from this pandemic for the next, which will come,
          is to protect the vulnerable and let nature take its course,
          not to say physical distance, hygiene, & masks might be used.
          How long does it take to ID the vulnerable & who is safe?
          In 2009 pandemic, it was the young most vulnerable, not the old.
          That was true in the 1918 pandemic, too, wasn’t it?

          Reply
          1. AhNotepad

            I feel sorry for you that you appear to be living in fear of the next pandemic, I just have to look backwards at all the pandemics my ancestors managed to survive. It’s not a problem for most people, and if it gets me, well that’s a risk of having a life. Having no life living in fear means you get nothing at all. And please stop playing with numbers and misrepresenting them. You quote 16x but where is there mention of confounding factors? Talk about something else.

          2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            What exactly are you talking about Dan?
            The media pandemic by which corporately ‘partnered’ governments so over-reacted as to be inconceivably destructive to our way of life… ah – there’s the rub – or rather the intent to rub out a way of life.
            Normal has been ‘cancelled’.
            The new conditioning is in progress – ‘nudge nudge – know what I mean!’
            You clearly believe what you think you need to believe – but I ask you’
            What could possibly go right?

            Hyped up ‘pandemics’ are a tool or means of milking, leveraging and reprogramming the fearful, as a cover story over toxic policy and practice, running wilfully blind and self-serving agenda.

            Deaths by all causes occur as part of a life in form. Cells that refuse to release back into the whole within their natural or functional part of the whole are called cancerous – as if no longer part OF and one with the host that is now fed upon.

            You don’t want to see that almost all of the death you bandy stats on are part of the natural cycle – even if they occurred under unnatural social and political circumstances.
            I don’t WANT your idea of ‘protection’ and do not accept and believe your idea of threat and harm. To let Nature take her course is to be in our own nature as aligned purpose. As with the idea of mid-wiving or nursing the health of ourselves and each other.

            But pathological thinking has no room in it for a true Health or wholeness of being alive, here and now, and so translates it as ‘risk of disease and death’. As I understand from Malcolm the latter is 100%. But here now – in the moment at hand and alive I witness 0% risk of death.
            Fear of pain and loss can rob us of the live we have and of it natural and rightful unfoldment AS a humanly lived and shared existence.

            Predictive planning has rightful place within the whole, but to lose your Soul for a computer model is set in false premises, following false profits to a false outcome. No amount of force or cunning suggestions will change the premises from which your ‘model’ operates. It is not your humanity – but while you have human consciousness you have choice. Fear may TELL you what to think, but you are the one that chooses to listen.

          3. anna m

            Dan,
            We know one reason for Norway’s lower numbers is that their nursing homes are much smaller, but why compare Sweden to only those two countries which for some reason had exceptionally low deaths? Sweden’s deaths are on par with other countries and they DIDN’T LOCK DOWN.

          4. JustSaying

            It’s unscientific to blame Sweden’s mortality rate on government policy, while not blaming Spain’s government policy, a very harsh lockdown, for the high mortality rate there. Or consider Peru, which had possibly the earliest, harshest, most mask-wearing lockdown of them all and has ended up with the highest per capita mortality by quite a lead, while Nicaragua with no lockdown at all has had minimal deaths.

            The biggest single confounding factor may well be mortality displacement, as discussed extensively by user Humble_Analysis on Twitter https://threadreaderapp.com/user/Humble_Analysis. If you look at the viewer here: https://mpidr.shinyapps.io/stmortality/ which shows excess mortality figures from mortality.org by country, and set Measure in the left-hand sidebar to “Death Rate, Total” to give a fair comparison, Sweden had an enormous mortality deficit throughout 2019 and through most of 2020 too apart from the brief spike in excess mortality due to COVID, which doesn’t begin to match the mortality deficit in area! So it may be that most of the people who died of COVID were people who would have in more normal conditions have died in 2019. If you look at Finland, Greece and other countries that the lockdown advocates like to contrast with Sweden you will see that they had above-average mortality in 2019 and/or early 2020, so there was no mortality displacement effect. If you look at the other end of the scale, at countries like Slovakia, Hungary and Israel which had very few COVID cases, they all had high excess mortality before COVID, so the people who would have died of COVID in those countries were already dead.

          5. Gery

            This may provide some level of clarity for some of you……….

            Reiner Fuellmich is working with medical doctors Heiko Schoning & Bodo Schiffman as well as huge numbers of international highly regarded expert others.
            Malcolm, I hope you are now fully recovered and back in tip top health. If you haven’t already seen Reiner’s vid from yesterday (above), I highly recommend.

      3. к514

        Sweden actually classified statistics on the coronavirus. For 4 months, no data is published on those who have recovered. And information on the sick and dead is clearly distorted.

        Reply
    2. Sula maye

      I don’t understand how the link is made between Sweden potentially having herd immunity to us in the UK potentially having herd immunity, when the cases of covid in the UK are going up, as is evident when i use the Zoe app and in three weeks have seen my county go from 17 cases to over 300? It genuinely doesn’t appear as if we are out of the woods sadly. As someone with M.E who has seen that covid isn’t just die or survive, there are a lot of people still getting ‘strange’ post viral symptoms, i would love us to have herd immunity as i have spent the last 9 years crawling through life and slowly, slowly improving and don’t want that wiped out, but i don’t see any evidence for this immunity.

      What your swedish coleague does not take into account, and neither do you, the different lifestyle and baseline health of the Swedes compared to the BRitish, for one they eat lots of fish, vitamin D is potentially important, we have chronic low levels here. Surely that could impact things?

      Reply
      1. anna m

        Sula,

        When people speak of cases it means little to me as I don’t know what they refer to. It is perfectly normal and part of life for us to encounter microbes and fight them off. So if they are now swabbing people by the thousands, and they call some of them cases, it means absolutely nothing unless these people are sick. Were the 17 people you mention sick? Are the 300 people currently sick?
        If not, we are being had.

        Reply
        1. Grumpy Gumnut

          This has been my argument for much of this “pandemic”. Literally thousands are testing “positive” (using questionable test protocols) but these people are walking in and out of the testing sites. They are not in hospital beds or ICUs or HDUs. We are focussing care and concern on the wrong demographic. Look after the elderly and let the country get back to life and work. I think we’re still being “locked down” because politicians don’t know how to back out without letting us realise it was (mostly) overkill (pun not really intended).

          Reply
          1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            … is not a disease.
            Biomarker infringements attract penalty status to support and protect the covid heath service – or biosecurity state.
            Tom Cowan’s latest puts forth another way of looking at all of this this as well as notifying of a virological publication referring to experiments involving Sars-Cov-1, 2 and 3 in 2007.
            The ability to define disease characteristics, diagnosis and testing – and therefore treatment, is a godlike power.
            Why give priority or credibility and currency to such assertions?
            Why not question them and ask for factual demonstration?

            Without fact, the deceit is laid bare.

  1. Stuart Cairns

    Lordy, lordy. Such an interesting read. How can we get the people in charge of our country (Scotland & the UK) to start believing this stuff. It’s so obvious, why are they ignoring it? Thanks for bringing it to us, Dr K. Actually it was obvious in March but they were too busy imitating headless chickens to stop and think.

    Reply
    1. Benedict Jephcote

      It will be a bit more time I think. Many people are cautious and risk averse where it comes to loss, and loss of life is about as high on the agenda as one can get. [I know, lockdown also leads to death but short-termism and the fact that secondary deaths from lockdown are very hard to notice makes it hard for people to see the harms of lockdown so easily.]

      I feel that, if we get to (let’s say) the start of November and Sweden looks ‘miraculously’ free of covid still, a few more heads will start to notice and go ‘hmm, interesting’.

      If death rates in the likes of UK, France and Spain stay low (maybe despite rising case numbers), then again, maybe more leaders and health people will go ‘hmm, interesting’.

      However, if we are scientists, we are open to doubt. There is good evidence that some countries, particularly Sweden, won’t see this second wave, but we do we totally know? Will one or two Swedish care homes have a small outbreak that makes some headlines again? Is it a small chance?

      I hope, for the sake of humanity, that we have the seen very close to end of the virus in Sweden, and I hope that many parts of France, Spain and the UK are also edging towards the threshold point that Sweden perhaps has reached.

      By November, the world will start having more evidence. This could prove to be useful for more minds to open and opinions to change.

      Reply
      1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

        What we give priority to, we give power to.
        The capacity to be hijacked by fear is the capacity to behave from an entirely false basis – and to persist such a basis as a leveraging of self-survival in the terms of the deceit.

        As readers here must know covid was ‘normal’ within the death by all causes statistics for the seasonal fluctuations (according to latitude). So the PERCEIVED and believed risks are what is operating as a basis for actual and active harms that are directly and indirectly resulting from the REACTION – or should I say the controlled reaction – in the manner of a ‘shaped explosive charge’.

        There never was evidence for shutting down the economy and locking up the healthy in draconian and inhuman regulations.
        Yet the willingness to enact such measures is likely the single most important ‘fact’ that persuades those who have not leaned to question their own thinking (or others’ insinuation and suggestion) from the heart of an honesty of being.

        Mad people can obsessively focus on inconsequentials as a boundary condition against letting in what cannot be tolerated or faced.

        But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.
        “Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”
        “How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.
        “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.
        ~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

        Reply
        1. Benedict Jephcote

          In case it’s not clear, I am pretty hopeful that Sweden may be close to achieving an effective herd immunity.
          There’s a slight uptick going on in cases and deaths in Sweden, and time will tell if it’s minor or if it is a touch more problematic.
          I feel Sweden is in a better position than most countries at the current time.
          Cases seem very low in London (particularly the inner London boroughs).
          New York by the data so far seems to be in very good stead right now. They’re getting approx. 800 cases per day and 8 deaths per day and it’s been at about that rate since mid-Jun.
          I feel south east Asian countries are likely to do ok because they may well have decent T cell immunity thanks to SARS-1 in previous years.
          I’m far from mad. I’m simply trying to mediate a bit. Letting people know how the other side sees things and looking to find ways to have discussion going so that those in favour of lockdowns can better see eye to eye with those who strongly question/refute that -and vice versa.

          Reply
          1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            Nothing in my response was addressed to your person – but to the themes you raised.
            I appreciate your willingness to mediate the fearful to a more reasoned place. I do the same from a different place.
            Everything you say is within a framework of belief I do not share in, or accept only with great reservations and qualifying contexts – a bit like the BBC and media narratives that set up and executed the covid reaction – which in my view is the symptom that points to the real problem, and not the emotionally baited and invested ‘problem’ to which most everyone is ‘madly’ framed in.
            Mad can simply mean not in our right mind, as a result of persisting a wrong or false set of assumptions.
            Everything about the 2020 switching off of life support for at least millions down the line (along with denying basic human freedoms), speaks to me a a ‘mad world’. But it isn’t the trees etc – its us – our sense of self and world.

            I realise that you are not looking in a similar way to me, and I offer this reply in civility to a sense of your own. NOT as any attempt to persuade or convince you of what you are not currently interested in, moved by or resonant in.

            Fear – in the sense that is allowed to take over our emotional reaction – always distorts or shuts down our mind – or repurposes it ONLY to the fear driven ‘need’. So to truly calm the mind serves a rising of greater awareness. But the false sense of calm that comes from denying the mind by seeking for and protecting a need NOT to know – is the abnegation of our mind to some external or externalised dictate or set of rules. In my observation this goes very deep into who we are and how we see and relate to our world.

            In your terms most of the ‘herd’ were already effectively immune and the WHO that told us we were naked – or defenceless, primed great fear by the telling – and our willingness to believe it.

            Higher vit D and other nutrient levels would in my view have made our immunity even more capable of incorporating and surviving the change (new environmental challenges).

            There’s no profit for parasites in a living way of seeing our self and our world.
            Parasites are functional in clearing away and recycling the dead!

            My sense is that rational thinking has little role in releasing the minds of those locked into a terror threat. Love has this capacity – and where there is willingness, the reflection of the ability to recognise choices that don’t really serve us so as to freely shift to better choices.

            But where there is a relational willingness for learning, sharing is the integrative expression of a symbiotic alignment. As distinct from a rule base ‘sharing’ of risk according to a program announced and enforced from ‘on high’.

  2. Sue Richardson

    Thank you. This is Very Good News. Someone should tell Boris and his crew. But will they? And will he give two hoots?

    Reply
    1. Tim

      Boris and Dominic have their own agenda. It’s called; ‘Scare the British population so they don’t see that Dominic is taking Britain out of the world without a trade deal’. The virus has been their gift horse.

      Reply
  3. Jennifer

    Thankyou for giving Dr Rushforth the exposure to tell us of his experience.
    I am of the opinion that we in the UK are being directed down a dark, never ending, alley.
    The 11am statements today have done nothing to put me at ease to believe that we are in safe, knowledgeable hands. Terrifying the s..t out of me with small scale graphs on telly are meaningless. How does repeating the same regime suggest it will work 2nd time around, when it didn’t do much 1st time round?
    Good hygiene and nutritious food would be a start to suppressing the virus….so give the people advice ( and the means) to enforce those two for a start.

    Reply
      1. Jennifer

        AhNotepad. I know you are correct, and mean well in order to help save my sanity, so thankyou..However, I feel I need to keep up to date. The problem is….being able to work out truth from fiction. I love this blog as it opens my mind.

        Reply
        1. Sue Madden

          Jennifer, you have to ask yourself “up to date with what?”. I haven`t watched UK telly news for years tho it`s hard to get to the radio fast enough to stop the awful news bulletins on radio 3 and 4 for example. I have honed my sources and now use principally Naked Capitalism which has been very good flagging up SARS-CoV-2 studies as well as all the rest of the useful work on wider topics it does. I use sources like Dr John Campbell and Medcram for useful medical, epidemiological information and links to studies. Malcolm`s blog of course!! From these I find other sources, that I then treat critically.
          However, that doesn`t mean I believe they all get eveything right all the time, or that I agree with their conclusions from what evidence they cite. The key is keeping a critical eye open always and thinking for yourself.
          This is the method I use to keep sane, feel at least that I have some control…..
          One thing, the behaviour of a virus in a pandemic and, more especially, the behaviour of its host are complex things and only time shows more clearly and certainly what might really underlie what we think we see. It`s really important not to fall into fixed ideas and be ready to change when faced with a more convincing (temporary) explanation of causal factors behind events. I`m concluding now that this virus isn`t especially strange, it is more its human host that is strange – in our collective response to it, but also our physiological response. Those who do badly are having a derailed immune response, the virus often long gone or virtually so. At least part of this is down to widespread inadequate vit D levels (I think now, from the accumulating evidence, that it is a very large factor and that correcting everyone`s plasma D levels would truly reduce this virus to a nasty bout of flu in most of the worst cases, and nothing much for all the rest). If you look at the course of bad COVID outcomes they are all things directly linked to the multiple roles of vit D in the whole course of the immune response. Dr K and Dr Seheult (Medcram) and many others have helped educate us in this and I can never be grateful enough for their work on all our behalfs.
          Who makes up the news? Who chooses what is important? The planet has over 7 billion people and we are asked to obssess over a few topics chosen by WHO and for what reason? Keep asking these questions, I think it might help – hope it does….

          Reply
          1. Jennifer

            Sue, many thanks. I will certainly access some of the sources you mention, in the spirit of the great subscribers who share useful info with us. I am so grateful for stuff I learn here.
            Who decides which news topics we have inflicted on us by all media, in particular the press?This question was the subject of a dissertation done by my husband many, many years ago, whilst studying politics. I can tell you that neither of us have managed to work it out since, and get accused of being conspiracy theorists.
            One thing for sure….from the politics point of view ( hubby’s interest), and my health (NHS background) interest, we have wonderful conversations in our retirement! Still not got the answers though.

        2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          It will keep you out of date with your capacity to discern truth.
          Cognitive dissonance is reacting to what is not true as if it was – such as to perceive all that is not true in its place. This will keep you in lockstep.

          But don’t let truth get in the way of a good story – eh!

          I trust you to discern how to be – even if part of that process is falling over.

          Beliefs are what I used to think were reality, while what I thought I believed was a mask over a child of Life. That is to say ‘Sanity of wholeness’ is covered over and never ultimately lost – though in this world we tend to give death ultimate power OVER life – or the truth would get in the way of the story – and have to be crossed out to keep turning the truth into something to possess and control (rather than share in).

          Reply
    1. Patrick healy

      Jennifer,
      Good points. I always thought the definition of insanity is repeating the same trick (thing, experiment) over and over again and expecting a different result.
      Where does that place our ‘beloved’ leaders – north and south of Hadrians Wall?
      As usual it is great to read yet another interesting piece from our good Doctor – a voice crying in the wilderness.

      Reply
      1. Jennifer

        Patrick Healy. I was born and educated yards south of Hadrian’s wall, so I consider these blogs with my inbuilt Geordie logic. As I stated a week or so ago, the blog is being stifled by the incessant stats spouted by those ( trolls) intent on diverting attention from how best we are to manage the pandemic. Geordies are known for plain speaking, and intellectual honesty, so I am getting annoyed with these useless, argumentative spats, which add nothing to the topic.
        Where’s Goran when we need his decent opinions on life in present day Sweden? After all, his thoughtful views from the front line would be of real interest.

        Reply
        1. Gery

          The only pandemic we are experiencing is one of fear (based largely on corrupt fabrication, and managed succinctly with insidious psychological brainwashing techniques).

          Reply
          1. Jennifer

            Gery, logic tells me you are so correct. But heart tells me I must minimise the worry and fear that is successfully infiltrating our 3 generations of offspring. The powers that be are doing a grand job at that. ….about the only thing they are managing to do!…shame on them.

          2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            Whose worry and fear are you seeking to minimise? Why not dispel?
            Are you suggesting the corp-media-gov are successful in minimising any change of being taken seriously in respect to ‘the science’?
            Or that they were successful in hijacking our minds by hiding their payload in a trojan horse?
            My heart didn’t open to receive the trojan in the first place, logic serves whatever it is predicated upon. Perhaps it was time for everyone to receive a crash course in re-education on the nature of deceit?
            We have one now.

            I don’t belittle the pains of the divisions this brings up in family and friend, and society in pieces, but if someone doesn’t hold for the heart of reason, we all become headless chickens. Not believing another’s narrative of choices’ doesn’t mean not loving them and accepting their freedom to make choices, and in time, better choices. If I push on anyone to save them in my world, I get pushed back into my world and perhaps a closed door in my face. But that is better feedback than being humoured or complied with ‘for the sake of peace’.

            Like wise the ‘authorities’ can recognise that those who clearly and unequivocally say ‘No!’ are offering real feedback to a better choice, rather than dancing puppets or ‘yes-men’ who confirm the madness to the deluded just to serve their own agenda and not because they actually trust and appreciate such ‘paramount concerns’.

            A lot of this is pre-rational. The rational can only come in when there is a release of the grip of the fear. in my opinion 😉

          3. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            Susceptibility to the nudging, framing, suggestions, insinuations and other dirty tricks is not something that we are helpless to.
            Reacting emotionally very often plays into a diversion into division, and actually at expense of a true feeling awareness or presence.
            But stories are the way our mind is predicated to identify.
            Investment in our story is the key to being profiled and targeted.
            But we are more than a narrative seeking continuity to save face.

  4. Håkan

    Some countries contained the virus without a hard lockdown, e.g. South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Germany and Iceland managing without high number of deaths in the first round and still a second wave of deaths are not seen. How should those countries be understood in this context?

    Reply
    1. Marjorie Daw

      Given that Covid 19 does not satisfy Koch’s postulates, how can it be understood in any context? Andrew Kaufman MD tears apart another junk science study published in “Nature.” Let’s just say it’s over and leave it at that.
      https://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/zero-evidence-covid-fulfills-kochs-4-germ-theory-postulates-dr-andrew-kaufman-say?utm_campaign=Daily%20Newsletter%3A%20Dr.%20Kaufman%20Interview%20%28UYNaqm%29&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Daily%20Newsletter&_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJtZXJyeWZpZWxkZmFybTIyN0BnbWFpbC5jb20iLCAia2xfY29tcGFueV9pZCI6ICJLMnZYQXkifQ%3D%3D

      Reply
      1. Ken Garoo

        Koch’s postulates predate knowledge about virii, and are no longer sufficient. Even some bacteria fail Koch’s Postulates. eg T pallidum which cannot be grown outside a host, usually rabbit, as it leverages the biochemical processes of the host in its replicative cycle.

        Reply
  5. Paul Mead

    An interesting article – but I’d be happier if the claim of herd immunity was backed up with antibody proof of a large scale sampling of the population, but it looks promising.

    Reply
      1. Matthias

        So who will do the T-cell immunity test? When? Why is everybody focussing on Antibodies if they are the wrong indicator anyway?

        Reply
          1. LA_Bob

            I really doubt it’s deliberate (recalling the “conspiracy theory” ). Antibodies have long been associated with “immunity” in the lay mind as well (probably) as in the professional medical mind.

            Go back to 1967 and the motion picture “Fantastic Voyage”. Some official knowing the only key to breaking a code (or something like that) was comatose with a blood clot in the brain. Scientists miniaturized a submarine and injected it into the patient to hunt down and break up the clot. The “bad guy” in the story (played by Donald Pleasance) made the sub perturb healthy brain tissue, and a raft of antibodies emerged to try and kill the crew. It’s simply an idea of long standing, a reminder we know far, far less about immunity than we fancy we do.

            Raquel Welch was young and drop-dead gorgeous in the film.

      2. Peggy Sue

        I’m not sure if it was Witty or Valance but one of them specifically mentioned other forms of immunity and rapidly dismissed them as likely to be minimal/insignificant. Blink and you’d have missed it.

        Reply
      3. Damien Sanderson

        Concerning the uselessness of antibody testing compared to COVID reactive T cells. . . I have just written as much to my MP. Probably have a deaf ears issue though.

        Reply
      1. JohnC

        A significant number of infective agents are stopped before symptoms develop, particularly viruses. There are multiple layers to our immune system that have evolved alongside the evolution of Homo sapiens. We have elements of the immune system found in insects, the basic one being a vast number of cells, each with a unique sensor that locks onto a specific protein pattern of viruses, bacteria and fungi. The antibody related system was probably a late development evolutionary speaking.

        Reply
    1. Terry Wright

      Paul Mead: a bit of revision: you need to go back to earlier blogs where things like the role of Vit D was covered; how we have an innate immune system; the adaptive (antibodies) is a later and slower thing;

      “but I’d be happier ” ……. Paul; you really need to see antibodies as a sign of failure; that layers of resistance have already failed; we need to get you to a happy place, where you understand the layers of the innate system: try this for starters https://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/1743-422X-5-29 and this https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2870528/ where both will acts as foils to the false narrative the media endlessly spins at all ……

      Reply
  6. KJE

    I wonder how Sweden’s economy is doing (given that they must be affected by declining economies in other countries. I still bet it’s better than the UK. I wish I could move to Sweden

    Reply
  7. toekneep

    Interesting article however I am a little confused. If UK has developed herd immunity as suggested why are infection figures on an exponential rise? In Sweden they appear almost flat.

    Reply
      1. Martin Back

        This is an absolute bonanza for the testing laboratories. One wonders how many are employing untrained staff, el cheapo reagents and equipment, and rushed sterilization protocols. Not to mention there are probably some out-and-out chancers out there. Does any authority verify the accuracy of their results? There are so many reports of implausibly many positive results coming from some laboratories.

        Reply
        1. Martin Back

          Obviously the more cycles you have to do, the more expensive a PCR test is to perform. One wonders how labs get paid for each test. Is it a blanket price that covers any number of cycles, in which case they would do the minimum cycles specified, or if the more cycles they do the more they get paid, in which case they would be tempted to keep cycling until they get a positive result, which would account for very low viral loads or viral fragments triggering a false positive?

          Reply
          1. JohnC

            As I understand it the number of cycles is around 40.
            This means every single strand of RNA results in a trillion pieces of DNA.
            As I understand it a fluorescent dye is added that attaches to the DNA, and the presence of a detectable glow from this dye is what determines a positive result.
            Also there’s a suggestion that one sequence of RNA being tested for is present in the human genome.

      2. fairweather

        All true no doubt, but in my corner of the UK Covid admissions to A&E are rising again, and there’s talk of a local lockdown (sigh).

        Reply
          1. fairweather

            No idea, though I do know it’s impossible to enter the NHS A&E portal and become an ICU respiratory patient without being seriously ill. It’s a little early for flu cases – in Dr MK’s sense of the word.

    1. Cheezilla

      Because they are not infection figures. They are false positives from inappropriate testing of healthy people, using a method that was never designed to be a diagnostic test.
      As the article demonstrates, we should be looking at covid hospital admissions and deaths from (not with!) covid.

      Reply
    2. Damien Sanderson

      ToeKeep . . . Are you looking at the graph the medical officer showed today (Monday) Look carefully at the at the graph . . . the rise in the number of measured infections is hardly exponential – it is near linear. The medical officer said something like “if there was a doubling of cases every week we are looking at exponential rise.” . This was shown as an orange bars . . He then quickly covered himself by adding added that this was NOT a prediction. The only reason there is an increase in the number of detected infections is as an artifact of the number of tests being carried out. If you doubled the number of tests every week . . . for a while you might get an exponential rise in infection detected.
      Rather than detected infections a better metric is the weekly number of deaths or the number of hospital cases, These have been bumping along the bottom of the graph since mid August. COVID-19 outbreak is breathing its last for this year.

      Reply
      1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

        What he also said, I paid attention to. He said that if we have 50,000 cases, we will have more than 200 deaths. Now, he did not say more than 300 deaths. So, we can assume 200 is the lower boundary and 300, the upper. If 50,000 cases results in 200 deaths, then the Case Fatality Rate (CFR) is 0.4%. If it is 300, the CFR is 0.6%. As we all know Imperial College in their initial model put the Infection Fatality Rate at 0.9%. The infection fatality rate is always significantly lower than the case fatality rate. So, it seems the IFR figures continue to fall, and fall. As predicted.

        Reply
    3. AhNotepad

      Toekneep, with rubbish testing you get rubbish results, which is what we are seeing. It is a fiction and as far from the truth as Matthew Halfcock can move it.

      Reply
        1. AhNotepad

          I was commenting on the UK. I don’t have enough information about other countries, though to find something similar would be no surprise.

          Reply
      1. AhNotepad

        We hear “exponential rise” a lot from politicians. If I was within speaking distance I would say, “sorry, I hear the phrase exponential rise often, but I’m not sure exactly what that means. Could you clarify please?”. There might be a stumbling over words.

        Reply
  8. Rosie Sol

    Thank you Malcolm and thank you Sebastian for taking the time to share your truth with us. It is very much appreciated.
    I am becoming really, really, really sick (no pun intended) of this entire situation. It has been clear for months now that this government (and its so called ‘expert’ advisors) is not fit for purpose. It is either INCREDIBLY MORONICALLY STUPID or INCREDIBLY GROTESQUELY CORRUPT (personally, from my own research, I run with the latter). This government needs to be removed immediately. It is NOT acting in the best interests of the people of this country in any way, shape or form. Indeed, it is displaying frighteningly psychopathic behaviour.
    In addition the psychological fear-mongering propaganda techniques adopted by government these past few months are both DESPICABLE and REPREHENSIBLE to say the least. Those techniques in themselves will have and are still causing needless suffering and deaths. It is beyond disgusting behaviour and wholly unacceptable at any level.
    Furthermore, mainstream media is run by PATHETIC WIMPS who take orders from puppet masters. – not a real man / woman amongst them with the guts or integrity to print the TRUTH!
    I challenge you here and now MSM people……..to stand up and start reporting TRUTH. YOUR own freedom and health (and that of YOUR own children) is on the line, just as much as that of the general public… who also happen to be your fellow human beings. Do you remember that once precious (now dead) ideal of ‘FREEDOM OF THE PRESS’….. do ANY of you have the guts to resurrect it ???

    Reply
    1. Cheezilla

      ” It is either INCREDIBLY MORONICALLY STUPID or INCREDIBLY GROTESQUELY CORRUPT (personally, from my own research, I run with the latter). ”

      I run with the latter too.
      We are essentally living in a totalitarian state, governed by SIs gleefully tweeted out at the last minute by an evident sociopath.
      The backbenchers had better wake up soon and start doing their well-paid job to represent the electorate!

      Reply
    2. Jennifer

      Rosie, very well said. Today we learned of the death of Harold Evans. We have listened to journalists reading out well deserved complementary obituaries, so it would be great it they felt strong enough to follow the determination he demonstrated in order to reach truth. It is a big ask on my part, but there is a need for better standards of independent reporting. I retain the freedom to wish….I think.

      Reply
  9. Dr. Pavan Pharter

    Like in all competitions and tragic operas – it ain’t over until the fat lady sings. (or in this case dies of covid). Pandemics take years to sort out. In the drive through fast food Netflix age we all have developed the patience of gnats. We don’t fully understand the long term ramifications of covid and unseen damage at this time. But reports show that what it takes diabetes decades to do in atherosclerotic damage, covid can do in a week. When will Dr, Kendrick start addressing this and the fate of long haulers? This used to be a pro heart health blog. Would like to see that again.

    Reply
      1. David Bailey

        It has always seemed likely that these claims are the result of ongoing testing of an aged group who therefore have a lot more problems generally. Do you know if these studies even adjusted for this, or are they simply anecdotal reports?

        BTW, I believe Belarus also bucked the trend and did not lockdown.

        Reply
      2. Paul Solomon

        Interesting, but isn’t it true that influenza doesn’t have the long-term heart, lung, intestine, circulatory and neurological effects that Covid seems to produce?

        Reply
      3. Dan Anderson

        IF Covid is in effect, equal to the flu, then what we have in effect, is a doubling of the flu. That is significant. In comparing flu to Covid, the one being equal to the other does not cancel one out, but means we now have twice the problem flu was.

        Reply
          1. Dan Anderson

            What would prevent flu from having the usual number of cases on top of the number of Covid? Co-infection do happen, and so far it looks as if having both flu and covid doubles the risk of death. HIV patients have coinfections, as does flu with bacterial infection. I’ll defer to the good doctor to address the particulars, but common sense tells us that a new disease does not negate an old one. Covid may join the cold and flu season as yet another straw on our backs.

        1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          Dan – this doesn’t come up much in the fervid covid ferment, but the statistics for ‘flu deaths’ are not virologically backed up – nor are they structly ‘flu’ but complication rising from or associated with respiratory disease – and perhaps fevers – assigned to ‘flu’.

          The statistics of end of life scenarios can provide a basis for setting a great fear as a basis to ‘nudge people’ to vaccinate against flu when anyone of a rational disposition that checks the historical efficacy – and risks of such a procedure – would likely see much better options for health including none.

          It is established that flu vaccinations increase other respiratory infection – including the coronavirus.

          It suggests to me there is a NEED for the respiratory episode and that the attempt to block the body in its immune function undermines that function.
          It may be that lack of vit D and other nutrients, prohibits ongoing detoxification or regeneration – such as to build up and under whatever triggers – ‘catch the cold’.

          There are concerns of cross reaction between contaminations in the flu vaccine and natural immune response to what would in most, be a non critical, mild or hardly noticed ‘sickness’.
          James Corbett recently gave this some attention – as did some educated commenters.

          But despite all the above – if the figures of death by covid or ‘with covid’ were none of them flue – then is the last flu season one of the weakest on record?

          People live in their imaginations without a grounding in fact and experience – not least because it is easy to hold opinions, invest in stories and sell them to people via the Media, advertising and political broadcasting. They can also die as a result of giving priority to such imaginations – and that is what is set in motion now.

          Reply
          1. Dan Anderson

            Interestingly, in South Africa, the part of Africa hit hard by Covid, the masks, social distancing (or other) seems to have had great impact on the seasonal flu which is greatly lessened. (sorry I don’t have numbers for my use of “great”). As I see it, tho, there is nothing good, no silver lining in Covid.

    1. Joe Dopelle

      “But reports show that what it takes diabetes decades to do in atherosclerotic damage, covid can do in a week”.

      Let’s see the studies. Please put your links where your mouth is.

      Reply
      1. Dan Anderson

        News is saying athletes, even young ones, need hearts checked for damage from inflammation, then, too, there is this, “New research published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that the respiratory virus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, causes severe damage to blood vessels, leading to widespread thrombosis, a press release by the Angiogenesis Foundation reports.” — https://vascularnews.com/new-study-shows-covid-19-causes-blood-vessel-damage/#:~:text=New%20study%20shows%20COVID%2D19%20causes%20severe%20blood%20vessel%20damage,-22nd%20May%202020&text=Compared%20to%20the%20flu%2C%20COVID,reaction%20of%20blood%20vessel%20growth.

        Generally speaking, there is much we do not understand about this virus and its effect on our bodies. We know it isn’t good. Most all of us believe whatever it is we need to believe, generally speaking.

        Reply
        1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          The politically correct and fund-attracting ‘knowing’ that these effects assigned to a virus are directly resulting from it, is based on assumption.

          It would be scientifically correct to acknowledge that there is so much we do not understand about how biology functions as a whole, as well as in its parts in relation to the whole – and even specifically the causes of the symptoms showing in the very tiny percent of those who have the post respiratory infection ‘pneumonia-like’ complications.

          But we know flu vaccinations can modify or disrupt the underlying immune function, as well as good reason to suspect contaminants in such vaccines interacting with the natural response to a coronavirus infection.

          Which by the way suggests that such ‘infection’ is an evolved and belonging functional response to conditions, and not the condition in itself causing effects.

          Adequate vit D levels and other simple nutrients along with taking steps against toxic exposure loads would address this ‘world stopping problem’. As would enlightened compassionate but firm nursing of the health. Not the sickness.

          The covid ID – as a hacked mind in the many, WANTS to attract and weave itself into any and everything to reinforce and validate itself – as if it is You!

          One day – (or in an afterlife review) – you look back and wonder how on Earth (or rather …

          This post continues on
          https://willingness-to-listen.blogspot.com/2020/09/presuming-to-know-locks-down-mind.html

          Reply
        2. LA_Bob

          Dan, for Pete’s sake, up your game. Your linked article is dated May 22, 2020.

          Back in April, and likely before, people began to work out how COVID was killing people. It was “disseminated intravascular coagulation” — severe vasculitis — and often called “Death is Coming”. These findings became the basis for treatment with blood thinners and steroids.

          Remember, Dan, we’re talking about very sick, typically very old people. People in nursing homes, for example. Not young, vigorous people masked up in public with asymptomatic or mild COVID.

          So, Dan, we’ve known for months COVID can cause vasculitis. If you get a bad enough case. Which is rare.

          Dr Kendrick wrote a post about it. In June.

          Up your game, Dan.

          Reply
    2. Terry Wright

      Dr Pharter; I can’t find you on the GMC register; could this be a troll name; a passing of wind? an eructation? Certainly you or some of your relatives are keen on cycling https://rec.bicycles.racing.narkive.com/q12E4bt9/nbc-has-ruined-the-tour-de-france-and-where-the-f-ck-is-magilla-gorilla

      “covid can do in a week.” …. well, the media can do it, in a week, a day, an article, on behalf of our friend, the rona. Rona has had a fantastic PR campaign. As Dr K says, can you cite any evidence for this fantastic myth that is so pervasive; that rona is unique and harmful and long-term;

      Reply
  10. merrilie2015

    Thank you for the update which is very good news but extremely frustrating that it will not be listened to by those in authority, who seem intent in leading us in the totally opposite direction. I hope this gets out to the larger population and I will certainly circulate it to as many people as possible.
    Please keep on with the good work and lets hope it is eventually listened to and acts on.

    Reply
  11. Jean Humphreys

    Good for Sweden! And woe for us. The way things are here, I have to quietly ask if any of Them realise how stupid they are getting to appear. And ask if anyone has read “Stasiland” lately?
    Thanks Dr. K for showing this to us.

    Reply
  12. Ken Garoo

    “As I mentioned in my first article, lockdown only makes sense if you are willing to stay in lockdown until there is an effective vaccine.”

    And there you have the answer. The UK lockdown will be kept in place by hook and crook until there is a patentable vaccine that doesn’t kill or maim too many people. My guess is the current estimate for delivery is about 6 months.

    Does anyone know the proceedure for raising the question of medical fraud or quakery?

    Reply
    1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

      The covid vaccine set a gold rush for biotech developments across the board – not least under the B@MG foundation. A bit like using cunning and wealth to coral the coding skills and bind them to an effective monopoly system – while shutting down rivals.

      Whenever there are such gold rushes – there are also great private fortunes to be made from investors seeking a bit of the action promised but never delievered. Fraud? Who would have thought it.

      But the biosecurity system is the prize that is being prised into our mind-conditioning as perpetual infection or effectively sin that must be atoned for or temporary remissions assigned for compliance.

      Reply
  13. John Duffy

    As Boris threatens to speak to the nation tomorrow September 22 I think we all know what’s coming. The discredited Sage advice will be implemented resulting in another lockdown. One fears for the catastrophic effects on those unfortunates who suffer from other serious health conditions. Of course contingency plans will be put in place to address those. Won’t they??? We are now so conditioned that we will, in the main accept the government dictats. We will convince ourselves that we are all in this together when in reality they they have so terrified us into submission, backed by a largely uncritical media, that we will swallow whatever colour of pill keeps us in thrall to the consensus agenda. So we will snitch on our neighbours, maybe even our family, accept draconian measures, fines, social disapproval and stay lockeddown like naughty kids who have helped spread this nasty virus. If we had done what we were told then we would not have had to lock down. It’s our fault. Mea culpa. Meanwhile the virus lurks on the edges of our ghost towns quietly waiting for us to re-emerge so it can do what viruses do – infect and spread. When the people come to embrace their servitude and call it freedom or when to be crude, they piss on us and we say it’s raining then the battle for minds is pretty well over. Despite all I will try not to despair. Let the virus do its worst-protect the most vulnerable, manage risk as best you can, be hygienic, be sensible about social contact, have Covid free hospitals and treat all sick people as in pre-Coruna days. Learn to distinguish wise advice from government nonsense and think and act in a manner befitting a sensitive. responsible adult. Thank you Dr. Kendrick for your wonderful blogs in these panic driven times.

    Reply
  14. gillpurple

    Thank you Malcolm and Dr Rushworth. Great news – now to get our PM, the government and their advisers to open their minds, listen and consider a different way forwards. I imagine that’s probably a tad difficult when there are already some enormous commercial vested interest at play.

    Reply
  15. johnplatinumgoss

    I remember Sebastian’s article well. He does write well but so do you. His article gave me hope that we might adopt similar policies. Unfortunately that has not been the case. This has been the case. This is the reality here.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/saveourrightsuk/permalink/1254007584959882/

    What is worse a draft document is being rushed through parliament this week which will exonerate vaccine and drugs producers from culpability should an untested vaccine cause problems in those they try it on. I have written to my MP about this and the letter is on my blog. In it I do not mince my words.

    Reply
  16. abamji

    This together with the Oxford analysis suggesting that the majority of positive tests do not represent a new infection makes further lockdowns redundant. I find it hard to understand why serious epidemiologists and others advising the government cannot see this, but suggest that all UK readers write to their MP with a link to the data. I have already done this, referencing https://www.hdruk.ac.uk/projects/false-positives/ and https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.26.20080911v3.full.pdf.

    The Swedish experience merely confirms this. There has been an increase in UK hospital admissions but not a very large one and it appears to be levelling off again – without any new lockdown yet in place.

    Reply
      1. Jennifer

        AhNotepad, My Tory MP will have received my letter already. Maybe a response by Christmas?
        Pre-Brexit, it took a month to receive a mere acknowledgement regarding my fear of the importation of essential medications. I got a mealy mouthed response only after saying I would be by-passing him and writing directly to the Secretary of State for Health.
        Democracy? I reckon the obsolete word will be dropped from the dictionary soon.

        Reply
        1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          In a book I read on the secret history of the first world war – which gives a structure even then for understanding how institutional process can be sidelined, coopted, fooled and tooled, this was referred to as “ignoring the shouters”.

          Reply
    1. dcfl51

      Very interesting reports. Thank you.

      In the first report, the 29% correct positive result is a calculated figure. If the infection prevalence is 0.05% then a random sample of 100,000 members of the population should include 50 infected persons. If the test has a sensitivity of 80% then only 40 of these people would be detected by the test. But if the test has a specificity of 99.9% then 0.1% of the population, i.e. 100 people without the virus, would be detected as positive. So there would be 140 positive tests of which only 40 (29%) would be correct.

      The assertion in this report that the accuracy can be improved to almost 100% by carrying out a second test is not justified. It depends on why the original false result happened. Do the tests create false results on a random basis or were there circumstances or swab sample characteristics which induced a false result for a particular participant ? If the latter then, if the same circumstances or sample characteristics are present for the second test, you can expect to get the same result.

      The second report looks at samples which have tested positive using PCR tests and attempts to grow viral cultures from them in the laboratory. This is the gold standard for detection of an active and viable virus, although it is not feasible or practicable for mass testing. Looking at table 4 and combining the results from the different papers studied, I calculate that it was possible to culture the virus in only 29% of cases, which is in agreement with the first report. So, only 29% of the positive cases studied were from infectious people who needed to be kept apart from the uninfected population.

      The second report also included studies which looked at people who had tested negative and been discharged after having had the virus, and who subsequently re-tested positive. Four theories were considered and it was concluded that re-infection did not fit the facts. They could not grow a viral culture in the laboratory from any of the 108 participants. So, it seems that you can’t catch covid-19 twice, at least, not within the current time frame.

      The PCR test does not produce a yes/no answer. The result depends upon the cycle count threshold (ct). You could possibly get a positive result from most people if the ct were set high enough but then you are detecting trivial quantities of viral fragments. The ct for detecting all cases of infectious persons is not standardised but appears to be lower than the ct commonly being used. The viral load, the stage of the infection, the time between sample collection and testing, the gene fragment being tested for, and the manufacturer of the testing kit all seem to affect the outcome of the test.

      Reply
      1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

        I have interesting, referenced material, which makes it clear that the specificity of the main PCR test used in the UK is 98.6%. Which, if we are doing 200,000 tests a day, means that we could have 2,800 false positives tests per day. Then, a false positive case enters hospital, then dies. They will be recorded as a Covid19 death – no matter what they died of. So, the rate of false positives not only impacts the number of ‘cases’, it also impacts hospital admission with Covid19, and deaths from Covid19.

        Reply
        1. David Bailey

          Thanks for that comment Malcolm,

          It seems to me there is a curious resemblance between the climate change hysteria and this hysteria. All kinds of arguments (either officially, or via the BBC/Guardian) are produced without the slightest attempt at statistical rigor – or even plain fairness. Thus, for example the BBC is happy to cherry pick the temperature data to find any hot period of arbitrary length that it can present as the hottest ever (never the coldest ever) without ever mentioning the statistical distortion that produces. Last year they even trumpeted the hottest Easter ever – even though Easter is a movable feast! It is generally left unclear whether these claims come from the Met Office, or are concocted within the BBC. This leaves a certain safety net – if enough people object, the official bodies can quietly disown the idea.

          I mean surely after all these months we would have a way of presenting the data for this disease in a hospital setting – it was maybe excusable at the start of the year, but not now.

          If I were a conspiracy theorist, I’d swear this is being done deliberately with the intention to damage our society.

          Reply
          1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            There is no conspiracy – if it is indeed all out in the open.
            Both offer a core control agenda over what once were freedoms lived – and regardless any opinions now, the carbon regulations are in place and are meshed with biosecurity data as your ‘passport’. Then the conditions that allow breathing space on Foxy Loxy’s back will diminish and you enter the Gates’s hell or die in a home that has become a death camp.
            This is rather starkly put and regardless the trends and threats or drooling desires of the dream of techno-genetic control over human carbon units – may never come to pass.

            But it is no secret that the old normal or residual values of our traditional inheritance are targeted and set to be destroyed so as to make a new world order.
            The means to do so are ANYTHING that can be leveraged to achieve its goal.
            The leveraging or manipulation by deceit are the common purpose that looks kindly on societal destruction running to plan, and harshly on any movement towards regaining Consciousness.
            Groupthink is not conscious, nor might I add is a like reaction set against it terms.

        2. Tim

          So does that mean that if someone is false positive and next year is run over by a steamroller and has to be scrapped off the tarmac; they will still be recorded as death from Covid19?

          Reply
        3. David Bailey

          Malcolm,

          By ‘specificity’ I take it you mean that another test of the same type would agree 98.6% of the time – not that it would necessarily test for CV19, or indeed a virus at all.

          Would autopsies cut through the confusion between dying of CV19 and dying with it. 100 autopsies on randomly selected people who were certified to have died of CV19 would be revealing, would it not? I realise they would have to be performed in specially protected labs, but am I right that they might reveal something very interesting?

          Reply
        4. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          Without detracting from your revealing of how false positives play out statistically. I understand that PCR tests are not testing viral load, which would be a significant factor with at least a nod towards Koch’s postulates.

          Nor to my sense has the reconstituted fragments that were determined with computer assistance to be the original virus – from which the testing primers are (variously) selected been proven to ONLY be a novel virus – rather than a mixture of DNA and RNA fragments from breakdown of dead cell and other viral cell expression.

          Nor as of yet has the virus been demonstrated to be THE Cause of a specific or any clinical disease.

          So the indeterminate presumptions and variables in this active narrative are so great as to be able to assign almost anything and nothing to it – and in due course feed it, or vanish it by any set of tests and treatments.

          That Something is going on is evident. What we determine that to be, includes our reaction to the meanings we give it. Establishing ’cause’ may be upstream to the currently accepted narrative meanings – in which we could search forever and a day, finding no solution, and protecting the problem under guise of solving it.

          I appreciate that for those deeply invested IN the narrative, questioning it isn’t feasible – but revealing inconsistencies within it, can call parts of it into question, and open curiosity and capacity for an appreciation of truth.

          Reply
          1. Gery

            Thanks Binra…………I feel that you are perhaps one who ‘sees’ the wood (forest) rather than just the trees………?

      2. David Bailey

        I have read suggestions that there are other problems associated with increasing the number of cycles, and that at 60 cycles these tests always return a positive result! I wish that they didn’t just record the number of positive tests, but also the number of cycles used to obtain them.

        After all, if you perform one organic chemical reaction, you will generally get some bi-products, and if you don’t actually isolate the desired intermediate product, but go on to the next step, there will be even less of the desired product compared with bi-products. I am sure these tests are designed very carefully, and of course the steps are being performed enzymatically, but even so, with three steps per cycle (I think) that is an awful lot of steps.

        This may be why the inventor of PCR, Karry Mullis, explicitly warned that his reaction should not be used to screen for a disease.

        I think the first step towards sanity would be to take 5000 randomly selected test kits and apply them to biological material that could be reasonably assured to be COVID free (does any exist?) to get an empiricle measure of the false positive rate.

        Reply
        1. Gery

          i suggest the BEST course of action is to STOP TESTING COMPLETELY, stop TALKING about testing and focus on the REAL ISSUE. WHICH IS OF COURSE, OUR FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOM AND OUR HEALTH. STOP LOOKING AT THE TREES AND TRY AND SEE THE WOOD…….as the quote sort of goes!

          Reply
      3. JohnC

        I think that the cycle count used in England lies between 40 and 45, from what Carl Henighan said. That is anywhere between 1 trillion and 32 trillion strands of DNA per single RNA strand.
        I have seen somewhere that tap water tested positive. If so we should stop drinking. Fruit and vegetables have also produced positive results, so we should stop eating. It has also been found in faeces, so we should stop going to the toilet. That will guarantee that the virus has been beaten as there are no more hosts for it to infect.

        Reply
          1. shirley3349

            During the early HIV/AIDS outbreak in the 1980s, nursing staff like myself used antiseptic tablets, which smelled like bleach when dissolved in water, to clean down patients’ beds and lockers in an NHS hospital. We were told this solution killed that virus on such surfaces.

        1. David Lilley

          A cycle count of 40-45 seems excessively high. Further up this thread there is a link to a pre-print from the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine. This is a literature review of studies which assess the accuracy of mass testing by attempting to culture the virus from positive PCR test samples in the laboratory. I’m just a lay person and the pre-print is a bit technical for me. But, if I understood the report, one of the findings was that all samples from infectious persons could be detected in far fewer than 40 cycles. At least one of the papers in the study suggests less than 30 cycles. The authorities really only need to be concerned with identifying infectious persons. If they are doing 40-45 cycles, no wonder so many asymptomatic people are testing positive.

          Reply
    2. AhNotepad

      abamji, I have writen a blunt letter to my MP using the links for reference, and pointing out the falsehoods in the PM’s latest address.

      Reply
  17. Phil von Hauenschild

    Very much enjoying this blog. Today our Chief Scientific advisers (UK) – no politicians for some reason… have said that with the exponential rise in “cases” ( testing PCR positives i.e. infection rate tests) we will have a hospital admission rate for Covid-19 in November of 200 a day. I cannot see those numbers in the ONS (UK) or other predictors? What are they basing the predictors on?

    Reply
  18. David W

    Thank you Dr. Kendrick and Dr. Sebastian Rushworth for the information

    The current and proposed new lock down and restrictions make no sense because they are being used as part of a bigger agenda. No amount of proof will change this government’s plans. Google ‘The Great Reset’ they are not hiding their plans. All tied into the Global Warming agenda.

    https://www.weforum.org/great-reset

    Reply
    1. anonymous

      If I were allowed to use a little dark humour, I would say that in Cuba there is very little food to go around and they are always hungry and hopeless. Valter Longo says that expands longevity. Perhaps any time they get infected with anything, the Cuban’s cells just eat it and leave no footprints behind.

      But I am not allowed to use this kind of humour anymore, so don’t read upstairs.

      Reply
    2. Frango Asado

      Cuba has always had a marvellous medical system – since Castro took over anyway – but it’s ignored by the USA and all its poodles because it’s “socialist” (and therefore wicked).

      Reply
  19. LA_Bob

    Thanks very much for the Rushworth update (and, by the way, what a slew of articles lately. It’s getting hard to keep up).

    “My interpretation is that they went into lockdown too late for it to have any noticeable impact on the spread of the disease.”

    Correlates well with the Penn State study which suggested the infection rate in the US was 80 times what it was thought to be when the lockdowns began. We slammed the barn door shut after the horses had long since run away.

    Reply
  20. anonym

    I love the last paragraph.

    I do not believe in elections, but at this point we should ask ourselves, Is it possible that all elections are going to be suspended for several years in the countries who are at war against reality?

    Also, everyone doubts the electronic voting systems. They are so easy to manipulate. I wonder if this year in the USA there will be more votes than voters. Not that such thing is unheard of, but in this day and age it would be notoriously funny. They will have to “smooth” the recounts, without changing the results.

    Will all this be magically over right after their stupid presidential election?

    Reply
    1. Joe Dopelle

      “Is it possible that all elections are going to be suspended for several years in the countries who are at war against reality?”

      One might also ask whether that ould matter at all, since there are no political parties that stand any chance of being elected that would have acted any differently.

      When did you last hear the Labour Party disagree with anything the government has said or done about Covid-19?

      In my case the answer is “never”.

      Reply
  21. js290

    Is “herd immunity” a scientifically falsifiable concept, or is it tautology?

    CONSIDERATIONS ON HERD IMMUNITYI'm reading a few threads showing that in most cities where 20%+ of the population got antibodies, COVID cases drops.That's great.However, it might not be as simple.Some considerations in this thread (1/N).— Luca Dellanna – Luca-Dellanna.com (@DellAnnaLuca) August 27, 2020

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      I have always been skeptical about logical positivist and critical rationalism. I consider them to be among the pseudophilosophies that despots love. Whenever reality rebels against the teachings of the Popperians, then they unleash the sophistry: Changing word meanings in the middle of a river crossing, mixing up metaphors, not giving references or numbers, and suchlike.

      One question. We have always had infectious diseases. All species have infectious diseases. For 99.9999% percent of the time, no one had life saving propaganda, persuasion techniques, public health strategists, statistical analysis, drugs, doctors, chemicals, or electricity to produce heat and light. Yet, we survived. How come all these horrible things ended then, but they will not end now?

      If you have a better answer (with numbers, please) than the herd immunity concept, then tell us. If you are just an idle talker, then stop your course and start to study something true.

      Use your common sense, brother!

      Reply
  22. Jean Hughes

    Sweden I understand has a functioning welfare system and little poverty. It also has a small population compared to UK. Who are the people who have died age gender etc ? What is the quality of housing in Stockholm. It is possible that the price we pay in the number of deaths is too high a price. It is interesting that people here have reported severe health issues following covid

    Reply
  23. Jeremy May

    Testing, with it’s duff results and untrustworthy parameters seems to be driving us to destruction.

    If our response to Covid was based on the nuts and bolts of what really matters – hospital admissions and deaths (from not with covid), there would be no frenzy and my wife and I would be able to go and enjoy a roast lamb dinner with my brother and his wife.

    200 admissions was it yesterday? 11 deaths?
    800+ daily deaths at the height of it in April!

    Reply
  24. Steve

    I sent Dr. Kendrick’s 19th September article to my MP, I asked him if he would use the information contained in it to inform his voting intentions in the commons when the Coronavirus Act 2020 comes up for renewal shortly, I have received no reply from him nor do I expect one given past performance. However, never daunted I will send this latest information in the hope that eventually some sanity can be injected (pun not intended) into the national debate.
    Valance and Whitty seem to be obsessed about the parallels between Spain and Italy’s second wave and the expected arrival of same here, I believe that there is good evidence to contradict this expectation which can be found discussed here:

    Reply
  25. qualcunaltro8

    Hm. It’s very far from clear that this is correct.

    Looking at the figures, Sweden has a total population of 10.23 million, spread over 450,000km. Greece, by comparison, has 10.72m people, in a land area of 131,000km.

    That is, Greece’s population is larger and its population density is almost five times greater.

    But.

    Greece has had 3,426 cases. Sweden has had more than 88,000. An enormously greater number (about 22 times as many).

    But OK, what about the deaths? Surely that’s most important?

    Arguably, yes.
    But here the situation is almost as bad. Greece has had 334 deaths from Corona. Sweden 5,865.

    So Sweden has had close to 18 times as many deaths as Greece, despite a lower population, MUCH lower population density AND an objectively better health service and overall level of wealth.

    Perhaps (perhaps) Sweden has achieved herd immunity (though at a relatively ENORMOUS cost) but we just don’t know: a second wave could still happen. Any statement on that is simply speculation right now.

    Does this ‘prove’ lockdown works? No, not really.

    But we should note that when comparing like with like (and in fact, Sweden should have EVERY advantage here: lower population, far lower population density, far greater wealth and far better health service than Greece) Sweden has in fact done exceptionally badly.

    Reply
    1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

      More people, as a proportion of the population, live in cities in Sweden than in the UK. If you want to pick and choose countries, how about Peru. Strictest knockdown in the world. Highest death rate from Covid. Or Japan, no lockdown, and a lower percentage of deaths than Greece. How about Kenya IFR 0.00023%. You can make any argument you want picking and choosing individual countries. One could argue that Sweden has paid an ENORMOUS cost. One could equally argue that every other country in the world is going to end up paying pretty much the same ENORMOUS cost. But they will do it more slowly, whilst obliterating their economies with pointless lockdowns.

      Reply
        1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

          Some of them, certainly. I note that Anthony Fauci has now stated that he has been taking vitamin C, and D, from the start. 1 gram vitamin C and 5000 units of Vitamin D. [Do as I say, not as I do, Fauci].

          Reply
  26. Jean Humphreys

    So now there will be curfews and pubs and restaurants will shut at ten pm. We all know that The Virus is not infectious until after ten, so is it wise to make a curfew and chuck all the punters out into the street in a crowd, just as The Virus fires up its infectivity drive? And how to manage this when the clocks go back? Who is going to tell The Virus?
    Reminds me of a little tale I read as a child, where the punch line was Littlest Mouse saying, “But who is going to bell the cat?”

    Reply
    1. Gery

      And so surely the most important question here is………why are we tolerating this tyrannical nonsense??? When / where / how do we draw the line, people?

      Reply
  27. Tim

    Great article ( Sorry about my spelling as I’m Disleksic) and as usual a wonderful way to put us all at ease. Amazing to think that there are more viruses on earth than stars in the universe. And yet almost everyone has still got their heads in the sand! Because one virus is causing the world to shut down.

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      Tim, the virus is not causing the shutdown, this is being done by politicians who are either following some command line, or they are refusing to take advice from intelligent people instead of the ill informed number crunchers.

      Reply
    2. Gery

      Only ‘virus’ responsible for the current situation………is FEAR! And the fear has been engendered by spectacular global psychological brainwashing techniques (not new ones either!). This has never REALLY been about any type of corononavirus! New, old GoF mutated or otherwise. What is ACTUALLY happening is far more terrifying. Much wider bigger dangerous ‘game’ going on here.

      Reply
    3. Joe Dopelle

      “[Lita] Proctor estimated that every liter of seawater contained up to one hundred billion viruses…

      “Scientists came to agree that there are somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 [a million trillion trillion] viruses in the ocean…

      “Viruses outnumber all other residents of the ocean by about fifteen to one. If you put all the viruses of the oceans on a scale, they would equal the weight of seventy-five million blue whales”.

      – “A Planet of Viruses”, Carl Zimmer

      Reply
  28. jonny thrombosis

    Hi Malcolm, It would appear you’re not the only medical professional in the UK, questioning the government narratives. You have some pretty eminent company. You’ve probably already seen this as its been posted quite a bit on social media but just in case you haven’t seen it attached. Carry on questioning & helping to keep us fellow sceptics sane.

    Friendliest regards, John

    On Mon, 21 Sep 2020, 12:33 Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, wrote:

    > Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A few weeks ago, an emergency physician > working in Sweden, Dr. Sebastian Rushworth, asked me if I would be willing > to replicate an article from his blog on mine. I was more than happy; it > was a great article. The only problem being that his writing puts m” >

    Reply
    1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

      Not waving but drowning. As to the R number. Well, everyone is an international expert in viral epidemiology now. Some people have even heard of a T cell. I thought the R number measured the number of pirates trapped on a desert island. ‘R Jim Lad.’ Yo ho ho, and a bottle of rum.’ [Sorry can’t take the R number seriously]

      Reply
    2. JohnC

      The R number is a parameter used in the computer models. It is the theoretical number that an infected person can pass an infection onto, it has little or no correlation with reality.

      Reply
    3. Frango Asado

      The R number is a metric to worry about because a bunch of utter fools have got hold of it and are bandying it about for all the world as if they understood what it means.

      Reply
  29. Steve-R

    Can we expect the usual hypocrisy from those in Government when seasonal influenza starts taking out the vulnerable in Covid-19 quantities this winter?
    After all, surely it matters not what you die of, but how many of us are going to die unless the country is shut down every year?

    I often hear, on phone-ins (yes I know, I should get a life) that I should be wearing a face-nappy to protect the vulnerable, or be jailed/fined if I continue being irresponsible. Well, it takes two to tango. Experience so far shows that very few people have died of Covid-19 even if it was on the death certificate, the CDC estimating that only 6% of Covid-19 deaths didn’t require a co-morbidity to tip them over the edge. While I, of course, accept that some vulnerable people are blameless in their co-morbidities and should be protected by society from their effects on their health, the overwhelming majority are either significantly responsible for their co-morbidities or have been placed at risk by their precarious employment and low wages from following a healthy lifestyle.
    It is not my responsibility to protect people from their poor lifestyle choices, and this is especially so when they are forced upon them by a government that I don’t support, that has at every turn thwarted attempts to improve the health of the nation by maintaining and now encouraging a system of wage-slavery that steals both time and income.

    Meanwhile, I too have just finished reading Hope-Simpson and am now trying to find research on the ‘seasonality’ of infectious respiratory diseases. So far there is little that might explain its ubiquity but every living cell appears to respond in some way and for some unexplained reason to the effect of the 23.5 tilt of the Earth to its orbital plane around the Sun. Will SARS-CoV-2 behave like Hope-Simpson’s flu in response, does it remain as a persistent viral ‘presence’ in those previously infected, to emerge with minor epitope changes on the spike as a second wave, or have we – like Sweden – already burned through enough of the unimmune to make community transmission a rarity? We can be sure of one thing only, “time will tell”.

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      While on the subject of irresponsible with the muzzles or anything else to do with the made up as you go along rules, it’s worth remembering two people who did not get fined for breaches were Cummings and Ferguson.

      Reply
  30. firstnamebonniegmailcom

    Remember the Swedish people are very rule oriented. If their government directs them along a course of action, it will happen. Ask your Swedish colleague why everyone paints their barns the same colour. 🇨🇦Bonnie

    On Mon, Sep 21, 2020 at 4:36 AM Dr. Malcolm Kendrick wrote:

    > Dr. Malcolm Kendrick posted: “A few weeks ago, an emergency physician > working in Sweden, Dr. Sebastian Rushworth, asked me if I would be willing > to replicate an article from his blog on mine. I was more than happy; it > was a great article. The only problem being that his writing puts m” >

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      It is not a rule to paint the Swedish houses the same colour. It was because they are painted with mud paint made from the tailings from mining operations. It consists mainly of copper, and used to have lead in it. It may still have lead but I don’t know if it has or not. For a pleasant trip round a Swedish village https://youtu.be/U0J7xHCYXDY. Now you see how nice it looks, you can make your own Falu paint https://www.solventfreepaint.com/falun-red-paint.htm

      Reply
    2. Terry Wright

      Hi firstnamebonniegmailcom; thanks for a really thoughtful comment; glad to have you contribute; we look forward to more penetrating stereotypes; I understand all Canadians are very obedient, and they all drink maple syrup in autumn. Wonderful folks.

      Reply
  31. Martin Back

    Covid is most dangerous to those with co-morbidities. Ironically, by shutting down the hospitals to everyone except Covid patients, you are increasing those with co-morbidities, thus increasing the vulnerable population.

    Reply
  32. Natalie shigeta

    Thank you so much for sharing this info Dr Kendrick. I am an ER nurse who worked during sars and mers epidemics and this is no worse than those. After the first year we never saw another case in the ER. So much ado about nothing. The World wide death rate from covid remain at .005% which is very very minuscule. Chances of getting killed in a shark attack or struck by lightening are about as likely! Sincerely Natalie shigeta

    Reply
  33. PatrickSStewart

    I find it so hard to say who is right. Speaking to people who work in COVID wards is not necessarily the right thing to do – someone working on a cancer ward might have a very different perspective.

    But isn’t this N Hemisphere spike related to the change in the temperature at the end of summer? It seems likely.

    To understand both seasonality (of resp illness but not necessarily resp infection) and pathogenicity (why does this thing sometimes go to the lungs?) we should consider the natural temperature-sensitivity of most respiratory viruses. This can easily be seen – most respiratory viruses grow better in tissue culture (the more complex, realistic models anyway) at 34C than 37C.

    Some of this is explored here: https://youtu.be/l_jmqGvdeBY
    Practical suggestions: https://oldwivesandvirologists.blog/proposals-for-simple-rcrs/

    Reply
      1. PatrickSStewart

        Definitely RIGHT. It’s the only plausible explanation that is compatible observations. Experiments could clinch the question and save lives (maybe 500,000 of them). The form of the wood (seasonality) is a direct consequence of the tropism of the tree (pathogenicity of CoV-2). By thinking about this we can save trees (lives).

        Hope this makes sense – just had a beer on an empty stomach : )

        Reply
          1. PatrickSStewart

            Written on coffee.

            How am I failing to see the woods? I am dealing with both the trees (individual cases) and the woods (seasonality and epidemiology).

            We need a plausible explanation of the winter seasonality of virtually all respiratory ILLNESSES (not infections) before we can claim to understand the situation.

            When you understand something you often benefit in unexpected ways.

            Wishful thinking will not solve this problem – observation / experimentation / understanding might.

            Here are practical proposals: https://oldwivesandvirologists.blog/proposals-for-simple-rcrs

          2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            (The commenters here prefer evidence based science rather than being hit by a stick or deceived by a study called ‘the science’. So your not being understood needs to take into account an ongoing sense of being actively dis-informed or passively mis-informed under a masking in or presumption of science).

            Patrick, If I understand you right, you are passing on scientific information that verifiably finds that temperature (ambient heat) is critical to the composition of what we are calling viruses and assigning the function of pathological infection vector. Such that at higher temperatures (summer), their composition breaks down as a protein covered fragment of RNA or DNA.
            This also associates with the cooler (respiratory) regions being the receptive terrain to taking in and perhaps replicating such ‘biological information’ – as I prefer to call it.

            I feel this is a worthy facet to an understanding of seasonal detoxifications that use the lung (and snot and sweat) as a means of elimination. (That is of course my current way of seeing this 😉

            The vit D also comes into seasonality and focus on ‘covid’ has shown it to be a primary factor in ‘susceptibility’ and criticality of symptoms.

            The harnessing of predictable events by a priesthood seeking to retain control via fear and superstition is an old pattern, but still in use. Much of the covid exercise is harnessing that people get respiratory disease and that this – or complications arising from this in end of life situations gives the seasonal peak in the distribution of natural deaths – that as far as I know is the pattern of life on Earth.

            The study of the external ’causes’ or conducive conditions, can only go so far because the receptivity to taking in and replicating the information (RNA etc) is more than merely contact – and that is the realm of ‘immunity’ or susceptibility – or perhaps the need or functional activation of information because it has a resonant ‘fit’ to the receiving organism.
            This post coninues on
            https://willingness-to-listen.blogspot.com/2020/09/the-heat-death-of-virus-and-cycles-of.html

  34. Gaetan

    Dr. Kendrick, you are a beacon of light among the darkness big pharma and media cast upon us, do you know any doctor, or professor or epidemiologist, someone specialized in infectious diseases, that we could watch or listen to on youtube or another platform, who isn’t afraid to express his/her views about covid??

    Thanks.

    Reply
    1. JohnC

      A few names from YouTube
      Dr. John Lee is a pathologist, and very knowledgable.
      Ivor Cummins, although not a healthcare professional, is very good to listen to.
      Dr. Sam Bailey is a GP in New Zealand.
      Carl Heneghan and Sunetra Gupta obviously.
      Richard Ennis
      Karol Sikora
      Dr. Beda Stadler

      Reply
  35. Alan

    Maybe a little less eagerness to count chickens would be prudent. Undoubtedly recent numbers in Sweden have been promising, but to declare this thing “over” when clearly it isn’t, is rash and unhelpful.

    “Right now we are in discussions on whether we need to bring in additional restrictions to reduce the spread of infection in Stockholm,” state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell said.

    https://www.9news.com.au/world/coronavirus-sweden-new-measures-may-be-needed-after-worrying-infection-signs/b813d575-361d-47ab-8bbf-718b4e11007a

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      Alan, when the story is kept going by the results of an inappropriate and unreliable test, on what do you base your claim that “it isn’t over”?

      Reply
        1. AhNotepad

          The PCR test. The antibody test is pointless as it says there might have been an infection at sometime, but that does not mean the person is currently infected.

          Reply
          1. Alan

            The effectiveness and limitations of different tests is understood.

            Cases are starting to rise in Sweden again, like they already have in much of Europe and an increase hospitalizations is following. This is not just about test results.

          2. AhNotepad

            What is the increase in Swedish hospital admissions? I heard on ukcolumn today that some disingenuous politician/government agent that the admissions had gone up by a huge percentage. A lot like absolute risk and relative risk.

            A positive test result is not, on its own, a case.

          3. Alan

            No one is saying that the tests are perfect and all you need to get a full understanding of the situation. We understand they are more of a guide than a precise measurement and there are other factors and variability involved. But you seem to keep implying that they don’t tell us anything useful or are even completely misleading. Not true.

            I didn’t say that hospitalizations in Sweden have increased. I said they have increased in many other countries in Europe following an increase in positive tests. And that Sweden is now seeing an increase in positive test like has already happened in much of Europe.

            So I am suggesting with good reason that if Sweden continues to follow other countries with increasing numbers of positive tests, then it will eventually see an increase in hospitalizations like them also. Therefore, it’s too early to call this thing “over” for Sweden.

          4. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            I seriously contend that the tests privide mis-guidance.

            If the tests were themselves tested – not hard to do, that might be something.

            Sage minutes refers to PCR as the gold standard of tests!
            More like the fiat currency of a rigged system.
            But the gold rush that it supports is setting up the new biological lawfare system.

          5. Steve-R

            Call me a cynic, but the refusal of the programmers to permit the entry of NHS PCR test results into the, private lab dominated, test and trace apps strongly smacks of corrupt practice.
            Maybe there are clauses in the secretive contracts with the testing companies that incentivise positive tests? Maybe there are some basic incompatibilities between the different private companies that would be revealed should more ‘impartial’ NHS tests be included – for instance there may be differences in reagents used and/or numbers of cycles run between labs.
            I would certainly not accept a test result that has not been independently run in two labs that have published their test parameters on each sample from a single test.
            And all this before any consideration of whether a test is actually amplifying the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a live form (it isn’t) or whether it is just any similar sequence of RNA, or whether it is even a Defective Interfering Particle from a former infection that is neither infective nor will become infective but is just the way the parasite maintains its presence in us, it’s host.

          6. Alan

            There are increasing hospitalizations in places like Spain and France where cases began ti rise again ahead of Sweden. But since it is evident that Sweden is following with rising cases, so it will with hospitalizations if the trend continues.

            Just watch this space! Like I said, it’s not over yet.

    2. IMoz

      I suspect the answer from Tegnell would be along the lines of: “go study the epidemiology of seasonal respiratory infections; and while you’re at it, figure out what a qRT-PCR test actually tells you” 😉

      Reply
  36. Barbara

    Thanks for the article. Just wondering did Sweden restrict vistors and tourists from entry? Or have quarantine requirements? Can u say what the desth rate for this period was in pre- Covid years ?

    Reply
  37. Mark Heneghan

    We have massive hospital capacity (eg our Rugby Stadium in Cardiff) so why don’t we see if the low mortality that the current data suggests is true and carry on with social distancing and hand washing? We will soon know we are wrong if/ when the hospital admissions rise above seasonal normal.

    Reply
  38. Martin

    According to the records, Sweden has lost approx 123,000 people in the last year. How much of that figure is the true amount due to Covid 19? Also most of the population is spread around the country just over 10 million people in total. So quite a low population compared to most of the European countries. The article says that just under 6,000 people have died: I think a lot more going by the figure above in proportion. Going by the statistics of other countries, I would say that that is a higher amount per population! Now that the kids are going back to school, I think the infection figures will rise again, just like everywhere else in the world.

    Reply
      1. David Bailey

        Malcolm,

        Thanks for being on hand to squash the uninformed comments that have only turned up here in recent weeks. Part of the problem nowadays is that accurate information can be drowned out by a hire hose of rubbish.

        Reply
    1. Martin Back

      From the graph, it is apparent that the current pandemic resulted in a similar death toll per million as previous really bad flu seasons. One difference is that it happened in April-May, whereas the flu seasons were December-January. Also notice the fine dotted lines. Last year, 2019, was a year where the average death toll per week for the year was unusually low, which meant a larger number than usual of people near death were carried forward into 2020.

      Reply
  39. Carole

    Dr. Kendrick, could you kindly look at this Huffpost article about PCR false positive rates, and give your interpretation please? I understand the maths but I don’t know if the prevalance rate of disease in the general population should be used to calculate False Positive Rate, or the prevalance rate of disease in the group being tested. This article seems to be saying it should be the latter. I think Dr. Carl Heneghan and Michael Yeadon know what they’re talking about.( I don’t look to Huffpost as a source of information generally, this just popped up on my phone.)
    Thank you
    https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/false-positives-coronavirus_uk_5f686da4c5b6de79b677e909?f57

    Reply
    1. JP Sand

      Hi Carole,

      The Huffington Post story, quite weirdly, alleges that the issue of false-positive tests is being primarily “promoted by a small and vocal group of journalists”, who are then called out by name — one of whom is Lockdown Sceptics blog author Toby Jones. There was also another story to this effect at the UnHerd website yesterday. Thankfully, Toby Jones has just written a response to the UnHerd article and quite deftly counters these arguments that are now trying to minimize the importance of false-positives. Please see his post today (dated September 23, 2020), titled: “A Reply to Tom Chivers” https://lockdownsceptics.org/

      Reply
    2. Jerome Savage

      More huff n puff. No one ever stated here that I can recall, that 91% of positive outcomes are false. It has been stated that over 2% are false.
      Initially I recall a report from China that referred to 50% false positives back at the onset.
      It could be suggested, (not by Dr. K.) that the swab can pick up Virus traces
      so indicating a positive but, except for the very vulnerable, the body’s own mucus & innate immune system will have seen the Virus off. This suggests other problems with the official figures.

      Reply
    3. Carole

      OK, having read through the article again, it seems that to calculate the FPR in the people that are being tested because they have symptoms, we need to know what the disease prevalence is in that group of people. Presumably the disease prevalence is expected to be higher in that group of people as opposed to the people in the weekly ONS study who are just random people throughout the UK. Anyone know how to find out the disease prevalence in people who seek out a PCR test? The author of this article doesn’t give any suggestion as to what it might be to reach whatever his version of the FPR is. Having done a quick google I read that the prevalence value is influenced by the study group dimension. I don’t know exactly what that means, the size of the group? the nature of the group ie people with symptoms as opposed to random people?
      Dr. Kendrick?

      Reply
    1. Dr. John H

      Good one!

      He makes a very good point about his suspicion that the governor is taking bribe money from the “Homeless Industrial Complex” 🙂

      Reply
  40. Terry Wright

    Thanks Carole;

    I (like many others?) .. am fascinated; that a “journalist” seems to function as a Govt PR agent: yes, Chris York, I am talking about you. Propagator of propaganda; from the Ministry of Truth.

    To answer your point Carole, when York says

    “At this point we hand over to Sam Watson, senior lecturer at Birmingham University, who told HuffPost UK: “Imagine 1,000 people turn up to the testing centre, and only one person has Covid. That one person has a positive test.

    “Of the remaining 999 people, if the FPR is 1%, then you’ll get another nine positive tests from these 999

    “So now you’ve got 10 positive tests, but only one of them has covid, so 90% of the positive tests don’t actually have covid.””

    That seems a very good summary; of a truth; at York seems to be trying to wriggle out of; by quoting all sorts of stuff; it is what Julia HB has been saying clearly.

    York asserts: “Positive test rates are going up as a percentage of total tests – this is not disputed. ” .. however he does not show any facts to support this assertion of his: no timeline is given;

    no-one repeats these shonky PCR tests: (as Michael Yardon has suggested should be mandatory);

    So we go from York “explaining”: his article starts:

    “Experts explain” …… well, I can only count 2: York himself!! and his second “expert who warns”: beware this category …… “experts who warn …”

    York also quotes “Dr Dominic Pimenta” https://heightzone.com/dr-dominic-pimenta/

    This curious gentleman has been active on twitter: Ivor Cummins has fended off the “you are all going to die” line that Pimenta has been pushing: trying to use facts against hyperbole;

    It is curious that York uses Pimenta; a cardiology registrar somewhere in London; as his single authoritative source! Pimenta is asked to finish and says ““What’s really dangerous here is eroding the trust in the test and trace system, based on supposition,”

    the test and track is based on supposition? Well, many of us would agree with that, Dominic.

    Reply
  41. Terry Wright

    more on the meaningless chant of “protect the elderly”:this empty piece of virtue-signalling;

    so you mean: lock them up for 6 months? That is the highest form of caring? Did you ever ask them?

    and https://twitter.com/lagerth13136056/status/1308891943397715978

    Reply
  42. Martin Back

    Why do the British (dark blue line) with a peak rate of 14.1 deaths per million die at nearly ten times the rate of Norwegians (green line) with a peak rate of 1.5 deaths per million? I don’t know. I don’t think government policy is the whole answer.

    At the end of the day, I think you can only compare a country’s response to Covid with its response to previous pandemics.Comparing country to country, you can prove almost any theory by selecting the appropriate pair.

    Reply
  43. starcom

    After reading these posts, my understanding is that the current PCR testing was never intended as a diagnostic test, it’s testing for the wrong thing (antibodies) and therefore doesn’t show the you “have” the disease or are infectious. It just shows that you have, at sometime, been exposed to it. It is incorrect to say that you are a case. For example if I had a measles antibody test it would quite possibly be positive, but that doesn’t mean I have it, or can pass it on.

    If this is indeed true, then surely, more testing will never result in a reduction in numbers, the number can never go down because as more of the population become quietly exposed to the virus the antibody detection rate will just keep rising. It then follows that the daily “case” reporting is at best misleading and, at worst blatantly incorrect and irresponsible. Based on the current approach you can never not be a case after a positive test. The rising number of “cases” should be applauded as it offers a sign of herd immunity – is that correct?

    I’m not a medic, could someone with better understanding than me confirm if I have understood this, and summarised it correctly?

    Reply
    1. Joe Dopelle

      I’m not a medic either, but I can tell you that PCR does not look for antibodies. It looks for certain very short fragments of DNA that someone believes are “typical” of a given virus. But this is heatedly disputed by other authorities, who say that the DNA fragments may come from dead “ex-viruses” (“Norwegian Blue viruses”?) that were defeated by the immune system long ago. Yet others say that the PCR tests may be triggered by purely human DNA fragments, with no virus involved at all.

      Moreover, the inventor of PCR – Kary Mullis – who got the Nobel Prize for that invention, explicitly warned that it was wholly unsuitable for diagnosis. It is a manufacturing technique that can take a tiny scrap of specific DNA and multiply it millions and trillions of times. But if the original tiny scrap is not what it is thought to be, all that means nothing.

      Lastly, even the very best PCR tests done under lab conditions have a definite false positive rate, and in the field, operated by inexperienced novices, the error rate goes up alarmingly. Some of the mass kits sent out by organisations like the CDC in America turned out to be contaminated so that they always showed positive. The president of Tanzania, who has a doctorate in chemistry, asked his experts to test material from a goat and a pawpaw fruit, which reportedly both tested positive for Covid-19. https://www.npr.org/2020/05/11/854115407/tanzanias-president-blames-fake-positive-tests-in-the-spike-in-coronavirus-cases?t=1600960116967

      Reply
      1. Joe Dopelle

        Here it is, right from the camel’s mouth: Kary Mullis explains exactly why PCR is wholly unsuitable for diagnosis.

        See it before they remove it!

        Reply
          1. David Bailey

            I think what Karry Mullis is saying in part is that it does not detect the AIDS virus, it detects a scrap of RNA believed to be part of the AIDS virus – maybe just one molecule. However he then mentioned the mass of other viruses and viral fragments that might be present in such a person – particularly if they were sick – and I think the implication was that one of those myriad viruses might also contain that same scrap of RNA.

            Obviously in the present context, replace AIDS by COVID (they are both RNA viruses).

            That, I think is why he says the PCR test is not suitable as a medical test – particularly if the amplification factor is really high.

        1. Martin Back

          Kary Mullis is in “cover your ass” mode. Basically he’s saying that that there’s nothing wrong with his DNA multiplying technique, but if it’s misused, don’t blame him. His reasoning being that there’s so much DNA or RNA floating around in any biological sample, it’s possible there exists an identical sequence to the sequence of interest but derived from a different organism’s DNA, and PCR will multiply it. PCR cannot guarantee that the sequence multiplied comes from what you think it comes from.

          He’s throwing the blame for any failure on those who selected the DNA sequence being tested for. If they didn’t choose a unique enough sequence, it’s not his fault.

          Reply
          1. Martin Back

            Not to mention, what’s the biggest source of the RNA fragments they are testing for? Why, in the laboratories themselves, where any bit of RNA is multiplied a zillion times by the PCR test. It’s an RNA factory.

            And if a whole virus can float in the air for hours,as alleged, then how long can a bit of RNA stay suspended? Long enough to settle on every bit of laboratory equipment where it can be detected by the very sensitive PCR test, unless the most scrupulous cleaning and air conditioning protocols have been observed.

            I’d love to know what percentage of positive results are coming from contaminated samples..

    2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

      RT-PCR testing is NOT an antibody test.
      It is primed with samples of genetic code supposedly unique to the (supposedly identified) virus it is set to seek for and register a match by a magnification of the results to the ‘sweet spot’ after which artefacts or noise drown the signal – which can be in our terms infinitesimal – hence NOT a measure of the amount of virus but an indicator of its presence.
      It doesn’t need a 100% match, and the parameters for how close a match is accepted as a match seem to vary but I have seen 80%.
      It has been pointed out the the genetic difference between a human and a chimpanzee is 1%).

      As the tests can use different primers, and be run a different number of times and take samples in different ways – perhaps under different procedures of rigorous isolation from contamination, they are THEMSELVES UNTESTED and simply not fit for the purpose they are being used for. A fact made public by one of its Nobel winning inventors and many others.

      Yet even if the test was 100% accurate with no noise or error (impossible but I posit to make a point), the ‘original code signature’ of the virus is a composite of fragments woven back together by computer programs as a recreation of what the virus should look like if one could actually be definitively found and identified and shown to be the cause of disease.

      The actual samples – of very very few Wuhan cases – were not so definitively identified, but rather ‘located’ in a mix of code fragments that could have and surely did contain all kinds of matters – such a broken down cellular debris (that the body of living cells and its agencies recycle and perhaps communicates through).

      So there is no gold standard from which to derive reliable currency of fact. But as with the financial sector, there are ‘priesthoods’ of established elitism that ‘look after us’.
      The ‘discoverers’ of the novel thingamajig stated on the study that no proof of cause was claimed – not tested for. Everything you read from …

      continued on
      https://willingness-to-listen.blogspot.com/2020/09/test-tests-and-testers-as-well-as.html

      Reply
      1. PatrickSStewart

        Binra, (replying to your previous message) the Temperature-Dependent Viral Tropism hypothesis is much simpler than you suggest.

        RNA is inherently temperature-sensitive (leave protein out of it for the time being). There are many “RNA thermometers” in nature, probably including some in humans.

        When the temperature goes above around 34 C the RNA flips and the virus stops replicating.

        That way the infection stays in the nose and throat and doesn’t go to the lungs.

        So the host keeps moving around, spreading the virus.

        See https://youtu.be/l_jmqGvdeBY

        Short version: https://oldwivesandvirologists.blog/a-conversation-with-my-friend-brian/

        Reply
        1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          What exactly ‘flips’ or does ‘flip’ mean?
          I hold that the virus is said to replicate, but the fact is that living cells replicate the virus, and so either the ‘flipping virus’ now codes its receptor cell with ‘do not replicate’ or is for other reasons unable to be replicated.

          Are you aware of any studies the undeniably demonstrate infection from one person to another?
          (Yes I know we generally take it as self evident).

          I am aware that bacterial communications communicate throughout the biosphere (life on earth) and provide the basis for more complex forms of life to adapt to challenging and changing conditions.
          In the light of the enormous consequence of untested or accepted assumptions, I choose to question them. I am not questioning that people have respiratory disease symptoms – nor that viral and bacterial agents play a role in them or complications arising from them.

          Reply
    3. JohnC

      This video explains the RT-PCR process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yexcogLsK3U&t=693s.
      The RT is reverse transcriptase which turns RNA into DNA.
      The PCR then duplicates the piece of DNA.
      This is then repeated a number of times, currently it is anywhere between 40 and 42 times.
      This gives a real exponential duplication resulting in a trillion pieces of DNA at the end of the sequence.
      If I’ve got this right, depending on the reagents used different sequences of the RNA bases can be detected. It is suggested that one sequence of RNA bases associated with SARS-COV-2 corresponds to part of the human genome gene 8. This is the subject of the video referred to above.

      Reply
      1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

        Yes.
        The prequel to all of that is the exact process of ‘isolating the virus’ – it wasn’t – and so what was ‘discovered’ and composited from fragments with computer assistance and asserted as The Definition (code) of a novel virus – is actually indeterminate. (Could be any number of things).
        The primers (short code strings supposed to be unique identifiers for this ‘virus’) vary as to other parameters – such as how many times the test is run (how much the original is magnified before losing signal to noise).

        Everything is founded on ‘dodgy’ premises.
        With an increasing lack of concern for clinical disease – because the ‘money and the power’ want infection parameters they can demonise and medicalise the ‘healthy’ with under such terms as risk of infection or asymptomatic carrier.
        Its all bollox – but the fear agenda pushed to tipping point set the basis for the demonising of the non compliant, So its the sort of bollox that works every time as a means to induce otherwise peaceful people to demand war. This is a ‘soft war’ that matures from the stable of the stuff the US led West has exported to others for destabilising, undermining and degrading for ‘regime change’ and plunder.

        Reply
  44. Tish

    The testing is problematic (a kind and generous way to put it) so is it possible that we are inadvertently testing for more than one virus? Is one virus causing the chesty Covid and another giving gastrointestinal symptoms? That would explain why some people get one lot of symptoms at one time and the other different symptoms at another. It would also explain why children seem more affected by the sickness and diarrhoea “version”.

    Reply
    1. Frango Asado

      How many times during our lives have we heard, “Oh, he got sick but the doctor doesn’t know exactly what it is. Just some virus…”

      Nowadays “Just some virus…” has become “Definitely Covid-19”.

      Reply
      1. JohnC

        As an example of this blinkered view. I put pertinent clinical details of a child I saw the other week on a closed Facebook group for Advanced Practitioners just to see what their responses would be. I asked them specifically for differential diagnoses for a 8 year old child with cough, slight temperature, sore throat and slightly tender neck ‘glands’. Most put Covid19 first, the child and family should isolate until they had a test. A few did mention a simple upper respiratory tract viral infection. It was the cough and the slight temperature that triggered the response, almost subliminally, with scant consideration given to more likely explanations including Epstein Barr Virus.
        EPV has quite a high prevalence in 2-10 year olds and 15-22 year olds, it’s symptoms mimic those of covid19 (but most viral infections do). The main differential between covid and other viral infections is the disappearance of the sense of taste. Is it a coincidence that a lot of primary schools are sending children home with ‘covid’ symptoms and not letting them back in until a negative test? Is it a coincidence that there is a mass imprisonment of students in Scotland with ‘covid’ symptoms? Is it a coincidence that these infections started to appear as soon as schools and universities returned in late August through September, particularly since EBV also appears in late August/September? With the increase in testing, the reduction in overall viral load and the associated increase in PCR testing, that can detect RNA for up to 90 days past any infection as well as picking up any random collection of nucleotides is it a coincidence that the number of positive tests is climbing? We should become like Belgium and stop reporting PCR results as cases, instead counting hospitalisations/deaths as the main metric.

        Reply
          1. JohnC

            My other concern is that the decision that a family should get tested is made by a person or organisation that is not clinically qualified to make what is effectively a medical diagnosis. This is based on one sign (temperature) and one symptom (cough).

        1. Gery

          Indeed………..but its like banging your head off a brick wall! The masses are well and truly brainwashed…….lost the ability to think for themselves.

          Reply
          1. Jerome Savage

            Are we in anthropology territory now ? Sit back and watch as a population respond to a highly effective fear manipulation and take notes.

  45. Gery

    The greatest and seriously terrifying concern regarding all of this, is the current totalitarian style government’s refusal to enter into any level of independent scientific / medical open debate / discussion (with media censorship at a monumental off the scale level); arrogantly refusing to respond correctly and appropriately to now numerous legal actions against them; as well as completely ignoring due democratic parliamentary process. For those of you here sharing these concerns, perhaps you would asap please sign and share this (even although it will probably also be ignored – but always worth the show of hands – so to speak):
    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/313310

    Reply
  46. elizabethhart

    A recent article reports Anders Tegnell’s response to increasing ‘cases’ in Sweden:[1]

    “The rolling average has increased somewhat,” Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist who devised its pandemic strategy, told a news conference.

    “It hasn’t affected the healthcare – yet. The number of new cases at ICU is very low and the number of deaths are very low,” he said.

    Tegnell said that new measures for the capital could not be ruled out. “We have a discussion with Stockholm about whether we need to introduce measures to reduce the spread of infection. Exactly what that will be, we will come back to in the next few days,” he said.

    I suggest this is something to watch carefully, to see if Sweden starts getting drawn into increasing constraints upon people, as is happening in the UK, and continuing in Victoria, Australia.

    Also notable that Swedish epidemiologist Johan Giesecke has now been promoted to a more senior role within the WHO, as Vice-Chair of the Strategic and Technical Advisory Group on Infectious hazards, which advises the Director-General on the response to pandemics.[2]

    Hmmmm…is the the Bill Gates dominated WHO reigning in more people to control the message and response…which appears to be favouring vaccines?

    References:
    1. Sweden says Stockholm measures possible as COVID cases rise. National Post, 22 September 2020.
    2. Johan Giesecke gets new role at WHO. UnHerd The Post, 1 September 2020.

    Reply
  47. AhNotepad

    The MSM is having to bend, maybe even having to change the narrative. A meeting at the Whitehouse with Trump’s advisor, Atlas, discussed the benefits, or otherwise of lockdowns. A video https://youtu.be/0Mr2ira9vJs interview of Martin Kulldorff of Harvard University by Tom Woods discusses.

    A search on “atlas faces media on lockdowns” gave an interesting list of links in the story https://duckduckgo.com/?q=atlas+faces+media+on+lockdowns&t=h_&ia=web. It may have changed if you search later.

    Reply
  48. Mark Heneghan

    Roughly 6000 positives tests daily at the moment and about 200 admissions to hospital daily. In March/April there were 3000 admissions daily. If we follow the same ratio then there were 15 x 6000 positive tests daily in March/April (had we been able to rest them) which was 90,000 a day or 2.7 million in a 30 day month. Maybe over the last 6 months about 10 million have actually had it?

    Reply
  49. Tish

    I’ve just spotted a rainbow but couldn’t bear to look at it. I’m bloody rainbowed out. There are certainly no pots of gold at the end of them!

    Reply
    1. Gery

      Aah……….never let THEM get to your humanity! The rainbow is beautiful and can be anything you want to make of it! So much beauty everywhere – try and see it even through these darkest times. Very challenging, I will agree!!! x

      Reply
  50. Howard

    Thanks for your site Malcolm. we need a
    #dontclickonC campaign to stop the data flow
    on news articles. If no one clicked on a C article and everyone cancelled their newspaper
    subscriptions the government and media would halt in their tracks.

    Reply
  51. JohnC

    I mentioned the possibility of EBV as an alternative and more probable diagnosis to SARS-CoV-2. EBV can manifest as glandular fever, particularly in the young adult, and is associated with students.
    However, there is one notable feature of glandular fever and that it has well known long term effects including fatigue.
    It is estimated that 95% of the population are colonised by EBV, which is a herpes family virus like chicken pox and the cold sore virus.
    Now I’m entering into speculation, but is it conceivable that either
    a) people with long CoViD19 were wrongly diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 in the first place and actually were EBV infected.
    or
    b) The stress of SARS-COV-2 infection triggered an outbreak of a dormant EBV.
    Thus long Covid is actually the manifestation of a different infection.

    Reply
    1. Terry Wright

      Hi JohnC; thanks very much for this very thoughtful and relevant comment: thoughtful is an exceedingly rare commodity these days: and you highlight the debilitation that many know so well; after contracting EBV.

      Colonisation also links into the work of Dr Hope-Simpson who highlighted that colonised herpes viruses are key to understanding shingles; and cold sores; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Edgar_Hope-Simpson

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC261759/

      and his wonderful work on influenza; seems to invite insights that the rapidity of respiratory viral waves; cannot be a case to case spread; instead with very low Vit D levels; that these viruses can erupt and arise from a dormant state in their host;

      chicken pox and shingles: “Only a great intellect could have conceived this possibility—that, remarkably, a virus could commonly lie dormant in the human body, for years, indeed decades, and then reappear in another form. Only an unusually determined researcher could have pursued the idea through fieldwork in the natural history tradition.”

      so thank you again for this very thoughtful comment; it gets ten times its value, as it comes from a practising clinician; aware of what I think Dr K would call the inherent and messy uncertainty of clinical medicine.

      Reply
  52. Gery

    Brilliant News Re Sat 26th Trafalgar Square from SORUK
    See link – great news from Louise re Westminster Council and even BETTER news is that the amazing medical Dr Heiko Schoning of the German Doctors Group (over 600 of them in the group) is flying in to speak!

    Reply
  53. JohnC

    I am seriously puzzled. It is said that at the peak some patients in ITU were exhibiting signs of hypoxaemia (low blood oxygen) with saturations at 50%, yet were not exhibiting signs of shortness of breath or hypoxia (lack of oxygen to the brain) as they were able to speak and were lucid. This means
    a) their brain was receiving enough oxygen to function fully
    b) their heart was receiving enough oxygen to function normally and fully (no abnormal rhythms)
    c) their other muscles were receiving sufficient oxygen to function normally.
    d) the feedback system for the respiratory system was functioning fully.

    Other than hoping that this wasn’t just dependent on a peripheral oxygen saturation probe but backed up by Arterial Blood Gases.
    From my limited understanding of physiology this is a puzzle, unless there’s an alternative means of generating or moving oxygen other than in the haemoglobin.

    Reply
    1. IMoz

      Surprisingly I was thinking about the same this morning, and the only thing I could think of is it must have something to do with how SpO2 is measured, one of the reason I can think of for that is hemoglobinopathy cheverly (there’s plenty of grand rounds cases), either innate or induced by the infection.

      This goes back to what I was saying since May(-ish): some scientists and doctors have patently forgotten everything they’ve been taught/trained for. On top of that you need to know when to trust diagnostic tools and when to trust your eyes: for some strange reason, with COVID-19, what normally would be considered an “abnormal result” of an investigation has become “that must be the cause,” let’s treat it—I wonder if any SaO2/PaO2 analysis was actually being done on any of those “low sats” patients before they were thrown under a mechanical ventilator bypassing bcpap/cpap…

      Reply
      1. JohnC

        Am I right in thinking that in hemoglobinopathy cheverly the absorption/emission of the blood is different to normal haemoglobin/oxyhaemoglobin/carboxyhaemoglobin? This would mean that the wavelengths of red light used in pulse oximeters would give a false low level of blood oxygen.
        However, I agree that if a person is sitting up, speaking, no cyanosis, no tachycardia, no tachypnoea, no bradycardia but with a saturations of 50% then it must be an instrumentation problem.
        I have heard stories of cardiac arrest calls going out because of alarms on monitors and the resus team arrives and talk to the patient, the nurse or HCA completely ignored the fact the patient was sitting up.
        Would an ABG show hemoglobinopathy cheverly ?

        Reply
        1. Steve-R

          It appears that, while only a very small proportion of cases have gone to autopsy (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7366094/ ) there are notable instances of occlusion of arteries including to the extremities including fingers with little or no pulse.
          If blood oxygen levels are measured by pulse oximetry then variability in measurement can be expected if occlusion is occurring.
          Might the low blood oxygen levels, rather than indicating systemic low oxygen, be an indication of impending occlusion of more critical arteries than those feeding the extremities.

          Reply
        2. Janet Love

          Early into New Yorks’ experience… a doctor was sent to intubate/ventilate a “low O- sat.” patient, complaining about difficulty in getting her to end her phone call… when the penny softly floated to earth !

          Reply
        3. IMoz

          ABG is a chemical composition analysis, it would tell you if the actual composition matches what is observed by other equipment, in this case a very primitive pulse oximeter. The problem with simple pulse oximetry vs ABG is that the latter requires experienced staff, more expensive equipment, and tight time scales (no more than 10 mins or so between drawing and analysis).

          Cheverly is a condition that requires a proper investigation and diagnosis (in some cases you might be left scratching your head until after the event, for example [1]). The point I was driving at is that when the results of an investigation are patently abnormal, you don’t stop and say “I’m going to trust what a tool tells me” instead of attempting to discover why the result is what it is (hint: in most cases, you’ve either reached a limitation or an edge-case of the tool).

          1. https://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/fulltext/2006/07000/unexpected_falsely_low_pulse_oximeter_measurements.65.aspx

          Reply
    2. Terry Wright

      Hi JohnC; folks have mused on this; I could try to find data on what one’s spO2 at the summit of Everest; breathing air is; suffice that it is low; and accepting that those there are fit and acclimatised; and hyperventilating; however venous blood returns to the lungs at perhaps 75% sat; at 20% sat, the partial pressure is still about 20mmHg http://ib.bioninja.com.au/_Media/adult-dissociation-curve_med.jpeg … what am I trying to say: maybe in the capillaries, that oxygen can still be extracted; even at low partial pressures ……. maybe we don’t need sats of 98%;

      over the last 50yrs, folks have learnt to accept lower haemoglobin values; so if a person loses blood by acute haemorrhage; folks have learnt that it can fall from 160gm/l to …. whatever is currently accepted by “consensus”: 80gm/l … 60gm/l ?? ……. ICUs have observations on what level of Hb folks die when very low: coming from respecting the wishes of JW who do not want to be transfused under any circumstances; many would suggest the value is slightly less than 20gm/l

      so in the way we have learnt with Hb; maybe the same lesson is there for arbitrary values of sats; certainly if one looks at children with various congenital heart conditions; before reparative surgery; they seem to function adequately (cerebrally) with what to others are very low sats.

      Similarly, a recent team exercise by Steve Bennett: cover 100 miles in 5 days; with zero calories; has gone very well: two T1 diabetics participated; all 8 on the team completed and many blood tests were done: they were fat-adapted; consumed no calories at all; https://primalliving.com/blogs/news/zero-calories-5-days-100-miles-challenge-steve-bennett

      so again, challenging what are assumptions; taught as though they were fact.

      Reply
      1. JohnC

        We were taught that the blood is a reservoir for the oxygen and must be above 95% to function fully, above 90% is reduced function and requires supplemental oxygen, except for COPD who depend on the hypoxic drive and extra oxygen would be fatal.
        Looking at some numbers:
        Inhaled air contains 20% oxygen
        Exhaled air contains 16% oxygen- which is sufficient for basic life support.
        Compressions only BLS also provides sufficient tidal flow for oxygenation.

        A sats of 100% suggests that (almost) every haemoglobin molecule has 4 oxygen molecules attached to it, but does it? Or is it there’s sufficient “redness” in the correct wavelengths for the sensor to indicate 100%? How is oxygenation measured in arterial blood?
        What does 50% sats mean? All haemoglobin molecules are carrying 2 oxygen molecules or 50% are carrying 4 molecules or somewhere between?
        At the cellular level, most of the cells in our body evolved from ancestors that developed in low oxygen level environments, typically 3%, i.e. very hypoxic. If these cells are exposed to higher oxygen levels they die. I assume that this one reason why transplant organs are kept in saline, to maintain a low oxygen environment.
        On a multicellular level we share ancestry with fish, who live in low oxygen environments.

        Reply
        1. Janet Love

          Nooooo Terry & Dr John, ! In the midst of a Deadly Pandemic is not the time to be challenging Sacred Dogmas – might put the spotlight on what may be Previous Mistakes, or worse, de-stabilise the Fear driven Story. And make it difficult for the next, novel, virus

          Reply
        2. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          This whole post written in the consciousness of quotas…

          I thought DMSO was used for transplant organs – at least when needed to be frozen.

          I don’t follow all of what you said – (always learning though) and yet I appreciate the gist of it as revealing fixed and erroneous ideas along with artefacts or errors arising from means and modes of measuring.

          Some interesting things came up from past reading on CO2. Some associated with Buteyko breathing – whose proponents suggest most of us habitually ‘normally’ over breathe and over oxygenate, which loses the reciprocal balance of CO2 and O as the underlying energy exchange of breathing.
          Levels have been a LOT higher in the ancient past, and associated with abundance of life on Earth.
          The naked mole rat partially seals its burrow system to maintain a similar ratio, and is the longest living rodent (? Citation needed) – which is I think around 70 years.
          Panic attacks are associated with over oxygenation and can be effectively treated by re-breathing into and from a paper bag.

          The other extreme is Wim Hoff – whose over oxygenation of rapid connected (no pause) breaths followed by a long no breath (minutes), looks to in some way reset the system – perhaps (IMO) mimicking a fight flight or intense exertion followed by deep and complete release. (Modern social mores do not tend to offer the release – just the stimulation).

          Another fact picked up via questioning the hypoxia (and covid stats) is that nicotine is known to offset hypoxia for altitude sickness. A fag could allay altitude sickness for 3 hrs or more.

          Smokers appear less – and heavy smokers least – in the critical illness or death stats for ‘with covid’ clinical statistics (in a similar statistical significance to obesity does as a negative factor). This might prompt Malcolm to strike me down 😉 but nicotinic acid is related and was renamed nicely to niacin was it not? And the biocidal chemical contaminants in mass produced cigarettes have – as far as I know – never been allowed significance in the demonisation of smoking – which in terms of prequels for covid, drilled the population to accept medical state mandate for a cherry picked wedge that set legal and behavioural precedent for anything else designated public harm, that serves a state (or PPP) agenda. (Public Private Partnership).

          Breathing is directly part of the emotional being which is the quality of a felt connectedness with life or indeed the distress or fear of loss. I cannot spell out the how, but I sense this quality of connection as a field of communication in which the whole body, right down to the cells, is pervaded or supported by. My sense is that this sense of disconnect become normalised as our ‘mind’ of the attempt to compensate or control over a sense of apartness.
          One of the positive qualities of health is a felt and present sense of connectedness in life – regardless any symptoms – which contrasts with a sense of being defined, locked down, besieged or driven by symptoms of pain or dysfunction.

          Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      IMoz, I wonder what they would have seen if they also looked at the multiple use of single use masks. Which appears to be what mot people do. Then there’s the removing any mask, shoving it in a pocket or a handbag, along with the handkerchief or old tissue that’s in there.

      Reply
      1. shirley3349

        I suspect most people only wear a mask to avoid hassle in public places and take it off as soon as they can. They know that a mask has little or no effect against viruses. Changing them frequently is just another expense to be avoided in hard times.

        Reply
      2. IMoz

        I suspect there will be plenty of governments, wealthy individuals, and international organisations that will pay to *not* have that research done! 😉

        Reply
  54. Jennifer

    Dr Kendrick. Many responses to your informative blog are becoming quite tedious these days. It is a shame to see such deterioration due to countless, obscure links. I have some time on my hands, but not sufficient to waste on wading through some of the guff. Sorry.

    Reply
    1. Mr Chris

      Jennifer
      I agree. Wading through réplétive guff takes a lot of time
      People, keep it snappy. See I typed réplétive instead of repetitive
      It makes the same sense

      Reply
        1. Mr Chris

          Malcolm
          Just moderating is quite a job. I think my appeal is to people who comment, to their sense of responsabilités. Your appeal to limit stuff to three short posts or one long one fell on deaf ears.

          Reply
          1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

            I am going to impose it with greater force. Especially as I am now suffering a D&V bug that is draining my energy levels.

            So. One long post, or three short ones, per day is now the official limit. Please, do not make the long post five thousand words long.

    2. Jerome Savage

      Jennifer – it may not be prose but to me some of the technical stuff can be fascinating. But it can be difficult to read everything.

      Reply
  55. Rosie

    Dr Heiko Schoning (one of now over a thousand worldwide doctors group) was arrested in Hyde Park, London yesterday afternoon whilst speaking out about this governments narrative on so called ‘CV 19’. Was still being held by police as of first thing this morning. Shocking.

    Reply
    1. Jennifer

      Rosie, and anyone still reading my responses (!).
      Hands up those fearful of Covid19.
      Hands up those fearful of the State.
      They’re doing an even better job now, wouldn’t you say? Or am I just a wimp?

      Reply
  56. Sylvia Brooke

    Dr. Kendrick,
    I am so sorry that you are not well, although it doesn’t surprise me with some of the hassle that you receive on your blog. I would have blown a gasket a long time ago. I just want to say Get Well Soon, and a big thank you for all that you do, it is so much appreciated by so many people.
    Sylvia Brooke.

    Reply
    1. Tish

      Yes, poor you Malcolm. My little granddaughter has it but of course a CPR test said Covid!!
      My sister and brother-in-law got a nasty attack of diarrhoea and sickness in February.
      Sleep well!

      Reply
    2. Studs Ramrod

      From Dr. Kendrick in a previous thread.

      “Don’t let a few down ticks put you off. If you don’t get attacked, you aren’t doing it right. If everyone agree with everything I wrote, I would have to go off and have a think about what I was doing wrong.”

      Hope you’re better soon Dr. Kendrick

      Reply
  57. The Dim Appear

    Dominic Raab was on Sky News recently talking to Kay Burley and said that only 7% of positive test results for COVID are accurate i.e. they have COVID, which I am assuming means that 93% are false positives. I don’t know how he can arrive at the 7% figure when he says the tests aren’t accurate, but who knows anything any more.

    If this is correct and you strip out from the stats people who sadly died with COVID, where the test was accurate, how many people actually died with COVID as the cause?

    How many of the thousands of new cases they are reporting every day are really COVID positives?

    Reply
  58. Tish

    I wonder if this might be helpful to anyone who gets the gastrointestinal thing and can’t eat for a while:

    Despite wanting to avoid excess sugar, I find a bit of honey good when I have a tummy bug because it hardly needs any digestion and provides energy quickly.

    Reply
  59. Jeremy May

    Sympathies Doc, get well soon.
    But at least you aren’t suffering from V D & V (Verbal…) like one or two others.
    (That is very much tongue in cheek because the wider discussion is fascinating if we have both time and capability to understand it.)

    Simply, despite 5000 ‘cases’ there were only 17 covid’ deaths yesterday for which the nation is in fear and straightjacket.

    Reply
        1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

          Well I could say a bit more… 😉
          Can an old elephant learn new tricks?
          That is, can we recognise habits or conditioning and reclaim the capacity to bring ourselves present, as a new choice, rather than act out from a past framing running AS IF present?

          The theory of this is not too hard to grasp, but the practice of such a willingness is demanding of really turning up – when everything in your current state wants anything else.
          Fighting against old habits can seem to work in the short term, but actually feeds the underlying fear or conflict by setting more layers of strategy over it – not unlike symptom suppression.
          Uncovering who you really are/what you truly want, is the freedom to align positively in what you are, rather than identify against what you fear to be. This can be ‘leaning’ or a persistent incremental shift. The key is not changing the world to fit some predetermined or problem framed outcome, but changing our mind about the world so as to see it from a perspective that is not defined from the mindset of the problem. And the ‘problem’ is in this sense ‘problem’ is derived from the ‘elephant log’ of formative adaptation to core sense of self and world.
          But no one wants to go there – the mind is predicated on ensuring you never have to go there again. So much so as to operate an amnesia that actively protects against re-opening curiosity.
          ‘Hey Doc – can you just make the bad stuff go away!’

          Reply
      1. Eric

        Almost an hour’s worth of monologue from a glorified ambulance chaser out to make big money? Come on!

        Yes, infections or positives are not necessarily cases, but why are they suddenly rising when Covid was supposedly over in Stockholm?

        A certain percentage of those positives ends up in ICU, by which time they clearly constitute cases. If you want to close your eyes to this, fine, but don’t belittle and ridicule other people who actually follow what data are out there.

        Reply
          1. Binra (@onemindinmany)

            Anyone with a capacity to educate themselves, can recognise the tell-tale signs of a provocation to disinfo and division – presenting as a plausible ignorance and baiting diversion – While anyone who doubts their own educative faculty at the slightest hint of being told they are wrong – can use such commenters to reinforce doubt and division in their thinking, so as to prevent consciousness from actually integrating to the fact or currency of the situation.

            So disinfo agents offer an education in responsibility for our own consciousness – if you so desire. They also offer a narrative shenanigans to tangle energy and attention in – if we are so baited to engage.

            Just as mainstream news (sic) can be read as both a sales pitch and a legal document, so can the use of weaponised posts be seen as smear under plausible deniability.

            The response to the denial of consciousness as human right to create the conditions for life, is to reclaim what is in effect signed away to falsely framed thinking.
            Appeal to humanity will have no reception on those who take profit and delight in ‘nudging’ and baiting their target to react – and by reaction, take on some part of a negative payload.

            I am led to believe an army (literally army combatants) is in process of training and engagement as agents of disinformation to unleash upon the enemies of a captured state dictate.

            If such a one must ‘save themselves’ and their family by such means then perhaps they can learn to take the profit while going through the motions of seeming to tick the boxes under plausible deniability. What we give unto Caesar should never be what is truly due unto the heart of life – or we brutalise ourselves against any capacity of feeling life, while believing we are being forced to do it or worse groomed to believe we are special – and will be specially rewarded.

            Anyone can apologise or retract smear, ad hom and other framing tricks, to resume any genuine interest from a point that honours communication, rather than frames it to shut it down or divert to nowhere.

            Invested narratives operate as if alive or real, but have only the life given them, by those who are susceptible to replicating them as their own masking strategy. It might be noted that the capturing of our institutions is a symptom of the extreme disproportionate distribution of wealth as financial leveraging of a top down dictate – presented under all kinds of plausible fronts – but only under the persistent denial of Consciousness by fear, by guilting, by conflict and by strain of exhaustion.

            I cant seem to buy Dr Tom Cowan’s new book. Big book burning at Amazon and all the others. Regardless the pretext, the precedent is but the thin end of a wedge. If we do not join in holding for the conditions for life, we either wont have them, or may not recognise life or ourselves in what persists.

        1. AhNotepad

          Eric, you wrote:
          ”Almost an hour’s worth of monologue from a glorified ambulance chaser out to make big money?”

          Were you asking a question about something suggested by someone else? Were you making a statement? “glorified ambulance chaser” is at the level of “covid denier” or “climate change denier” which indicates whoever said it has a weak case, so has to resort to ridicule.

          Reply
          1. Eric

            Well, first of all, I have no patience to listen to him for that amount of time, the first three minutes were enough, thank you.

            Secondly, we all know that American tort law is a circus, and while class action may be a valuable tool for groups of people to get some compensation, it is the lawyers who profit most.

            Thirdly, he is not a scientist, and any expert input that he may have sought will be carefully rendered to support only the story he is trying to advance.

            So even if I had the patience to sit through this, I would take any statements from him with a large lump of salt.

          2. AhNotepad

            Fortunately for you it is not mandatory that you should listen to anything you don’t want to. I trust your fit of pique will subside soon so your stress level does not require you seek Malcolm’s advice on CVD onset. 😉

    1. AhNotepad

      Do not mistake positive test results for cases or infections. For infections you have to show symptoms, same as for cases.

      Reply
  60. Eric

    First of all, false positives are completely negligable if dual target testing is performed, either right away or after finding a postive on the first target. Whether the postives are really sick is another debate, but:
    – we shouldn’t be seeing these numbers if most people were really immune in Stockholm
    – as elsewhere, ICU admissions are creeping up not long after the positives go up:
    https://www.thelocal.se/20201002/covid-19-cases-in-intensive-care-are-rising-again-in-sweden

    Reply
    1. Gery

      I repeat…….infections of WHAT???? Suggest you listen to lucid easy to understand statement in link I posted above. If that doesn’t help clarify things for you, then in all likelihood you are beyond help.

      Reply
  61. AhNotepad

    oops, moderation overload. This looks like nothing more than an advert. Parabriz, go away and play somewhere trivial.

    Reply
  62. redsnapperimagesgmailcom

    I’m reading many conflicting numbers for the IFR of CV19. Is there any broad agreement on the IFR per population of different countries and also the IFR across age bands? Regards Anthony Tough

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s