Matt Hancock ‘I tried’

16th June 2021

This article first appeared in RT.com https://www.rt.com/op-ed/526539-catastrophic-care-homes-matt-hancock/

As a GP working mainly with elderly patients in Care Homes and Intermediate Care I witnessed, at first hand, the absolute disaster that was the Government policy at the start of the COVID19 outbreak. Elderly patients who were COVID19 positive, or not tested, perhaps even negative, were simply shovelled out of hospitals and into care homes. ‘The hospitals must be cleared out… nothing else matters.

At the time there was no personal protection equipment (PPE) available… at all. In fact, in many care homes staff were actually ordered by the management not to wear PPE. This was also the case in hospitals. Not that it would have made a great deal of difference in most care homes where patients with dementia often wander happily from room-to-room without masks, and oblivious to any potential danger. I had to usher one or two out of the nurse’s office from time to time.

In my work with Intermediate Care patients, looking after those who were too well to be in an acute hospital bed, but not yet well enough to be at home, we were placed under massive pressure to just send everyone home. That is if they were COVID19 positive, or not, or untested, where they could spread it to their – often elderly – relatives. Alternatively, they could infect their carers who would then travel to the homes of other elderly people they were looking after, without PPE.

In fact, if you wanted to design a system of ensuring that every single, vulnerable person in the country gained full exposure to COVID19, you could not have a done a better job. I wrote several increasingly frustrated e-mails to various managers, but they simply stated they were just following policy so ‘you can’t blame me’. Policy set at the very top.

Here is an example of the type of e-mail I was sending in April 2020. You may sense the frustration (I have changed the names of the unit and wards for confidentiality reasons).

I think this is very simple, Unit A is currently ‘hot’. We have five patients and four staff ‘COVID positive’ swabbed. Eight patients have now died of COVID.

If we admit COVID negative patients into Unit A this is putting them at great risk of being infected. So, we should stop admissions. The only ones that should come in are those found positive, recovered, and 14 days post positive swab – at least.

Equally if we discharge patients, we are, almost certainly, spreading COVID around the entire care community. Until fourteen days have passed.

There is also a plan to send COVID positive patients to ward B, and keep Unit A as green (no COVID). The only way Unit A can be green is if we stop admitting patients. Because, once new patients reach Unit A they are likely to get infected, then another 14 – 21 days must pass. So, we will go round and round, forever.

Also, another plan is to send high risk staff to Unit A, and have low risk staff in ward B, so the staff will be swapped around. Again, Unit A is currently red hot. We will be endangering high risk staff if we send them to Unit A. Some of them will get infected. Then, they will incubate for 7 – 14 days. They will infect patients, and other staff, then they will go off sick. Then, some of them may well die.

The current plan seems to be to admit elderly vulnerable patients into a high risk COVID ‘hot’ environment and hope they don’t get COVID. We have already seen staff to patient transmission in Unit A. So, some of these patients will get infected, with a very high risk of dying….

In a way, it is hard to blame management who were trying to follow ever-changing edicts from above. Edicts often directly contradicting what they had been told the day before. It was chaos. Now, we have Matt Hancock, the UK Health Secretary stating, amazingly without being struck down by a lightning bolt, that he threw a ring of steel around care homes and elderly hospital units at the time. A… ring… of… steel. This was presumably to stop anyone escaping somewhere safer. Of course, he now says that the most important word in his statement is ‘tried’ as in ‘We tried to throw a ring of steel…’

This will now be his perfect defence. I didn’t say we succeeded, I only said that we tried. How completely pathetic. First, he did the exact opposite of trying. He put in place policies that were directly responsible for the massive number of deaths in care homes. He commanded that hospital were emptied out of elderly patients. What’s his next excuse. ‘Lots of the other countries did the same thing.’ Which is true. But you can hardly claim you are a leader, if all you managed to do was follow others down a disastrous policy failure.

How many deaths did this cause? Well, during the first wave of COVID19 it has been estimated that forty per cent of deaths occurred in care homes. Here from the Nuffield trust:

‘…the burden of the virus fell much more severely on care homes (relative to the population generally) in the first wave. Of the 48,213 COVID deaths registered between mid-March and mid-June, 40% were care home residents.’ https://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/news-item/COVID-19-and-the-deaths-of-care-home-residents

There are around half a million residents in care homes, which is nought point seven per-cent (0.7%) of the entire population. Yet they had forty per cent (40%) of the deaths.

Yes, the elderly, especially those in care homes were most likely to die from COVID19. But this was known very early on. In Italy, where COVID19 first hit Europe, the average age of death was eighty two, and almost all of those who died had other, significant diseases.

If there was one population that needed to be protected it was elderly, vulnerable care home residents. Matt Hancock presided over policy decisions that threw care home residents under a bus. Now he is trying to claim he did all he could to protect them. Anyone who works in the health service, or in the care sector, knows exactly what he did.

334 thoughts on “Matt Hancock ‘I tried’

  1. Barry Maddison

    The week before lockdown I was on a holiday with my elder brother, who was 64 at the time. I remember commenting on him being in the vulnerable group. If I knew all this before lockdown then govt ministers knew it much earlier. You don’t even have to be a health worker to know it. How do they get away with it?

    Reply
  2. Peter Ford

    It was obvious at the time to anybody with half a brain that a holocaust was being brewed in care homes. Thanks, Malcolm, for adding to the pressure on Hancock to resign.

    Reply
      1. Rosie

        That would certainly be a day to celebrate. These psychopathec criminals , Hancock, Johnson, Witty, Vallance, Ferguson et all ALL KNOW EXACTLY what they have been and are doing. They should be locked away in high security institutions and the keys incinerated. They are blatant heartless genocidal murderers

        Reply
    1. Rose Zingleman

      Leftist academics (Peter Singer at Princeton is one—but he takes care of his own mother) and people like Bill Gates who have eugenicist backgrounds and openly advocate for “death panels” to stop “wasting resources on non-producers.” Covid appears to be tailor made for their favorite cause. I think we are being acclimated to thinking in terms of “who deserves care.” Ireland’s John Waters has recently written about this in the context of euthanasia. If the elderly have family around there will be pushback against dispatching the old and “useless.” Good doctors like our host were as overwhelmed by rules and diktats as they were illness. How many died alone? Such efficiency to use a virus. This year made me a total cynic.

      Reply
      1. Prudence Kitten

        We often hear fine talk about “Western values”. But any talk about “useless mouths” or “non-producers” is absolutely and directly contrary to those values.

        Every individual human life is held to be sacred and of inestimable value. It’s not because they are “useful” or “productive”, but because they are human.

        Besides, what does it mean to be “useful” or “productive”? The retired, living on pensions or savings, are consuming credits given to them in recognition of work they did during their working lives. How is the pension of an 80-year-old any less deserved than Bill Gates’s $80 billion (minimum)? (Incidentally, Gates boasts of having paid over $6 billion in tax – about 7.5% of what he has saved!)

        The “value” – if you insist on thinking in such crude terms – of a human life can be assessed in various dimensions. How many family, friends, colleagues, students and others look up to the person, learn from her and get inspiration from her? Freed from the constraints and limitations of employment, many people only really get started on the work they want to do after retirement.

        I consider Bill Gates a “useless mouth”, and what’s worse a “dangerous mouth”. No great shakes as a programmer or software designer, the man is a classic American salesman, empire-builder and “robber baron”. He follows directly in the tradition of the Astors, Vanderbilts, Morgans, Rockefellers and other great pirates.

        Reply
        1. Prudence Kitten

          A propos Bill Gates, I am reminded of the following pungent words from Gustavus Myers’ brilliant book, “History of the Great American Fortunes” (strongly recommended).

          “Through all of these pages have we searched afar with infinitesimal scrutiny for a fortune acquired by honest means. Nor have the methods been measured by the test of a code of advanced ethics, but solely by the laws as they stood in the respective times. At no time has the discovery of an ‘honest fortune’ rewarded our determined quest. Often we thought that we had come across such a specimen, only to find distressing disappointment; through all fortunes, large and small, runs the same heavy streak of fraud and theft, the little trader, with his misrepresentation and swindling, differing from the great frauds in degree only”.

          Reply
          1. Gary Ogden

            Prudence Kitten: Whitney Webb has a book coming out soon about the long-standing relationship between Bill Gates and Jeffrey Epstein. An honest fortune, indeed.

      2. mmec7

        How Scientists Are Used as Pawns to Shape Public Opinion
        https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2021/06/28/pandemic-virus-industrial-complex.aspx?

        Mercola draws the tattered edges together to make the whole insidious cauldron of seething politico/PR/skewed science and total corruption, plain to be seen. True science and open scientific discussion bears no resemblance to these factors stripped of their wrappings. As shown here, one is dealing with pure evil – evil of intent, evil of devastating capability undertaken by men and organisations with deliberate evil intent, based on power forces and finance.

        Reply
  3. S Osborn

    What you say is absolutely correct. My partner (who had dementia) was in hospital (in London) in March 2020. He was really ill and was given last stage medication (we were not told) and released back into the care home. We wondered why on earth he was not tested for covid before being released. Matt Hancock a leader? He is iniquitous and self seeking…I won’t go on.

    Reply
  4. HotScot

    Malcolm,

    first, everyone should thank you for the efforts you made and are making to rectify this horrific situation.

    Second, I understand Hancock, Witty, Vallance and Ferguson have all been served notice of an intended PCP (Personal Criminal Prosecution) by the notably successful Michael O’Bernicia for crimes against humanity as defined in the Nuremberg Code.

    I also understand the noted Lawer Dr. Reiner Fuellmich has raised a prosecution in a Canadian court against, amongst others, The Pope, The Queen, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for similar.

    There has been much debate about ‘Q’ issuing proclamations that ‘The best is yet to come’ something I dismissed as an urbane myth at best, and a left-wing psyop at worst.

    I’m now beginning to wonder as these events begin to unfold if this could be the thread by which the jumper is unravelled.

    Reply
    1. Mike Coker

      The Queen? The Pope? How not to get people onside. How to create serious hostility from lots and lots of people.
      Bill gates, Matt Hancockup etc There are lots of targets out there who need to answer for their actions

      Reply
      1. HotScot

        If the Queen and the Pope represent part of this they deserve to be prosecuted. However, they are named as heads of institutions, including the Commonwealth which Canada is part of.

        You can read the indictment here.

        Click to access Lawsuit.pdf

        Reply
        1. theasdgamer

          Maybe one of the aims of naming the heads of institutions is to be able to compel those institutions to release evidence–discovery is what it is called in the US.

          Reply
        2. JohnC

          Actually our Queen is also the Queen of Canada, it’s nothing to do with the commonwealth, the head of which doesn’t have to be the monarch.

          Reply
    2. Ken Garoo

      “There has been much debate about ‘Q’ issuing proclamations that ‘The best is yet to come’ something I dismissed as an urbane myth at best, and a left-wing psyop at worst.”

      The people ultimately responsible are neither left nor right; they are war, power, and money. The left/right thing is exploited as a classic divide and conquer, as is ‘identity politics’, etc.

      Reply
  5. Jeanie

    It just doesent stop does it.no one will hold their hands up and say do you know what I made a massive “fek up” but I could only go on the advice given at the time and admit now it was all very badly handled.
    I for one would think more of them if they did this.
    I’m actually meeting more and more people now who are raising doubts and questioning more and its like a breath of fresh air and a pleasant change for me from being hounded for failing to comply with “the rules”.
    One of my grandchildren had a chest infection last week none of the services would even consider seeing her unless she had a covid test at 2 years old,her mum phoned the surgery and other services over 80 times to try and get her seen we told her to either phone an ambulance or just turn up and a & e which she ended up doing.They were all more focused to the point of obsession about why she’d refused to put her baby through the ordeal of testing when she was already unable to breath,as far as I’m concerned she acted very wisely.our health service is falling apart and no one is being made answerable for it.You must just wring your hands in despair at all these things you see day in day out.Thank you again for taking the time to educate us with all these going ons.

    Reply
      1. Ken Garoo

        “Mistakes were made. Lessons have been learnt. It is time to move on.” – Every politico with blood on their hands.

        Reply
  6. Christine

    Thank you Dr Kendrick. Some wonderful honesty and first hand experience being broadcast. I love this post. Of course we all know Matt Hancock for his lies and deceit. Time he went- the man can no longer tell the difference between truth and lies. Thank you for all your wonderful work. Please take care.

    Reply
    1. AhNotepad

      Christine, Hancock is a serial promiser. He never delivers, and has never told the truth. He has a biography on sheepfarm.co.uk which gives some background.

      Reply
    1. Mike C

      My understanding is that surgical masks (for example – other PPE is often used as well) would be effective in a personal care or health provision setting where a care giver may well be getting up close and personal with an elderly patient. However, the scraps of plastic felt you can now buy in supermarkets are not surgical masks (you don’t see the NHS buying them from Aldi) and it’s never been usual to get so close to someone in a shop that you can wipe their saliva off their chin (again, just for an example).

      Reply
      1. theasdgamer

        Surgical masks are useless to prevent aerosol infection. They do function well as a barrier against patient body fluids, where you can change them out after a fluid eruption from the patient.

        I don’t see N95 masks having much benefit against viral aerosols, either.

        Reply
    2. lingulella

      As Dr Kendrick noted back when this all kicked off, the commissioning health board refused to allow him HCQ. If used prophylactically with other commonly available medicines, e.g. steroids etc there would have been no need of PPE except to protect against comorbidities such as bacterial pneumonia.

      Reply
      1. Harry de Boer

        Withholding proper medical treatment from a patient in dire need is a serious crime. I hope they will be tried for that. EVERY SINGLE ONE!

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    3. Marianne

      My question exactly: masks are useless against any virus. And PPE have been proven to be useless also. But why send people with active cases of any virus whether it be corona, or flu, or whatever into places where people are well, particularly care homes where residents have lowered immunity by virtue of their age?

      Reply
  7. Malcolm Hite

    Hancock along with sage have been lying to the public Ferguson and blair have been implicit in this as well boris is a dithering puppet and has complied
    In America they are now holding fauvism to account for his actions in shutting down America and lying to the government and people
    This needs to happen here with the above mentioned people. They should be charged with crimes against humanity

    Reply
  8. Bev Davis

    From July 2019 to June 2020 following a stroke, my brother and I cared for our mother at home 24\7 with help from carers. She was adamant about not going in a care home. This was a huge disruption to our lives but she was our mother.
    My sister-in-law worked in a Care home and during the early stages of the ‘pandemic’ had a particular resident returned back from hospital seriously ill with a respiratory illness whom she had cared for on her shift. My brother was very concerned it was covid and of the high possibility of cross infecting our mother via his partner. I rang the care home to try and ascertain the covid status of the patient whom I was told had been returned to hospital. The manager would not confirm\deny covid despite the concerns for our mother. I actually argued with my brother and said it was beyond all comprehension that patients with covid would be sent back to nursing homes. It just would not happen. More fool me for ever believing Matt Hancock’s rhetoric.
    Mum never caught covid but she had another stroke and died in June 2020. She never really knew about covid, we shielded her from both the virus and the unrelenting media fear. I’m glad she died remembering the world as it used to be and didn’t spend her last few months worrying for the future of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

    Reply
  9. lotus604

    Sorry to get off the subject, but did you see the story in the Daily Mirror that people on Statins are twice as likely to get Alzheimer’s than those not taking them

    Reply
    1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

      Ah yes, ‘but the benefits are still far greater than any possible downsides’. Beep, message ends…. after you have finished listening to this recording you can hang up, bugger off, and keep on taking your statins.

      Reply
        1. ShirkeyKate

          Lotus, if they insist on making you sign that form you could accept the prescription but not actually swallow the pills. They won’t force them down your throat. It would lead to waste in the NHS which I deplore, but at least you’d have a quiet life.

          Reply
          1. lotus604

            I read that it costs NHS £4000 per year per person to provide these statins. With the amount of pressure they put on people to take them I’m wondering if they get some huge bonus from the Big Pharma . Thanks for your reply Kate

          2. ShirleyKate

            Lotus, if it costs that much then better not get the prescriptions filled, but obviously do not take the statins. Also I believe GP practices get money from the government (not pharma) if they get a certain percentage of what are considered to be eligible patients to take statins. And incidentally isn’t it nice to be discussing other stuff rather than the never-ending Covid 19?

      1. Tarl

        Apropos of statins, a study claimed that “The use of statins was significantly associated with a reduced need for IMV and decreased mortality among individuals with COVID-19.”

        https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34096808/

        Why would this be true, if it is true? Covid hijacks and disrupts mitochondrial function. You would expect the counter to this would be something that boosts mitochondrial function (CoQ10, carnitine, NAC, vitamin E, don’t smoke, don’t be fat, etc.) The worst thing to do would be to take something that impairs mitochondrial function. – like statins. Indeed, one wonders whether Covid hits the elderly particularly hard precisely *because* so many of them are on statins…

        Reply
        1. Martin Back

          Most older people are prescribed statins these days, but lots of people stop taking statins because they don’t like the side effects, so I assume a high proportion of the non-statin sample were actually people who had taken statins but stopped.
          For those on high-dose statins:
          – 16% have stopped after one year
          – 28% have stopped after six years
          For those on low-dose statins
          – 43% have stopped after one year
          – 52 % have stopped after six years
          https://www.bhf.org.uk/for-professionals/healthcare-professionals/blog/statins-10-facts-you-might-not-know

          I offer two suggested explanations why statins might decrease Covid mortality::
          1. Those who stopped statins do not have particularly robust constitutions, that’s why the statins affected them badly, and because of their less robust constitutions they are also less resistant to Covid-19.
          2. Those who keep taking statins are the type who take everything the doctor prescribes and are probably on many other medications as well. The other medications might be protective against Covid-19, not the statins. Also, they probably seek treatment earlier than the first types.

          (Of course, if statins kill you, then the non-statin group will be older than the statin group and thus more vulnerable to Covid, but I assume the results are age-adjusted.)

          Reply
        2. Janet love

          Someone somewhere praised NAC as ‘useful’ in the treatment of covid…. Then within a shrt time of publishing…. the (USA) FDA effectively banned the supplement…. Pure co-incidence.

          Reply
          1. Junkgirl

            You can still buy NAC. Just not on Amazon. I just got it on another site that sells supplements. It’s selling fast so supplies may be low and with the supply lines of so many things cracking now not getting it may just down to that.

      2. Donna Black

        First it is “you can’t do this, that or the other unless you’ve had the jab.” Next it will be “you can’t do this, that or the other unless you take your statins/antidepressants/etc.” If they enforce this jab we’re on a very slippery slope.

        Reply
        1. lingulella

          There are reports of three stateside airlines deciding not to take the risk of vaccinated passengers disrupting flights due to DVT as a result of platelet/clotting issues.
          No idea if it is true, probably not, but if it becomes an issue then why should they not ban them?

          Reply
          1. Janet Love

            Speaking of airlines…. confirmed that BA had 4 PILOTS pass away in a Very Short Interval. All were recently jabbed. Only autopsy I can recall was of one who fell off his bicycle, and an abdominal bleed did him in, related to a “co-incidental” blood disorder possibly associated with the jab….

        2. Harry de Boer

          And the ultimate goal is your social credit score card refusing you entry in the bus, train or plane terminal for spreading ‘fake news’ about covid, or criticizing your government.
          Or for whatever reason as the A.I. in control won’t tell you. Doesn’t have to because it belongs to a private company.
          And governments will be superfluous. Only the army will stay to incarcerate you if this makes you angry, and they are controlled by the… banks.

          Reply
      3. Harry de Boer

        That same message is now used for the ‘vaccines’ (experimental gene therapy, except maybe Sputnik V).

        Reply
      4. PAUL BLACK

        Thanks to you I stopped taking statins months ago. Am hoping the few years I was on them doesn’t have adverse long term effects.

        Reply
      5. Craig E

        I found it interisting that a statin is included in one of the treatment protocols (cant remember which one) for Covid-19. It seemed to be the only drug in the protocol that didnt make sense….unless it’s for its anti inflammatory properties?

        Reply
    2. Marlene E JENKIN

      The brain needs cholesterol so why block it ? NHS website ? mentions correcting thyroid status BEFORE starting statins. However as the NHS testing for thyroid is a disgrace and most people are declared ‘normal’. It is LOW in range T3 that can be involved in raised cholesterol and yet is VERY rarely tested in the NHS. Of course undiagnosed and under-treated thyroid patients are lucrative for Big Pharma. We must read and learn to advocate for ourselves with the help of those who direct us down rewarding paths. Thank you Dr K ….

      Reply
        1. Gary Ogden

          JDPatten: And thank goodness it does, or we’d all be brain-dead like the folks in Washington, D.C.

          Reply
          1. Jean Humphreys

            Ok so the brain makes its own cholesterol – but that doesn’t keep up with the statin stripping it out. It is not a pleasant feeling when that is happening – says she who knows what it is like.

          2. Gary Ogden

            Jean Humphreys: I’m not certain this is true (that statins inhibit cholesterol production in the brain, as they do in the liver). I’ve been searching “The Great Cholesterol Con,” but haven’t yet found a definitive answer.

          3. Jean Humphreys

            You want a definitive answer – here you are. After the second round of open heart surgery, they allowed me to have a statin – much relief, since the alternative cholesterol reducer was unpleasant. Two years on, and the mucle pain and weakness had incrased till I said “Enough” and to the Doctor he could take them for me.
            In parallel, I was getting increasingly concerned about my mental health – I pur it down to damage coming off the by-pass machine, as I had been warned. I could no longer do even the simple crossword, and kept getting worrying “What am I here for?” moments, and lost words, which would return a day too late for the conversation. After some time I realised that problem had gone away, and now I am as sharp (OH sometimes says “too sharp”) as I always used to be. And it was not damage from the op. A couple of weeks after the second op, Mr physician said to his firm, “Mrs. H can go home tomorrow – unless she has a relapse, and fails to finish the crossword.”
            I do a cryptic one every day, as part of my monitoring process.

          4. Gary Ogden

            Jean Humphreys: I love crossword puzzles, too, especially the ones in the newspaper! But the rest of the newspaper is rubbish, so I now get really good ones from another source. I was fortunate to have discovered, in this order, Dr, Ravnskov, Dr. Graveline, and Dr. Kendrick before my doctor ever mentioned statins, so I remain relatively undamaged. A bit unhinged, but pharmaceutical-free five years now, and a picture of health.

          5. Eggs ‘n beer

            Or, you could take up chess. Excellent mental stimulation, every game is unique and you can play as often as you like. I’ve started playing blitz chess, each player has five minutes on the clock, so the maximum time per game is ten minutes (very satisfying winning a game when your opponent times out and you have 0.7 seconds left), you can have one minute games, and I’m being forced to learn openings and defences to improve my game. chess.com is the site. It doesn’t matter how bad you are, you’re only paired with similar level players. As your rating changes so do the ratings of your opponents.

    3. me oliveira

      In 1960 I started my medical school. I’m a MD. Only in the 1980’s I began seeing people with Alzheimer disease. The same time that statins went to rush the markets.

      Reply
  10. gillpurple

    Thank you for your continued work on this, Malcolm. This government have demonstrated a remarkable ability to ignore/blank out/fail to consider and protect anyone who is vulnerable and/or elderly. They were warned about serious risks to care home residents and other vulnerable elderly people but they seem to consider this section of the population expendable. I find Matt Hancocks response to this issue concerning – his strategy (along with some of his colleagues in cabinet) seems to be redefining reality. Crazy making stuff. As you say those in the health service and care sector know exactly what happened but I am not confident that Matt Hancock (or any of his colleagues) will be properly held to account anytime soon.

    Reply
  11. andy

    It’s not about the flu any more is it. It’s about the absolute control of each other, under false pretence of caring about our health.

    Reply
    1. Bev Davis

      It never was.
      I’m just grateful for Doctors like Malcolm and others in various professions trying to cut through all the bs. Unfortunately they are few and far between and as mum used to say, “there is no one deafer than those who don’t want to hear.”

      Reply
      1. abamji

        You might like my blog at https://bamjiinrye.wordpress.com.

        The critics of the science have a lot to work with. However it might be unfair to blame the politicians for following the advice they were given. It is however very fair to blame them continuing to follow it when much of it is obviously wrong, and much of the rest based on unreasonable manipulation of statistics. There’s a very good takedown of Whitty’s last presentation on the Lockdown Sceptics website.

        Reply
        1. theasdgamer

          You can blame the politicians for not getting a wider range of medical opinion–from gp’s for example.

          I have found internists and ed docs who have said that they have tried HCQ on covid patients and found that it doesn’t work (because they see patients late rather than early), but I have yet to find a single gp who says that.

          Somebody find a black swan.

          Dr. Brian Tyson and his crew have treated over 5,000 patients for covid (mostly hispanic at the El Centro Clinic) without a single loss and only one hospitalization. They use antivirals and aggressive followup. Zelenko, Procter, Gold, Emmanuel all report excellent results when using antivirals with high risk patients. Even McCullough, who is a cardiologist, reports good results (and his patients are _all_ high risk). I believe that McCullough published a protocol in AJM.

          But the medical community is prejudiced against gp’s, who do actually care about their patients, so they don’t recommend gp’s to politicians for medical advice.

          Now cue the “There are no RCTs to support antivirals” song and dance.

          Reply
        2. Bev Davis

          I read the Lockdown sceptics article. Absolutely true, lies, damn lies…
          I think the people who are able to see past the covid rhetoric understand that the agenda is far more complex and is multifaceted. The Great Reset, population control and for the U.K. Absolute Zero (Climate Control) all kickstarted with a little virus and a whole heap of totalitarianism.

          Reply
        3. Harry de Boer

          In The Netherlands there were reports about the government pressuring the advisers to give a certain kind of advice.

          Reply
  12. Lyn

    My father, 90, has been in and out of various hospitals and care homes throughout the pandemic. He has late stage heart failure and all that goes with it. It’s a bloody miracle he’s still here as there were several outbreaks on wards he was in and the policy was NOT to move a + patient away from others sharing a bay!
    In addition, every time he moved he had to isolate for 10 days. Add to this the 4 week lockdown if a member of staff in a CH tested + and until recently I didn’t see him for 15 months.
    The whole policy around CHs has been diabolical from the outset. MH has thrown our elderly under the Covid bus. My father’s dream was to return to his own home, which we have tried to do, but he is so weakened and mentally jaded by the past year he will be going into a CH this weekend. The lack of a ‘ring of steel’ has not just caused deaths from or with Covid but a serious decline in the mental and physical well-being if our loved ones, which has affected the quality of their twilight days. I cannot write here what I feel every time I see MH slide away from questions by using slick sound bites; suffice it to say I hope there will be a reckoning but I doubt it.

    Reply
    1. Ian Partington

      Lyn. I sympathise enormously. We lost my father in law in December in similar circumstances. I will say it for you : Evil, self-serving mother- f”*kers.

      Reply
  13. AhNotepad

    Matt Hancock “I tried”. He has missed words “will be”. The case for fraud (him and Vallance Whitty and Ferguson) is scheduled to be heard in Bromley, I think in September. With Whitty’s misrepresentation of the figures to the parliamentary committee recently, (See Lockdown Sceptics) the case may be strengthened.

    Reply
  14. Fast Eddy

    If one were a cynic… one might suggest that there was an edict from a very high tower…. telling Matt to rack up as many deaths as possible (and as many false positives)…. to frighten the people… into agreeing to be Injected with who knows what.

    Reply
    1. Tim Fallon

      My brother was laughing at some Indian people that were drinking cow urine as a means of warding off cv19.
      He didn’t like it when I pointed out that letting pharma inject their ‘warp speed’ genetically modified vaccine into his body was far less sensible.

      Reply
  15. doodle2021

    Thanks for keeping up the good fight, Dr K, your work is very much appreciated. It’s hard to believe that the NHS bosses didn’t push back against the government, they must be either spineless, brainwashed, scared or censored, I guess. There doesn’t seem to be an end to the nonsense – how can they mandate this experimental jab to care workers, is that legal? The argument is that surgeons have to have the hepatitis vaccine, but that’s tried and tested, completely different situation. I give up (but I hope that you don’t)!

    (Apologies if this is a duplicate comment.)

    Reply
  16. lorrainecleaver7

    Shocking statistics Dr Kendrick. I recall debating this with an aquaintance last year who insisted we all need to stay home to protect the NHS and elderly. It was clear there was zero protection for the elderly, indeed there was evidence they were being genocided to allow middle classes to work from home. The selfish gene indeed. Thanks again for speaking out, even although no good deed goes unpunished.

    Reply
    1. Harry de Boer

      At the time HCQ was still the only known treatment, the Dutch minister of health, Hugo de Jonge, responded in parliament to a question about hcq: “This is pure quackery, no way we are going to do this.”
      Until ivermectin came in the picture, it was clearly shown that a PROPER hcq treatment could reduce mortality by 63%, also 6000 elderly died in The Netherlands during that period from covid-19.
      That man’s decision has killed roughly 4,000 elderly people and he should be tried for that.

      Reply
  17. Robert Dyson

    This government is reckless and so far has got away with it because of a compliant media. Johnson has come to believe that he can escape any mess-up. However, much of the mess is becoming irreversible and eventually there will be real public pain. it will not be good for any of us but that is the only thing that will displace this gang on the take.

    Reply
    1. Tim Fallon

      Cleverly the government have so far purchased £300 million worth of covid19 warning adds from the private media.
      In doing so they have stuffed gold into the mouth of the private MSM, they will not bit the hand that feeds them and call out the government BS.

      Reply
      1. me oliveira

        Excuse me for this: the Media, the politicians and the majority of medical doctors are the vectors of this disease. They are criminals and bastards.
        I am a MD and I know all the reasons of this writing.

        Reply
  18. Jean Humphreys

    The word “care” crops up so often that I wonder why they use it – the don’t understand what it means, for sure.
    Thank you Dr K.

    Reply
    1. Prudence Kitten

      Oh, I think they know very well what THEY mean by it, Jean.

      “You need us care for you” means, in practice, “You must do whatever we tell you to, and acquiesce in everything we do to you”.

      And, of course, “You agree that we are authorised to decree that you are not to be treated if you become sick, or resuscitated if you die”.

      Reply
    1. Prudence Kitten

      Hanging, drawing and quartering would be appropriate – although too quick.

      As our public ethics have moved on, perhaps breaking rocks and sewing mailbags for the rest of his miserable life.

      With the option of being “vaccinated” to end it all.

      Reply
    2. Ian Partington

      Along with all members of SAGE and the 460 MPs who just voted to extend lockdown until July 19th (and almost certainly beyond).

      Reply
    3. me oliveira

      First of all, run to sent him to jail. After some 6 to 10 years, being proved, correctly, that he does not suffer from syphilis nor mental disease, bring that animal to a Court Room.

      Reply
  19. Mike S.

    Thank you Dr Kendrick.

    All restrictions are now lifted here in Kentucky. Last evening we were waited on at a deli by a nice young lady who has waited on us several times before, but for the first time none of us had masks on. It was quite a delightful moment to see her beautiful smile (and perfect white teeth). We all just stood there looking at each other I can’t find the words to express how much I’ve missed sharing a smile with strangers.

    Reply
  20. Roland Ayers

    And yet it was supposed to be young people who were “killing granny” by hanging around together in parks.

    Is it so hard to blame management for following ever-changing edicts from above? What would happen if they listened to what people on the ground were telling them and adjusted strategy accordingly, even if that meant defying edicts from above? Would they be arrested? Is initiative a criminal offence in the NHS?

    Reply
    1. Harry de Boer

      After WW II it was decided in Nuernberg that “I was merely following orders.” won’t cut it.

      Reply
  21. Carole

    Bravo Malcolm. Let’s call a spade a spade and not let our glorious leaders slide out of taking responsibility for decisions made. There really is no excuse when people like yourself on the frontline we’re trying to talk sense in a very difficult time but ears where covered and there was a lot of singing la la la so as not to hear the truth. Righteous indignation and downright anger is justified. Truth without spin is required now.

    Reply
  22. Don

    A bit of bright news– Last night I was shopping in a big box home improvement store and an employee was scraping the social distancing dots off the floor. Hooray!

    Reply
    1. Tony Barry

      One thing I won’t miss (if we ever get there) is the “guard” at the shop entrance looking at me then pointing a dot on the floor and telling me to now go stand there. How we’ve been treated like mindless children.

      Reply
      1. Tarl

        But hey we got used to airport “security theater” after 9/11 and that conditioned us to accept “public health theater” after March 2020. Who knows what joys are yet to come?

        Reply
      2. Dana

        Yes, same thing happening in Cambridge, ON :”Stand on your “X” mark, wear your mask”, even though queued up outside shop, waiting for 2 customers to come out so 2 could enter! Still no haircuts allowed in hair salons/barbers.

        Reply
  23. Tim Fallon

    It is my opinion that the government (and wider political class) along with the sacred NHS are responsible for mass homicide and I think that they did this intentionally.
    Thousands of elderly and infirm people were killed by the medics when they aggressively over treated them at the start of this debacle. Pumping the frail elderly full of toxic antivirals and anti biotics along with the sedation and ventilators killed many old people.
    Another cohort of the elderly that died did so because they were thrown out of hospital and back into the care homes where they couldn’t actually get the medical assistance they genuinely needed. Add this to being isolated away from their loved ones and relentlessly told that a new invisible disese was out there just witing to kill them is it any wonder that so many died so quickly?
    Via these two methods the government created the initial spikes in deaths that served as their justification for the lockdowns .

    Ultimately this covid debacle is all about money and power. Pharma, the bankers and other key players have made a lot of money out of this and we have seen a revoultion unfold as ‘the new normal’ sees people accepting that they have to have an unlimited number of mystery substances injected into them in order to be permitted by the government to engage in some semblance of normal life.

    We are going through a top down revolution and most of the population just don’t get it.

    Reply
    1. theasdgamer

      Premature ventilation likely killed thousands. Pushing remdesivir likely didn’t help. Smearing relatively non-toxic antivirals like HCQ likely killed tens or hundreds of thousands. Don’t want any competition to the vaccines, you know.

      Reply
    2. Pauline Marks

      When the elderly were dying because of Covid rules and regulations my thoughts were about the increase in revenue to HMRC in Inheritance Tax

      Reply
  24. Tim Fallon

    Dear Malcolm
    I have both of your books and have enjoyed learning about the con that is the cholesterol heart disease hypothesis, along with the host of other medical frauds you cover in your second work.

    Would you be open to the evidece that orthodox virology is also a con?

    I would recommend that you read the book Virus Mania.
    ‘The population is terrified by reports of so-called COVID-19, measles, swine flu, SARS, BSE, AIDS or polio. However, the authors of “Virus Mania,” investigative journalist Torsten Engelbrecht, Dr. Claus Köhnlein, MD, Dr. Samantha Bailey, MD, and Dr. Stefano Scoglio, BSc PhD, show that this fearmongering is unfounded and that virus mayhem ignores basic scientific facts: The existence, the pathogenicity and the deadly effects of these agents have never been proven. The book “Virus Mania” will also outline how modern medicine uses dubious indirect lab tools claiming to prove the existence of viruses such as antibody tests and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The alleged viruses may, in fact, also be seen as particles produced by the cells themselves as a consequence of certain stress factors such as drugs.’

    In summary orthodox virology and the spin off vaccinology are about as valid as the cholseterol causes heart disease claims.

    Reply
    1. Tony Barry

      Does anyone know if they have reduced the PCR cycle count on the tests to lower the number of positives ? If the test wasn’t reliably detecting Covid then that would still be the case – unless the barrier was increased.

      Reply
      1. Ian Partington

        Expect the number of cycles to be ramped up in time for the Autumn. Got to keep the “casedemic” going so that the “emergency ” surges into 2022 and beyond. Then blame the defiant un- injected like me for the continued crisis. Ba*tards!

        Reply
    2. jill4535

      I would like to see a video of a virus entering a cell and causing disease. John N Ott talks about this in his book Health and Light. Recommended.

      Reply
    3. David Bailey

      Tim,

      I’d really like to see a reasoned discussion about this issue. There was a change in the definition of ‘isolating’ a virus which means that both AIDS and COVID-19 may not be caused by a definite virus at all. I don’t know if this change in definition can be rationally justified to not.

      AIDS seems distinctly odd – at one time it was supposedly set to wipe out a whole generation, leaving the few that didn’t engage in sex! Now it seems to be rather a rare disease. This is despite there being no vaccine, and sex still being pretty popular!

      Similarly, I understand that a disease has been discovered in the US which is polio-like but not polio:
      https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/head-neck-nervous-system/Pages/AFM.aspx
      Whatever this is, it muddies the water regarding polio (which incidentally I had, in a not too severe form).

      There really is a need to do research in these areas without the constant pressure coming from money.

      Reply
      1. Martin Back

        The AIDS virus is still around. In South Africa it infects about 650 new people every day.

        South Africa is home to almost one-fifth of people living with HIV worldwide and has an HIV prevalence rate of 20.4 per cent among adults (15-19 years). In line with trends across Sub-Saharan Africa, in 2019, women accounted for the majority of new infections in the country. Structural gender inequalities, discrimination, violence against women and girls, and unequal gender norms continue to undermine efforts by women and girls to prevent HIV and use HIV/AIDS services.

        “The stigma around HIV prevents people from seeking treatment. I have met some older patients who still fear going to the clinics because they feel judged or embarrassed,” says Chabalala.https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2020/11/feature-south-africa-young-women-lead-hiv-and-violence-prevention

        The reason it seems rather rare is that most people are aware of the risks of certain sexual practices and take steps to protect themselves, plus medication can reduce the viral load to practically zero and give infected people a normal life span. Plus of course no one talks about it if they’ve got it. There’s still a big stigma about it.

        The idea that there is no virus is to my mind is as crazy as asserting that the moon landings were faked. How else do you explain the virus-like behavior of the disease?

        Reply
      2. Prudence Kitten

        There seems to be a case that AIDS is not caused by HIV at all, but by other factors such as stress, drugs, pollution and malnutrition. In Africa it has been suggested that many conditions, with disparate causes, are lumped together as “AIDS”. Since the drugs prescribed are so harsh, it seems possible that many deaths from “AIDS” may be due to the treatment.

        Sound at all familiar?

        Reply
  25. AndrewH

    Thanks for your regular dose of sanity…or, in this case, pointing out the insanity.
    Amnesty International (UK) have been onto this since last year. Hopefully some justice will prevail, even if if it is just seeing some booted out of office, if not prison.
    https://www.amnesty.org.uk/care-homes-report
    But exactly why we kept my dying MiL with dementia out of a care home. She died earlier this year, but at least did not spend her last year in a dystopian hell ,like millions of others.
    Hard work but had all the cuddles off the grandkids in her final year.

    Reply
  26. Steve

    Great article (read it yesterday on RT !). Unfortunately, I’m coming to the conclusion that there is nothing much anyone with a drop of commonsense can do about all this nonsense. They continue the blatant lies and corruption – and get away with it – and it appears the majority of the lemming like population think they are doing a great job. Apparently, even the regime hierarchy think that Handcock is a useless, lying, incompetent. Maybe they are saving him as a useful idiot to sacrifice when needed.
    My prediction that ‘they’ are trying to spin out restrictions until the start of the annual winter flu season seems more and more likely.
    There is a good takedown on the latest lies from No 10 and Sage, here:
    https://lockdownsceptics.org/2021/06/15/a-doctor-writes-chris-whittys-slide-show-yesterday-was-a-blatant-exercise-in-biased-data-selection/
    My biggest fear is that my, perfectly healthy 90 yr old, parents succumb to something and have to go into the geriatric death mills that NHS Hospitals have become and I’m unable to see them.
    Keep up the good work Doctor K, you are one of the good guys, respect.

    Reply
  27. Nigella P

    I knew this was coming, having read your posts from early in the pandemic. I watched the depositions by both Cummings and Hancock and it confirmed in my mind that we are currently governed by self-serving fools. I am endlessly disgusted by this Government and continue to be.

    I think FINALLY more people are questioning the rhetoric. I noted the slides were very carefully tailored for maximum doom and gloom in Monday’s announcement by the trio of ghouls that I’ve seen far too much of this last year. I notice that there is much greater resistance and questioning of this latest extension. I think most people are just cracking on now and I feel desperately sorry for those businesses that are prevented from doing so, by law.

    Anyhow, thank you as ever for maintaining sanity Dr K. It is a shame that you have to, but much appreciated by me.

    Reply
    1. JohnC

      One of the graphs used by the BBC uses a logarithmic scale on the y axis, it is even labelled as a log scale. A lot of people won’t realise the significance of using a logarithmic scale as opposed to a linear scale, it actually exaggerates the size of the uptick in recent “cases”.

      Reply
  28. Gary Ogden

    Thanks, Dr. Kendrick. I think the nursing home death rate in the U.S. is closer to 50%, at least in some places, such as New York. Deadly incompetence is what we have seen in our political leaders.

    Reply
    1. JohnC

      Not sure, but I think Sweden emptied their hospitals of elderly patients back into care homes and also had a significant death rate. They did apologise for this late last year.
      Also wasn’t there a significant proportion of cases that were nosocomial?

      Reply
    1. Steve

      It won’t happen. If he’s fired he’ll take the revolving door into another high paid role.
      And anyway, Handcock is just one of the incompetent crooks responsible for the chaos in the country. Bozo, Gove, Cummings, Patel, Whitty, Vallance, Harding, etc. they all belong behind bars – but they’ll only benefit from their incompetence, while the rest of us pay the price.

      Reply
    1. Prudence Kitten

      My feeling exactly, SteveR.

      Give me someone who is openly bad rather than a bunch of “creeping Jesuses” doing immense harm while pretending to do good.

      Uriah Heep lives.

      Reply
  29. Janice Willoughby

    Thanks again from the U.S.. Big tech censorship is a growing concern here: Independent blogs such as yours, Dr. Kendrick, are crucial in the battle for free speech. Free speech, many of us believe, is crucial in the battle for information, ideas, and wisdom. Right: that includes wisdom in personal decisions re health; and wisdom in public health decisions from policy-makers. Counting on you to keep up the good fight-

    Reply
  30. Christine

    I just picked up your book again, “ The Great Cholesterol Con”. Re- reading the effects of social dislocation, stress, anger, low control in the work environment…….. sounds like the last 15 months could be storing up a lot more cases of heart disease, besides endless other health problems ( not including Covid!). Thank you again for all you do and all that you are Dr K.

    Reply
  31. Jude

    I understand your frustration Dr Kendrick. However, we seem to be learning, every day, that doing the right, fair and honourable thing is not what this countrys government is about. It is reminding me more and more of a bunch of silly schoolboys who are unable to accept responsibility for making decisions that had catastrophic consequences. What is worse is that nothing is being done about it. These fools are still running the country (into the ground).

    Reply
    1. Ian Partington

      All too tragically true. The disgusting fact is that the powers-that -be will get away with this, and other, deliberate policies of mass destruction.

      Reply
  32. LA_Bob

    Another great, tragic post.

    In a prior post, Dr Kendrick suggested the Lockdown Leaders expect a backlash sooner or later and will try to line up the politicians to protect them. Hancock seems to be preparing for this. Methinks it will get ugly.

    Reply
  33. Peripatetic Commenter

    “but they simply stated they were just following policy so ‘you can’t blame me’.”

    Didn’t they say something about that at the Nuremberg Trials?

    Reply
    1. Prudence Kitten

      “Didn’t they say something about that at the Nuremberg Trials?”

      Yes indeed. Theodore Dalrymple pointed out, in one of his many essays, how indignant many of the Nazis were to be held responsible for their crimes when, as they complained, they had joined the Nazi movement precisely to escape from the burden of personal responsibility.

      Reply
  34. Mary PM

    I’m a manager in A group of care homes and can testify this is 100% correct. We were told by our suppliers that ALL PPE stock had been requisitioned by NHS and could NOT be sold to us! The stock we did get rocketed in price by over 600%
    And Hancock has the audacity to say there’s no list of homes??? Cqc lists every home in the country on its website. The man is either an outright liar or is deluded.

    Reply
  35. Carole

    Ann Robinson and the game show springs to mind. I tried……you failed, you are the weakest link. Goodbye!

    As lockdown has now been extended for another 4 weeks I read somewhere that once lockdown ends this means the pandemic is officially over in the UK and it is no longer lawful to use the experimental injection as the emergency powers end. Is this true?

    Which is driving which- everyone must be jabbed so continue the pandemic in name only or sage is genuinely concerned about the nhs (not sure why with current actual number) so continuing lockdown is essential which by the way allows more sheep to be jabbed with the yet to be authorised injection.

    Reply
  36. Elizabeth Rostaing

    Absolutely disgraceful!! Mr Hancock is responsible for all deaths in care homes and he should be accountable for it and resign
    What this government did is criminal and still is

    Reply
  37. Marion Harrington

    “Ring of steel”. We had the same terminology in Victoria here in Australia. Maybe they share a hand book of covid phrases to use? I believe the politicians have realised they stuffed up mightily during this coronavirus scandal and now can’t back track. I’m 70 and the health services here are really pushing for us to get the jab

    Reply
  38. S Jay

    Very concise article about the cruel and deliberate attempt to kill off our elderly and vulnerable. I assume you’ve read about Hancock and medazilam and also the Liverpool care pathway being used again. Also listen to the people whose loved ones were helped to die, they were speaking with Richie Allen and Jacqui Devoy on Richies show June 10. RichieAllen.co.U.K.
    This man needs to be brought to justice 🪓 he’s a killer.

    Reply
  39. JohnC

    A hypothetical question, had these poor people not been discharged whilst still ill, would there have been the spike in excess deaths in April 2020? Would the excess deaths been spread out over a longer period? Without doubt CoViD19 as presented in early 2020 was a nasty disease, but did the mass discharge make the problem more acute?

    Reply
    1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

      Yes, because they were almost universally discharged with DNAR (Do not actively resuscitate) forms in their notes. So, none of them were allowed back in hospital. The ambulance crews simply would not take them. No matter whether or not they had COVID19, or were suffering from other – potentially treatable – conditions. I had a few stand up rows with ambulance crews about this. At least two patients I managed died from treatable conditions.

      Reply
      1. JohnC

        But DNA(CP)R only applies if there’s a cardiac arrest not a blanket withdrawal of treatment, there is absolutely no excuse for an ambulance not to take an ill patient into hospital.
        Also, as far as I am aware, there needs to be a community DNAR in situ which has to be reauthorised by the ambulance NHS trust, there is no universally transferable DNAR, unless there’s an advanced directive from the patient in place which specifies what should be done in the event of any number of scenarios (note that this from memory of the situation 7 years ago when I worked in A&E).

        Reply
        1. Dr. Malcolm Kendrick Post author

          DNARs accompany the patient. There is no need for re-authorisation any more. Yes, they should mean no CPR, but their remit has inexorably widened. It has come to mean, do not send the patient into hospital. Advanced directives are very rare things, and can never be found when needed. At the peak of Covid panic, DNAR meant – patient to die at home, or in a care home. In our area it was, at one point, stated policy with ‘Covid’ patients.

          Reply
  40. Ian Partington

    All too tragically true. The disgusting fact is that the powers-that -be will get away with this, and other, deliberate policies of mass destruction.

    Reply
  41. Paul Dixon

    The appalling Johnson, Hancock, Witty, Valance shouldn’t be stood at a pulpit explaining spreadsheets of dubious provenance and taking questions, but stood in a dock explaining policies and answering charges of corporate manslaughter.

    Reply
  42. Igor M.

    This was (or is) a repeat of the Plague when healthy yet vulnerable were locked up with the infected… except in those times it was just with the members of their families.

    Reply
  43. Jeremy May

    I’m someone who very much enjoys the company of older people, often in preference to those younger than me. (I’m 61). There’s less aggression, less ego.
    Older generations have dignity and respect and they engender the same from me. They often have a quiet ‘knowing’ air, a smile at a shared memory, mine recent, theirs from long ago.
    During the pandemic they were the first to listen and adhere to official guidelines, partly because they were at high risk, but also because they have a long-established respect for, and trust in, authority.
    To hear that so many have been treated as expendable pawns is heartbreaking.

    Reply
    1. theasdgamer

      If older people pay attention to their memories, they will find many reasons to distrust government. Here in the States, we have constitutional protections precisely because our Founders didn’t trust government.

      MAGA people tend to be older here and distrustful of the media and government pronouncements.

      It’s about due diligence, not aggression or ego.

      But if you have dementia, you may just go along.

      Reply
  44. johnplatinumgoss

    It’s the edicts from above that sums up the problem for me. The NHS has become top-heavy with bureaucrats and they are running the show. Bring back the old family practices where doctors knew not just the patients but their families before them. I can remember my family doctor. In those days doctors had time for patients. Today medical practices are run by people without a medical background to a timetable like British Rail. It is not about how sick you are but about how fast they can get you seen before the next train arrives. And all this is done over the phone.

    I gave up with my neck problem which I realise is not going to go away, and may have been caused by the Highters Heath 5G transmitter outside an infant school, since my neck is now magnetic. About 8 months ago I was diagnosed over the phone as having spondylitis – due to my age. My wife got me the appointment because I gave up. I believe if you phone now you get a recorded message “Please hold the line” you are nineteenth in the queue” and you are very important to them. Anybody recognise this? After waiting on the phone for two hours you are told that there are no appointments. So, top-heavy bureaucracy, well done – the system’s really working.

    Reply
    1. theasdgamer

      NHS is _designed_ to become top heavy with bureaucrats. This is _not_ accidental.

      Why is this? Socialism allows a few predatory parasites to live off of and control the populace. And doctors are a threat to their power, so health administration parasites have to control doctors.

      Reply
      1. andy

        Do not forget musicians and others who work slightly outside the normal economic system and have their own voters and population that listen to them. THey too are a threat to government and their freedom to be a protest singer needs to be curtailed. Not that the most famous protest sing of them all has as much as lifted his pen. Where are you Bob then? Blowin’ i the wind, eh?

        Reply
    1. David Bailey

      In the current circumstances, I’d be reluctant to be treated as an in-patient in any case, and I’m happy to waive my right to be treated for COVID in hospital – I simply do not trust the health service at all – neither to vaccinate me, nor to treat me.

      Reply
      1. a

        Thats a very interesting comment Mr B’ I went to the pub last night and found it still empty of the old locals. I had not considered that the year of fear mongering would still be around enough for it to hold people back from going. There may be backlogs in the the NHS but I would feel that there are many like you …and me..who regard it all now as not to be trusted.

        Reply
        1. Marion Husband

          Perhaps people are avoiding the pubs, cafes and restaurants (as I am) because they can’t stand seeing people in masks – which according to edict have to be worn if you are not seated. I cannot abide seeing anyone, anywhere in a mask and have never ever worn one. I am beginning to think that most people are either very stupid or….what – cowards? Fright isn’t the only reason that is keeping people at home, hatred of the idiocy has something to do with it, if I am anything to go by and not just a very angry freak.

          Reply
          1. Jerome Savage

            Marion
            Not alone is it very probably unhealthy. It gives me a headache looking at stupifying idiocy maskerading as healthcare.

    2. Prudence Kitten

      In my case, I can’t easily think how the NHS could reduce the “care” it gives me. Thinking back to about 2000, there was that time when they syringed my ears to get rid of wax…

      And of course for the past 15 months, I could have died in agony without the NHS paying the slightest attention.

      In spite of all the taxes we are compelled to pay towards it, I think we would all be very wise to take very good care of our own health.

      As Will Rogers said long ago, “Be happy you don’t get all the government you’re paying for”.

      Reply
      1. Prudence Kitten

        Incidentally, I gather they don’t syringe ears any more. You are told to go to Boots and buy some commercial remedy.

        Mustn’t reduce the cash flow!

        Reply
      2. theasdgamer

        I had thought that that quote was original to Ronald Reagan. Thanks for the correction.

        Nowadays, Will Rogers is more in line with republican thinking, although in his day he was a democrat.

        Reply
        1. Prudence Kitten

          “So when all the yielding and objections is over, the other Senator said, “I object to the remarks of a professional joker being put into the Congressional Record.” Taking a dig at me, see? They didn’t want any outside fellow contributing. Well, he had me wrong. Compared to them I’m an amateur, and the thing about my jokes is that they don’t hurt anybody. You can say they’re not funny or they’re terrible or they’re good or whatever it is, but they don’t do no harm. But with Congress — every time they make a joke it’s a law. And every time they make a law it’s a joke”.

          – Will Rogers, Ambassador of Good Will, Prince of Wit and Wisdom (1935) https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Will_Rogers

          Reply
    3. me oliveira

      johnplatinumgoss,
      We must search and find where is the money and to whom it goes.

      @ 2:11 pm — you described a thing that is equal in a socialist lead country: Portugal. People even have Cardiology appointments (with day and hour) for a consultation by phone! Brave new world of criminals. I’m not lying.

      Reply
  45. The Dim Appear

    Talking of care homes I see the UK government are attempting to make vaccination of staff compulsory, along with all NHS staff. It’s only a short step to then turning around and saying that not enough people have come forward to be vaccinated in the general population and so they need to make vaccination compulsory for everyone.

    I’m not sure if the number is true but some said almost 1M people marched through London recently to oppose lockdown. Some will also presumably not be interested in any vaccine. There’s a big reason right there to carry on with restrictions too. You can see these things coming from kilometers away.

    If they start talking about compulsory vaccination perhaps the first order of business will be to buy a good pair of running shoes. Second order of business will be to learn to run. Very fast.

    Reply
    1. Steve

      And, apparently they will extend the mandatory vaccinations to service staff who work with care homes: Plumbers, Electricians, Builders, Caterers, etc. – and, I assume, visiting family members.

      What I don’t understand is that the vaccine doesn’t prevent the spread of the Flu or give the receivers of the governments prick immunity from the Flu. So obviously, mandatory vaccinations for care home staff is NOT about protection of residents or staff ? Politics in action, again.

      Reply
  46. Shaun Clark

    Malcolm, You tried, and one thing I have come to understand, is that you will try, and try again. Thank you

    Reply
  47. Emperor

    The first-ever autopsy of a person vaccinated against COVID-19, who tested negative 18 days later upon hospital admission but at 24 days after the VAX, has revealed viral RNA was found in almost every organ of the body. The vaccine, while triggering an immune response, DID NOT STOP the virus from entering every organ in the body.

    The viral RNA was found in virtually every organ in the body, which means the spike proteins as well.

    There are antibodies (like the “vaccine” is supposed to create) but they’re irrelevant because, based on a study from Japan, we now know that the spike S1 protein is what does the damage.

    We spoke to one Infectious Disease specialist from a hospital in New Jersey this morning. We sent the actual autopsy findings to him and asked for his thoughts.

    When he called back a while later, he was clearly shaken-up. He told us “You cannot quote me by name, I will get fired by the hospital if you do.” We agreed to conceal his identity.

    https://halturnerradioshow.com/index.php/en/news-page/world/global-time-bomb-first-case-of-postmortem-study-of-patient-vaccinated-against-sars-cov-2-mrna-found-in-every-organ-of-the-body

    Reply
    1. theasdgamer

      Bear in mind that covid does its damage via coagulopathy, primarily. And you will find capillaries in every organ in the body.

      I wonder if there’s a difference in degree of viral penetration of organs between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated.

      I think that the pharma claim is that vaccines will reduce damage, not prevent infection.

      That’s not to say that the CDC or NHS have a clue about any of this. Vaccine passports, lol. They are going nowhere.

      Reply
  48. Fast Eddy

    Crestwood Funeral Home and Cremation Services – Midtown Obituary
    It is with deep sadness we announce the passing of Ben Goodman, age 32, who died suddenly due to heart failure on March 14, 2021 in New York City. Ben is survived by his fiancée, Lindsay Janisse, his mother Cindy Shelley, his father and stepmother Jeff and Pamela Goodman, his brothers Andrew. https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/name/benjamin-goodman-obituary

    Reply
  49. Emperor

    This is a must watch.

    Twitter Censors Martin Kulldorff (Prof Harvard Med. School) for Saying No Need to Vaccinate Everyone

    Reply
  50. Fast Eddy

    “because of the lockdowns giving the virus enough time to mutate, we had escape mutations that started the wave in November. So we are currently experiencing the result of the lockdowns. Without lockdowns, we would not have any COVID right now.”

    KNUT WITTKOWSKI
    CEO of ASDERA/Epidemiologist

    “Everything in this epidemic is done upside down. It almost feels like people want to obscure what’s going on”

    KNUT WITTKOWSKI
    CEO of ASDERA/Epidemiologist

    “With every new wave, we’re starting a new wave of lockdowns. The lockdowns are creating a new virus. Then we have a new epidemic.”

    KNUT WITTKOWSKI
    CEO of ASDERA/Epidemiologist

    https://dryburgh.com/knut-wittkowski-lockdowns-are-creating-a-new-virus/

    Reply
  51. Fast Eddy

    Wazzz up here?

    The corona crisis might be over, but all over Israel adults and children are getting sick with viral infections in a phenomenon that is unprecedented for this time of the year, according to several medical professionals.

    “We have never seen anything like this,” said Dr. Tal Brosh, head of Infectious Disease Unit at the Samson Assuta Ashdod Hospital. “We’ve been monitoring viral infections in the hospital, which of course is just the tip of the iceberg of what is going on in the community, as for each hospitalized patient, there are many more out there. Since the spring, we have been seeing an increasing number of respiratory diseases, and since May there has been a surge in RSV cases.”

    RSV is not the only virus that is widely circulating – other diseases that are currently infecting a growing number of people are a type of adenovirus, the human metapneumovirus (HMPV), and the rhinovirus. All of them are associated with respiratory symptoms and other symptoms similar to those of a severe cold. At the same time, influenza has not hit the country since the winter previous to the pandemic.

    https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-19-might-be-over-but-viral-infections-in-israel-are-surging-671354

    Reply
    1. Doug from Canada

      Gee, couldn’t be ADE, we would have seen it in phase II and III trials, oh, wait a minute ………

      Reply
      1. Eggs ‘n beer

        Not if it’s RSV. Queensland hospitals were overrun with RSV cases this summer and we haven’t had Covid here yet. Going to be a disaster when we finally open up and get hit with every variant simultaneously.

        Reply
  52. Hamilton Semple

    We knew that the health response was poor, that the coordination was poor, communication was poor. This analysis exposes how utterly devastating and shocking we now have to deal with these failures.
    As you say, you could not make it up……to design a system that resulted in the very worst outcome possible.
    Thank you again for your excellent work.

    Reply
  53. David

    A friend is buying some Ivermectin tablets … from abroad. I agreed to add to the order.

    For a generic out-of-patent drug, it seems to have become a ‘nice little earner’, £25 for 100 he says. 100 tablets/doses seems to be more than one will ever need … but never mind. I’ll probably stockpile mine in the fridge or freezer, just in case. (More likely the freezer as the shelf life rises dramatically as one lowers the temperature.)

    Bret Weinstein commented I think that because it’s more effective than a jab countries could probably eradicate COVID this way, much as the world eradicated smallpox. Even at 25 p a dose, which is currently ‘what the market will bear’, it’s very cheap.

    Reply
      1. Eggs ‘n beer

        You can buy it in various forms from your local farmers’ produce store, or on line from

        https://www.moleonline.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=Ivomec

        The dose for his sheep should be about right. And for those who say you would have to be nuts to be taking a drug from a farmers store which has been safely used in humans for 33 years without knowing what the exact dosage, yet will happily take a vaccine which has not yet finished its clinical trials let alone established a lengthy safety reputation and is prescribed in a standard one size fits all injection for two-year-olds up to 240 kg blobs then I just shake my head.

        Reply
    1. me oliveira

      I would put one third of the tablets on the fridge, in that compartment designed to make ice. They will be well conserved for months after the ‘expiring date’, and are ready for an emergency.
      The rest (2/3) I’ll put on a freezer (minus 40 to 50 degrees Celsius). I’ll recover them after putting them in the fridge, allowing to gain fridge temperature in some 2 or 3 days.
      The first third is to apply immediately.

      Reply
      1. andy

        Is the need to keep medicines in the fridge simply a constructed pharma shelt life ? I have often wondered if drugs are deliberately made to expire this way?

        Reply
        1. me oliveira

          Some 20-25 years ago the big pharma obtained the international approval to shortening from 10 year to 5 year the life-time of a package.
          This brings several billions (£,€, etc) of annual sparing in chemical and physical substances to preserve a drug. Most of a tablet or capsule is preservative ‘excipients’. Besides nobody could handle/see a pill of 0.5 mg of whatsoever.

          Reply
          1. Prudence Kitten

            Thanks for your comment, me oliveira. May I suggest that instead of “sparing” you mean “saving”? (More idiomatic).

      2. Dr. John H

        I recall reading a study some years ago (maybe on Mercola’s site?) where the researchers tested a bunch of meds that were 40 years old. All tested good as new, the only exception was eye drops.

        Reply
  54. lingulella

    If anyone has two hours to spare, this https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mika-Turkia/publication/350610718_A_Timeline_of_Ivermectin-Related_Events_in_the_COVID-19_Pandemic_April_3_2021/links/6068b4a4458515614d32e5de/A-Timeline-of-Ivermectin-Related-Events-in-the-COVID-19-Pandemic-April-3-2021.pdf?origin=publication_detail Is worth reading to see how every attempt to bring ivermectin to the attention of voters in the ‘developed’ world has been thwarted or at least hidden from public examination.
    As the author says, the pharmaceutical industry should be stripped of its advantages over all other realms of human endeavour.

    Reply
    1. theasdgamer

      Reminds me of one of my old comments on Dr. Kendrick’s site about the panic-mongering by the public health brainiacs having induced a germophobia neurosis in half the population.

      Reply
  55. lingulella

    Over at https://www.brighteon.com/5b9f4df1-701d-4ba8-b080-7a8d391af98c they seem to have found out how the side effects aren’t actually killing people.
    The VAERS database has gaps in the sequence that shouldn’t be there, gaps that used to be deaths after vaccination. But then later, as if by magic the gaps are filled again by people who didn’t die.
    Something stinks.
    Are these made up records? If not how do the fit in the date sequence- they shouldn’t should they?
    Is the same thing happening in the Yellow Card here or in the European system?

    Reply
  56. Prudence Kitten

    And here we go, folks! You could not make this up.

    “A Pill To Treat Covid-19? The US Is Betting on It”.
    https://news.slashdot.org/story/21/06/18/212203/a-pill-to-treat-covid-19-the-us-is-betting-on-it

    “Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a key backer of the program, said he looked forward to a time when Covid-19 patients could pick up antiviral pills from a pharmacy as soon as they tested positive for the coronavirus or develop Covid-19 symptoms. “I wake up in the morning, I don’t feel very well, my sense of smell and taste go away, I get a sore throat,” Dr. Fauci said in an interview. “I call up my doctor and I say, ‘I have Covid and I need a prescription.'”

    Reply
    1. Eggs ‘n beer

      Stunning!! Thank God we have Dr Fauci slaving away for our benefit with all the work he’s funding both in the US and China. What will the name of the new wonderdrug be? Hydroxymectin? Iverchloroquine?

      Reply
    2. Prudence Kitten

      In case anyone has missed the significance of my earlier post, Dr Fauci and his pals are effectively saying (shouting), “Roll up! Roll up! Buy your brand-new (and hence amazingly wonderful) anti-Covid pills from Big Pharma! Available soon at a knock-down price of only $1,000 per pill!! And whatever you do, pay no attention to that highly illegal and dangerous Ivermectin/ Hydroxychloroquine/ Vitamin D/ Zinc behind the curtain!”

      Reply
      1. Eggs ‘n beer

        Actually, you’ve missed the true message. Vaccines don’t work, are not safe, and will soon be withdrawn after the maximum number of suckers have been poisoned. But don’t worry, new poisons are under development (as you say, at $1,000 per shot for my patented one). These will lead to Poison Passports.

        Reply
        1. andy

          At some point covid will be declared beaten, and all thanks to the vaccine passports, and this will be the way to beat all future epidemics of any kind whatsoever, and you all do as we say.

          Reply
    3. me oliveira

      P K,
      @ June 20, 2021 at 8:40 am
      I was unable to thank you. My English is poor. WordPress was cheating me.

      Reply
      1. Prudence Kitten

        Actually I think your English is very good. But it’s very hard to master all the idioms and shades of meaning in a second language.

        You won’t catch me posting in French, Spanish, German, Portuguese or any other language but English! 😎

        Reply
  57. liz3321

    This blog never seems to think about the maximum suppression approach that has worked so well in many eastern countries. By having excellent systems of tack and trace, and proper financial and practical support for isolating, they have stopped the virus getting out of control – so either no need for lockdowns, or only for brief ones. They have avoided the deaths of vulnerable people. Here’s Prof Anthony Costello in a series of 4 tweets with data and graphs of the difference in outcomes between the approaches. As he says “We were told you cannot suppress Covid so “we must live with the virus”. When Asian states did suppress Covid19, within a month by early March 2020, SAGE were ‘unanimous’ that these states would face a huge second wave.” They haven’t.
    He also gives a comparison of death rates in countries that did and did not suppress the virus with effective find, test and supported isolation programmes.

    Reply
    1. Eggs ‘n beer

      The global hlth twit is wrong, and so are you. The suppression of the virus comes at a significant cost of life. Setting aside the 30% increase in suicides, increased domestic violence and depression, the whole country lives in fear of the next lockdown, which can be easily caused by false positive tests (yes, one false positive, from someone who it was almost impossible for him to have contracted it, lead to a one week lockdown until the autopsy results were known …). As for “protecting” the elderly, your arrogance is amazing. Assuming that they want you to remove every aspect of life that made it worth living when you’re 90, 100, 105 – can’t go out, can’t have visitors, no trips to the shops …. what an unreal, condescending liz3321-knows-best attitude. They know they’re near death. Most of them that I know want to live life for what time they have left.

      And for what overall benefit? Australia’s economy has been shattered, several sources of foreign income and food production have been eliminated severely affecting neighbouring countries, and we have had no exposure to the virus to strengthen our immune systems. Instead the virus continues to develop new variants, so we’ll be hit by all of them at once. Hopefully by that time our chief medical officials will have removed hydroxychloroquine from the illegal prescription drug list and encouraged ivermectin, because it’s clear that the vaccines aren’t working or safe.

      Reply
      1. David

        Reply to eggs ‘n beer

        As far as I know, most Far Eastern countries except Japan had SARS-1 in 2003 and have some protection against what we should maybe call SARS-2. Hong Kong particularly was traumatised by SARS-1, with its fatality rate of 10%.

        So far as I’m aware, these six countries chose no lockdown and no/minimal suppression of SARS-2 … Sweden, Belarus, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Japan and Taiwan

        Unfortunately the president of Tanzania died before the final outcome of his anti-WHO policy and his decision to let normal life go on could be witnessed and reported on.

        Australia and NZ aren’t much use as examples. They’re following a zero-COVID policy. It seems to equate to totalitarianism; see Michie’s comment (a member of SAGE) that we need masks and lockdowns – or was it distancing? – for ever (and maybe a police state).

        Within the USA, S Dakota and possibly a few other states never had restrictions. Florida removed them in September 2020, Texas got rid of them in March 2021, Georgia a bit earlier.

        ‘Land of the free’? It seems more like it than it does here.

        Reply
        1. Eggs ‘n beer

          There is no “seems” about it. Currently you only have to register with the government every time you want to go to pubs, restaurants, and cafés. From July 9th it’s almost everywhere. Including campsites! Fun runs. The government will know where you are, all the time.

          https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/check-in-qld

          Reply
  58. Mystykyn

    Many of those in care homes because it is no longer possible to care for them in the community and some are compulsorily detained there under the Mental Capacity Act. Yet quite serious obstacles were placed in the way of families willing to do the caring themselves nowthey were furloughed/WAH.One of those obstacles was keeping the person in covid isolation. If it had not been for that requirement, yes maybe more would have died. But of those who didn’t, might they now be in a better place, emotionally and cognitively, if they hadn’t been kept safe in this way?

    Reply
    1. Steve

      Unintended consequences, with benefits for the likes of Gates et al, or not ?
      “… the vaccine did not stay in the deltoid muscle where they were injected … but circulated throughout the body and accumulated in large concentrations in organs and tissues, including … in the ovaries.”
      https://www.globalresearch.ca/inventor-mrna-technology-vaccine-causes-lipid-nanoparticles-accumulate-high-concentrations-ovaries/5748020
      “Britain’s medicines regulator has received reports from almost 4,000 women, mostly aged between 30 and 49, who have suffered period problems after taking a Covid vaccine.”
      https://lockdownsceptics.org/2021/06/20/thousands-of-women-suffering-period-problems-following-covid-vaccination/

      Reply
  59. kb

    The person who ordered all the elderly out of hospital and into care homes was not actually Matt Hancock. It was someone high up in the NHS. Forgot the name now.

    Reply
    1. Steve

      Beware the Trojan Horses”
      “A former health insurance industry executive, Simon Stevens, was appointed to run NHS
      England in 2014. NHS England is the money side of the NHS. It handles the budgeting and commissioning of health services. That makes, Simon Stevens, one of the most important people in the whole NHS operation. As of 2015, Stevens was paid a salary of between £190,000 and £194,999 by NHS England, making him one of the 328 most highly paid people in the British public sector at that time.

      Stevens was born on 4 August 1966 in Birmingham, England. He was educated at St. Bartholomew’s School and Balliol College, Oxford where he was president of the Oxford Union in the same academic year as close friend Boris Johnson. He received an MBA from the University of Strathclyde, and was a Harkness Fellow at Columbia University, New York. His wife, Maggie, is an American public health specialist.

      His Curriculum Vitae shows that his training as a health system privatiser
      started when he graduated from Oxford aged 21. Stevens was a Labour councillor for Brixton, in the London Borough of Lambeth 1998–2002.From 2001 to 2004 was health policy adviser to Tony Blair. He was closely associated with the development of the NHS Plan 2000.

      Stevens worked for US health giant UnitedHealth from 2004 to 2013. In that role he became a founder member of a US lobby group explicitly trying to use TTIP to force state-run health systems, including the NHS, to employ private health firms from the US.

      In April 2014, Stevens was appointed CEO of NHS England, by David Cameron.”

      Reply
        1. theasdgamer

          It was British globalist spies who launched the Russia Collusion political smear op against Trump…

          Christopher Steele
          Joseph Mifsud (targeted Papadopoulos)
          Alexander Downer (former Australian Foreign Minister run by MI-6)
          Andrew Wood
          Alex Younger
          various unnamed MI-6 sources who vouched for Steele’s credibility

          https://www.westernjournal.com/dick-morris-could-the-fbi-and-mi6-have-planted-a-british-mole-in-trump-campaign/

          There are so many lies in the following article, but the collusion between US globalists–at the CIA and FBI–and British globalists is very clear.

          https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/13/british-spies-first-to-spot-trump-team-links-russia

          Were British bankers behind these British globalist attacks?

          Reply
  60. Fast Eddy

    The observation that the effectiveness of mass vaccination campaigns, as assessed during a pandemic of immune escape variants, oftentimes evolves very differently between countries or regions is, therefore, not surprising. It is only when the population-level selective immune pressure will culminate that variants and, therefore, the effects of these campaigns will start to globally converge to the same endpoint, which is ‘resistance’ to the vaccines.

    It is only at that very endpoint that all assessments of the alleged ‘effectiveness’ of this experiment will be unanimous and consistent. When exactly this will happen is still subject to speculation. However, as the immune selection pressure in the global population is now ‘massively’ rising and the set of naturally selected, S-directed mutations together with the plasticity thereof dramatically expanding, one can reasonably expect that the edition of a super variant capable of resisting S-specific Abs will be precipitated such as to emerge within the next few months.

    When second-generation vaccines will be introduced, the virus will only be building upon this versatile foundation of circulating mutations to rapidly circumvent the immune pressure the re-vaccinated population will continue to exert on the S protein.

    https://www.geertvandenbossche.org/post/why-the-ongoing-mass-vaccination-experiment-drives-a-rapid-evolutionary-response-of-sars-cov-2

    Reply
      1. tonyP

        Mike Yeadon and Geert Vanden Bossche are clearly at odds over Covid vaccinations. Vanden Bossche comes across as a typical scaremonger who hides behind lots of “scientific” jargon. He never tries to reach down to ordinary people – even when you think he may be coming to the point – more jargon! I know in whose word I am more confident.

        Reply
      2. theasdgamer

        The vaccines were rolled out _after_ herd immunity to covid had already occurred–in January–in the US.

        So van Bossche’s worry is irrelevant for the US and maybe for Europe. It might be a big problem for those who locked down, like NZ and Australia.

        Reply
        1. Eggs ‘n beer

          Absolutely. With all the variants at once. We already have an outbreak of three with the alpha type in Queensland, with an epidemic of delta (for which the Pfizer at least, according to the Israelis, offers no protection) in Sydney totalling 65 cases. State borders closed or closing, govt tracing app brought forward from 9 July to today compulsory for nearly all retail businesses and leisure activities (including campsites) {news just pinged in four Sydney areas in one week lockdown}, what on earth will they try when the numbers get serious? Cryogenic suspended animation?

          Note that the app is compulsory for businesses to display the QR code; NOT for people to use it. Probably have some fun with this one.

          Reply
          1. andy

            it is turning into a sort of global-war-of-the-worlds now. Mankind vs a flu virus. What is the ultimate aim of this hysteria…No cases evermore? Total herd Immunity? Continuous vaccinations for evermore? Sacrificing our society for overworked nurses in the NHS? social credit chips?

          2. Jerome Savage

            If the authorities were remotely sincere, they would make the nurses aming the best paid staffing group in the health service.

  61. Shaun Clark

    Sars/Covid-19/Vaccines? What to do? Well, I’ve decided to go with the logical mix of Ivermectin and Ivorcummins. Sorted.

    Reply
  62. The Dim Appear

    The UK government has recently signed a trade deal with Australia allowing cheaper imports of meat products. It has been reported this may result in 1,000s of farmers in the UK going out of business as they will presumably be unable to compete on price.

    In an age of fighting man made global warming this seems an odd move. Why would you want to encourage all that extra shipping from the other side of the world and with it all that extra co2 it will produce?

    When the system begins to reconfigure the transportation sector in the fight against man made global warming imports not just from Australia but also other countries may be reduced so how will the UK still be able to obtain enough meat if many of their own producers are out of business?

    Reply
    1. Prudence Kitten

      Valid questions! The UK had managed to become self-sufficient in food by 1945 – for obvious reasons – but today it imports more than half the food it needs. That’s 34 million people whose continued survival depends on the kindness of foreigners.

      I think the short answer is “money”. Someone is going to profit from this new arrangement, and that’s that. To hell with the food security of British people. And as for “global warming” – you never really believed that, I hope? It is another way for a select few to enrich themselves (further).

      What interests me most is: how can Australia produce meat more cheaply than the UK, with additional costs of freezing and transportation? Australia is no poorer than we are (to put it mildly) and I should think has equally stringent agricultural and animal protection laws. Think on.

      Reply
      1. Eggs ‘n beer

        Easy. Take 2,000 steers. Give them 20,000 acres of semi-cleared bush to graze on. Round them up 18 months later and send them to market.

        Farmer’s job for 18 months – check the fencing (if he’s got any) and the dams. Depending on the area maybe bring them in once for tick or buffalo fly treatment. Play with the auto gyro, quad bikes, horses, drive 8hrs for a game of bowls and tell everyone at the pub how bad the season’s been and laugh at the mask wearing morons in the cities.

        Compare that to the Pommie farmer’s struggle to raise one cow per acre; silage, hay, hedging, drainage, muck spreading, fertiliser, vet bills, lucky if he gets to the pub once a week – no competition.

        And the Aussie production is CO2 neutral. The land can’t be used for anything else. Except sheep. If the cattle didn’t eat the grass the termites would, and produce the same amount of CO2 and methane as the cattle.

        p.s. we are “no poorer” than you? Bwahahahaha! (Sorry).

        Reply
          1. Eggs ‘n beer

            Yes. 6,000 acres, £1.7m. Including a small house. Carrying 700 cattle. So $300/acre, compared to c. £10,000/acre in England.

            But the GDP figures are distorted by living costs. No heating. Fuel 70p/litre. Our electricity for the year is about £500, including hot water, cooking, four adults in the house (including 2 boys in early 20s) air conditioning in summer – although we do have a 1.1kW solar system.

      2. shirley3349

        Perhaps, we should go back to something like the deficiency payments we had in the UK before the country entered the Common Market in 1973. Farmers were guaranteed a price for essential products for each coming year based on their estimated costs. If the market price was lower in the event, the taxpayer made up the difference.
        This system did keep prices down for the average consumer, especially for meat and dairy products, though it had many other disadvantages. Farmers always moaned about the price settlement but it did safeguard food supplies to some extent.

        Reply
    2. theasdgamer

      Sometimes shipping is cheaper than manufacturing. About 40% of American processed food comes from China. Raw ingredients shipped to China, processed, then shipped back.

      Not a good plan for America.

      Reply
      1. Prudence Kitten

        Yes, that’s one of the points I had in mind. How does one set about “manufacturing” meat more cheaply than British farmers?

        The question is rhetorical, but honestly I shudder to think. I want to eat beef and mutton from animals that had a reasonably natural, happy life roaming the fields and hillsides and eating grass. Also pork and chicken from free-range animals.

        I won’t give up eating meat, because I believe my health depends on it. But the animals should be treated as well as possible.

        Reply
        1. Penny

          I agree, Prudence Kitten. I try to get my meat from local shops selling wild venison and a collaborative in Devon where there meat is grass-fed and free-range.

          Reply
      2. Steve

        It’s only cheaper, if in fact it really is, because of the gigantic cargo ships. According to Wiki the biggest can carry over 20,000 containers equaling aroung 200,000 Tonnes.
        Another reason Australian Beef (and US) is apparently cheaper is because of huge factory farms that use lot’s of drugs to boost yield and to fight the inevitable diseases in these hell holes – all illegal in the EU but not any more in Bozoland. Oh, and a deal that means they pay no tariffs.
        Bozo’s Brexit: the gift that keeps on giving, but not to the people.

        Reply
        1. Eggs ‘n beer

          Factory farms? Australia? Which planet is your Australia on? I can’t imagine cattle having it any better than here …..

          Reply
          1. Gary Ogden

            Eggs ‘n beer: The beef I buy is on pasture from weaning to on-farm slaughter. In the U.S. virtually all beef cattle spend their lives on pasture eating grass and forbs, until, for most of them, the last few weeks, when they are shipped to feed lots, where they are fattened up on grain and antibiotics. These feed lots are the “factory farms,” although they’re not farms at all. Once fattened, they are sent to processors, which are indeed factories. The feed lots, like conventional dairies, stink to high heaven, and the cattle are stained up to their knees in feces. Our Department of Agriculture inspects these places, but not too carefully. There is a loophole in USDA regulations, allowing people to by an entire animal, or half, to be sent, un-inspected, to small processors. This is the primo stuff. This is what I buy and eat.

          2. Eggs ‘n beer

            Same here. We used to grow our own, but as you get older the cows get bigger ….. so now we source from a similar operation that you buy from. The same place that we buy the grass fed unhomogenised milk from.

            There are feed lots in Australia but I’ve never seen one as bad as you describe. Many customers actually want grain fattened beef. Weird, I know. But there are no hormones allowed. Otherwise many farmers will use grain at the end if the cattle haven’t had enough grass due to drought. Or they’ll truck them a thousand miles to where there is grass.

  63. theasdgamer

    “Understanding the covid data”

    In my county, covid deaths peaked in the third week of December. Since deaths follow cases by about a month, cases likely peaked in November. The county health director attributed the drop in deaths to some unknown treatment, for which there was no evidence. Nothing in the media or otherwise.

    Yet there is a potential problem with my assertion–my county didn’t see cases drop until the first week of January. How to explain that? Very simple. People in my county were all highly exposed and would have tested positive for covid by the third week of November. And flu didn’t hit hard until December, which is normal. However, the flu cases were likely misdiagnosed as covid. But surely flu didn’t stop the first week of January? No, it didn’t but because people had cleared the covid viral RNA out of their systems about six weeks after the covid infection peak the third week of November, covid PCR tests came back negative and people were correctly diagnosed with the flu or other ILIs.

    I like my explanation better than the explanation of the county health director, who has a Ph.D. in epidemiology.

    The strongest evidence for vaccines reducing covid cases is the drop in cases by age group corresponding to the rollout.

    Reply
  64. Penny

    I am at my wit’s end. What with pressure from my husband to have a vaccine so that he can go on holiday, my SIL has just told me that young people are getting vaccinated as they are altruistic and want to protect the rest of us!! I told her that this is a terrible explanation and had to refrain from saying anything else so that I could maintain my temper. So, she is willing to sacrifice her children and grandchildren so that she can (supposedly) stay free of infection with SARS-COV-2. The answer, of course, is that it isn’t her children she is thinking about sacrificing. I have no children but am incensed that governments are vaccinating or considering vaccinating young people with a risky genetic treatment against a virus which is no threat to them. (Apologies if I make typos but I can only see the top half of my input.). I am nauseous with rage and despair. I apologise for posting this on here but I am surrounded by people who are vaccinated and who believe the official narrative; it is considered that I am selfish as I’m not getting a vaccine. Are you being asked to administer coronavirus vaccines to young people, Dr Kendrick? How will you feel if you are forced to give one of these vaccines to children? What a mess..

    Reply
    1. andy

      Firstly I doubt if your silly husband will ever get to go on his holiday. Certainly a holiday with any of the real spiritual health giving aspects of what a holiday used to provide. It will be simply a depressing realisation that the rest of the world is in a state of neurosis too. There is more to a holiday than just being there. Stay strong and refuse gently with the rest of us. If they really threaten you with prison or violence then we will see..but firstly make them turn to the aggression that we suspect is coming. Will the person ringing you be happy to hold down a 7 year old for the injection….and the ones to come in time?

      Reply
      1. Penny

        Andy, I was born and raised on a farm in the UK; we were very short of money and did not have holidays, which I think has had an important influence on my not needing to ‘go’ somewhere. We live in a beautiful part of the country, the New Forest, and have several acres, a productive vegetable garden, chicken and animals; why do I need to go somewhere else? Yes, I enjoy travelling from time-to-time but it is not necessary and is certainly not worth having ‘the jab’ for. Sadly we are on totally different sides on this and I hope that we can resolve the issues before it gets too entrenched and bitter. I am told that I do not understand statistics as I’m an artist and therapist (I was also trained as a building surveyor and was a computer programmer but that doesn’t count). I understand enough to see that the official figures are designed to create fear where there should be none. Let’s hope that the truth is out sooner rather than later.

        Reply
        1. andy

          Its not worth it Penny . I went for an outdoor swim the other day in the local pool, and counted 94 notices placed around the pool as I swam up and down my lane…nothing, except that, being allowed. It might be worse on your hols !
          I got ticked off for ordering a coffee in my trunks not wearing a mask. I usually just leap over the fence and swim in one of the many gravel-pits here. No-one has ticked me off there in 15 years. If someone did I would describe the poetry of the place and show them the nature that surrounded us …and then lend them my phone to call the police! A holiday is all in the mind. Good luck with hubby.- If you find me, you can have two days at half price £45pn, and we might get him to come along too.

          Reply
        2. Steve

          Penny, I sympathise with your predicament. The bottom line is that you cannot ‘untake’ the vaccine, so you need to stand firm against any hostilities, particularly if ‘giving in’ could impact your health.
          May I suggest you send your husband off on holiday on his own, if he is mature enough to handle that. IMO – Marriage doesn’t mean that you have to be joined at the hip and shouldn’t mean that your interests and beliefs are totally meshed.

          Reply
      1. Penny

        Thank you, Rolan Ayers. This deals mostly with children rather than young adults. The not-so-subtle jibe from my SIL was that I am being selfish as my having a vaccine for the coronavirus will protect her and her family. I notice that when I reply to people that I have not been vaccinated they draw back from me as if I had leprocy. Why is it that people think that the unvaccinated are a threat to the vaccinated? Unfortunately Sebastian Rushworth states that there is asymptomatic transmission in his book. Does anyone have a link to a definitive piece that disproves asymptomatic spread? (My husband is an accountant and MBA; I blame his years at the BBC.)

        Reply
        1. David Bailey

          I suspect that proving/disproving asymptomatic transmission must be nearly impossible in practice. However, the concept of asymptomatic transmission was incredibly useful to those who wanted to start a panic and justify lockdown.

          Reply
          1. andy

            Such jibes from your SIL are sinister as it indicates the level of brain washing that has occurred. I always remember a scene from the futuristic film ‘Logans Run’..when the two perfect cleaners come into his flat.
            “We are Deltas and we are happy. We play ball on Sundays.” their only phrase. repeated over and over again.

          2. Gary Ogden

            David Bailey: Yes, a perfect absurdity. Part of the very effective propaganda, the fear porn. Useful because it sounds sciency. The only clinical trials I am aware of concerning viral transmission were conducted by the U.S. Navy, in 1919-20. The results showed not a single case of transmission of influenza from the very symptomatic to the asymptomatic. On the other hand, if we accept that what have long been called pathogenic viruses are nothing more than endogenously-produced exosomes, waste products from cellular metabolism, there is no transmission. It is well established that bacteria and fungi can cause disease, but I’m inclined to think that “viruses” as exogenous, transmissible pathogens may be a figment of the imagination. Show me incontrovertible evidence and I’ll shut up.

          3. Jerome Savage

            Compelling argument gary and one I hav heard several times without contradiction. I suspect Dr Kendrick thinks differently. His references to huge transmission in care homes infers that infection occurs between the vulnerable while in close proximity and also suggests that PPE makes a difference. In a separate response on this page dr k suggests that the jab is less harmful than the infection.
            As an aside, It appears that this blog is increasingly going soft on the vax agenda which is interesting. Another commentator inferred that low case rates among the young coincides with jab rollout. At this stage the endless MSM publicity and roll out of anxiety is deeply concerning in light of all the other world issues that are being ignored. I am growing increasingly intolerant of the message from our health services and MSM and my BS antennae are picking up too many signals to ever consider buying in. The opposite in fact. Is Dr K edging towards the mainstream beat ?

          4. Gary Ogden

            Jerome Savage: To me, it is simply an unsettled question, that viral transmission occurs. A mystery. Dr. Kendrick has been in close contact with many very ill people for many months while treating them, part of that time without any masks, yet he didn’t get sick. I don’t get sick, but I did in childhood. I think it a question worthy of discussion. What percentage of the population actually had symptoms of the ‘Rona? I think the number is quite small. Why, then are most people immune?

          5. Jerome Savage

            Without a doubt worthy of discussion. There is a suggestion from some that the stress generated by, let’s call it a plague of constant scary data and hyped up nasty news, say fear mongering, itself causes harm. Fight or flight mode triggered and on a constant level with consequent negative effects for the individual. Without the normal social & sporting releases the problem is compounded. However that does not explain care homes where many would not be aware of the media storm raging outside. My own household had 3 positive tests but symptoms were mild and lasted just a few days. Did we infect each other
            https://rawchemistry.com/blogs/news/cortisol-stress-has-7-really-negative-effects-on-the-body
            Dr Kendrick has referred to stress and its effect on heart disease. As someone noted there are many factors involved that we just cant explain including the effect of the sun or lack of it. Its fascinating really and the attempts by pharma to sell a magic pill for this and every ill is more of a distraction in my mind. PS Music helps me de-stress especially van Morrison.

            My tonic besides hiking – free medicine& no side effects.

          6. ShirkeyKate

            ‘Is Dr K edging towards the mainstream beat?’ God, I do hope so. We need him, and all the sensible medical people we can get.

        2. Carole

          I listened to a very good talk

          Not sure if it was here he talked about asymptomatic spread or Mike Yeadon. Still very interesting.

          Reply
    2. Marion Husband

      Penny, I feel exactly the same, although luckily my husband knows how strongly I feel about this horrible nonsense and accepts my decision not to get vaccinated or to ever wear a mask anywhere. (He told me he would stop wearing a mask if the evil ones went back on their word of ending this on June 21st, but as we rarely go shopping together I don’t know if he is keeping to his word, I suspect not. I guess I’ll find out at the weekend if we brave B&Q for badly needed decorating materials). Our daughter and grandson live in Paris and so of course he wants to go and see them ASAP, one of the reasons he took the jab, but I strongly suspect that we won’t be allowed (allowed! Ffs!) to travel abroad and that we will be locked down again in October or sooner so all the jabs in the world won’t make any difference to freedom of movement for us.

      Reply
      1. andy

        It is dawning on the most gullible of the herd now that this is going to be the new normal.
        Travel is going to be the carrot they dangle over our heads to get us to sign up to the social credit passport. The final straw for many is being forced to inject their own kids, who dont at all need injecting.

        Reply
      1. tonyP

        Malcolm, I doubt that you are wrong.

        “…..the magnet adhered to their skin without difficulty” Meaningless! You can easily stick anything flat e.g. metal disc, magnetic or not, and it can stick to your skin. Just make sure that the effect of friction (due to a combination of skin elasticity and perspiration) is not overcome by gravity. The social media posts show how this happens. Probably a complete con.

        Reply
      2. Steve

        I wouldn’t waste your valuable time. Even if it was true, so what ?
        Speaking against the establishment agenda does tend to have the unintended consequence of attracting nutters. These travelling companions are not really welcome as everyone then gets tarred with the same brush.

        Reply
      3. David Bailey

        Why not try on yourself, since you have been vaccinated. If you don’t see anything, then I’d revert to your former scepticism. The above paper reads rather like a hoax. For example:

        “To try to answer these questions, the survey was entrusted to Mr. Amar GOUDJIL, treasurer of the association and member in charge of demographic and sociological issues.”

        Reply
        1. Eggs ‘n beer

          Yes, but when vaxxers and anti-vaxxers collide there is a huge explosion and both cease to exist.

          Reply
  65. Carole

    I’m in a similar situation except my OH is very supportive of my opinion especially over travel. I’m reading an interesting book- (only just started so might not be good all the way!) A state of fear by Laura Dodsworth. Might help with the relatives…..!

    Reply
  66. Martin Back

    Infected individuals can carry extraordinarily high viral loads without symptoms. In some cases, viral loads as high as intubated people in hospitals.

    At Colorado University they tested all students in residence weekly. 1045 tested positive. Of these, 20% infected their roommates. The viral loads of the infected varied tremendously.

    The highest observed viral load in the current study was more than 6 trillion virions per mL. “It is remarkable to consider that this individual was on campus and reported no symptoms at our testing site,” the researchers write.

    In contrast, the lowest viral load detected was 8 virions per mL. [These were probably just fragments remaining from a previous infection]https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/951102

    The conclusion is that a few asymptomatic carriers with very high viral loads are super-spreaders, but most asymptomatic individuals do not spread the disease.

    “The takeaway from these studies is that most people with COVID don’t get other people sick, but a few people get a lot of people sick,” said Sara Sawyer, a professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology and senior author of the first study. “If you don’t have a viral super-carrier sitting near you at dinner, you might be OK. But if you do, you’re out of luck. It’s a game of roulette so you have to continue to be careful.”https://scitechdaily.com/super-carriers-2-of-people-carry-90-of-covid-19-virus/

    Reply
    1. Jerome Savage

      Probably just like the flu. No reason to put everyone on lockdown especially on a campus where the young are not significantly affected.

      Reply
    2. David Bailey

      Martin,

      “The highest observed viral load in the current study was more than 6 trillion virions per mL. ”

      Since this was from a person who was not ill, isn’t it more likely that the test was glitching in some way? We are swamped with tests and everyone seems to treat them as ultimate oracles.

      Reply
      1. Prudence Kitten

        “Since this was from a person who was not ill, isn’t it more likely that the test was glitching in some way?”

        Unless of course it’s possible for someone to have such a viral load and remain perfectly healthy.

        Reply
      1. Martin Back

        I doubt it’s possible to distinguish between asymptomatic and presymptomatic individuals without observing them over time.

        Say you are an official and have someone standing in front of you who might be infectious. What do you do with them, right now?

        People with symptoms are easy: they must be isolated.

        People without symptoms are a problem. How do you determine if they are or might become a source of infection and need to be isolated?

        Reply
        1. theasdgamer

          Then there is no evidence for your statement:

          “The conclusion is that a few asymptomatic carriers with very high viral loads are super-spreaders, but most asymptomatic individuals do not spread the disease.”
          ———————————–

          “How do you determine if they are or might become a source of infection and need to be isolated?”

          Why isolate anyone? We have treatment with evidence to support its effectiveness.

          The evidence for presymptomatic spread is that it is not significant. There is no evidence for asymptomatic spread. I don’t give the Marine Corps study any weight.

          All those nasty asymptomatic people might be infected, so we’d better quarantine the lot of them.

          Bonkers.

          Reply
          1. Martin Back

            “The evidence for presymptomatic spread is that it is not significant.”

            In a university campus in lockdown, you have two people with no symptoms and sharing a room. One tests positive (still with no symptoms) and is removed. Subsequently the roommate tests positive. This happens in 200 out of 1000 cases where one roommate tests positive (round numbers). So asymptomatic people can infect others. But analysing the results, it was only the asymptomaic students with high viral loads who were infectious; those with low viral loads were not infectious.

            Presymptomatic spread may not be significant, but presumably someone who is presymptomatic is in the early stages of infection and will become symptomatic once their viral load is big enough, or in fact might not become symptomatic, if these results are to be believed. In other words, the notion of “presymptomatic” is not useful in real life.

        2. Prudence Kitten

          “Say you are an official and have someone standing in front of you who might be infectious. What do you do with them, right now?”

          Smile, say “Hello”, shake hands with them, and wish them a good day.

          Why?

          Reply
          1. Martin Back

            I’m assuming the official in question is dealing with a situation where the infectiousness or otherwise of a person matters — for instance, whether to allow entrance to a closed environment like an aircraft or indoor gathering or university campus or school or hospital or jail.

    3. me oliveira

      Ok, I’m so tired of ignorance and dullness…
      Read the things @ https://www.creative-diagnostics.com/coronavirus.htm
      In every page they have about corona tests, they wrote, more than a year ago:
      Regulatory status: For research use only, not for use in diagnostic procedures.
      Believe them. They were one of the first to do the swab test and they don’t want to loose money in judicial/legal processes.

      Reply
    4. Irene Wood

      Martin Black post dated 6/25/2021
      Can you identify the test used to determine viral load?
      (The only test I have heard being used in colleges is the PCR test which cannot give viral load.)
      It sounds like this was some kind of serum test since you quote figures virion/mL ?
      Thanks

      Reply
    5. theasdgamer

      Furthermore, the study didn’t do any viral culturing, so there’s no reason to believe that the asymptomatic people carried actual virus in large amounts.

      Reply
      1. David Bailey

        Since the sensitivity of the PCR test goes down if you do less cycles, I suppose you could adjust such a test so that it would respond to high viral load samples but not to lower loads. Thus if you did PCR tests with a range of cycle times on the same sample, you should get some measure of the load. The whole thing would need calibrating of course, using samples of virus with known viral loads. Possibly obtaining those reference samples might prove impossible…….

        Reply
      2. Irene Wood

        theasdgamer blog 6/25/21
        Thanks for answering. I suspected the “data” came from PCR but I did not read blogger Martin Black’s link myself. I agree that viral culturing is the only way to verify firstly that the PCR +ve result is not a false positive and secondly to get anything remotely scientifically accurate on viral load. The PCR test must hold the world record for medical spin!!

        Reply
  67. Robert

    A comparison of COVID risks and vaccine risks in a peer-reviewed journal

    https://www.mdpi.com/2076-393X/9/7/693/htm

    Not that complementary to the COVID vaccines so it’ll probably get censored to hell by the mainstream media, esp. the NYT, Wash. Post, Guardian, FT, BBC, Independent, C4.

    There may be hope though. Lockdown Sceptics keeps finding stuff in the Mail, Telegraph, Sunday Times. Fox News, WSJ, Sky News Australia … I think those are all ‘MSM’ too?

    It’s just that some people strangely believe what they read in the MSM and disbelieve anything else. ‘Credibility’ matters.

    Reply
  68. me oliveira

    Dr. Sebastian Rushworth entered the predictable fall at his blog.
    The proving facts started when he asked Dr. Malcolm Kendrick for a foreword. An idiotic ‘interview’ and the commentaries also show that.
    I tell him 3 times. Now he is censoring me. I rejoice.

    Reply
  69. theasdgamer

    Dr. Kendrick, imo medical students and practicing physicians could do with a required course in medical epistemology.

    Researchers would also benefit, but they are unlicensed so enforcing any suggestion would be difficult if not impossible.

    People often think that philosophy mostly is about wondering whether chairs are sentient, but there are branches of philosophy that are eminently practical, like epistemology.

    Reply
    1. Sasha

      A friend of mine, who is a nuclear physicist by training, once told me that the foundation of all science is philosophy

      Reply
      1. theasdgamer

        Of course, science used to be called “natural philosophy.” Back then, only physics, chemistry, and biology were members of the science club. Once people understood the prestige and funding to be gained, everybody wanted to join the club–mathematics, psychology, sociology, engineering, and economics. Letting the riffraff in and the name of “science” suffers. Experimental mathematics, lol. Mathematics is a rigorous discipline, but it isn’t natural philosophy. Engineering is a practical field, but it isn’t natural philosophy.

        Reply
    1. LA_Bob

      HI, JD.

      Have you considered sending that link to Dr Fauci? Hancock? Whitty? Walensky? Newsom? Cuomo? Whitmer?…..?….?….?

      Reply
      1. JDPatten

        No, Bob.
        Us. Here. Those of us feeding each other with rote approval of ideas we’re emotionally invested in. It begins at home.

        Reply
  70. jiver222

    Thing is, from my personal experience any sudden enforced en masse discharge of a group of frail patients may well cause between 1/3 and 1/6 to die in a few weeks. This is a phenomenon that as far as I am aware has never been researched by the NHS. I witnessed it myself as an elderly care staff nurse involved in the ward by ward closure of Park Prewett Hospital in Basingstoke in the 90’s. Among other factors are the completely different way a nursing home is run from a hospital, and that a transfer system may be designed to cope with say as many as 2 admissions in a day, but not a whole ward of 24 patients. In my ward of 24 patients 4 died, 2 from falls in their private rooms. Previously they had been cared for in open dormitories. And that was with the same staff transferring with the patients. In a parallel case, where the staff did not transfer, 8 out of 24 died. I’ve seen what happens when NHS managers are panicked.

    Reply

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